Chocolate Cold Process Soap

I’m well known to be a Coffee Butter junkie, but I haven’t shared my other major junkie affliction. Yes, I am a chocoholic. Doesn’t that sound like an anonymous group of sorts? “Hello. My name is Andee and I’m a chocoholic.” Whoops! I think I got off topic! Anyway, I love to curl up with a book, a cup of coffee and some type of chocolate, whether it is a brownie, chocolate bar, Andes Mints, or chocolate cookies. Today, I thought it would be fun to make a cold process soap that could find its way into any chocoholics heart and the best thing about this soap is that it is calorie free! (Mostly because soap wouldn’t taste good to eat and who would want to eat soap anyway?)

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Cocoa Butter, Regular
Olive Oil
Baking Chocolate
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Extra Large Square Tray Mold
Square Tray Mold
Soap Buckets
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 3 minutes
Adding baking chocolate to melted oils: 45 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 150 seconds (2.5 minutes)
Pour into molds: 60 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
35 ounces Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
30 ounces Coconut Oil
10 ounces Olive Oil
5 ounces Cocoa Butter
0.625 ounces Unsweetened Baking Chocolate

11.56 ounces Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
30 ounces of Water

Weigh the baking chocolate, chop into small chunks and set aside.

Measure oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. Once the oils are melted, add the baking chocolate and stir until completely melted. Bring temperature to near 120 °F. Exact temperature is not critical. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Allow to cool to near 120 °F. Once again, exact temperature is not critical.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Add fragrance if you desire. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

Cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

This soap smells like Devil’s Food Cake and allows any chocoholic to enjoy their addiction even while bathing!

Notes: We only recommend 1/8 to 1/4 to ounce of baking chocolate per pound of fats in a batch. We are primarily using the baking chocolate for scent and color, so a little will go a long way!

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Oils ready for the microwave.

Adding lye to the water.

Mixing the lye solution.

Melted oils.

Adding baking chocolate to the melted oils.

Baking chocolate mixed with the melted oils.

Mixing the batch together.

The batch is almost at trace.

Adding the lye solution to the batch.

Continuing to mix the batch.

Soaps sitting in the molds.

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Chocolate Cold Process Soap, 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 rating

41 Comments

  • CanfieldFive says:

    *drools* This looks delicious! (Well, you know what I mean!) We’ve been looking for a good chocolate soap recipe, and this looks incredible! How strong is the chocolate scent when the soap is finished? You mentioned Devil’s Food Cake, but would you describe it as a light/medium/strong scent? We’ve made a cocoa butter batch before, but the chocolate scent is barely noticeable, and we wanted something with more of a chocolate kick.

    Also, is there any way to do this with only cocoa powder, or would you recommend still making the baking chocolate first?

    Thanks!
    -Cheyenne

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    • Andee says:

      I like the baking chocolate first concept. Sometimes a powder doesn’t mix well with an oil and it needs a bit of time to saturate fully and become “one” with the oil.

      If you want to use cocoa powder, try 1 teaspoon per lb of fats. Do not pack the teaspoon. Make it light and fluffy.

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  • kathyjane says:

    mmmm……. to bad this doesn’t taste like it looks! How the lather with this recipe? I made a chocolate soap last year that I threw away because it didn’t lather at all. Smelled great though. :-)

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    • Andee says:

      You never need to throw away soap. You can grate it, make a new batch, and include the shavings to make a confetti look. The lather will be just fine. Thanks to the coconut oil!

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  • BassOver says:

    Yum….could this recipe use Goats milk?

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  • bluebutterflz says:

    I made chocolate soap once. I added almond milk and gave it a bit of spice with cinnamon, clove and an extra spoonful of cocoa powder. It went through the process wonderfully. I unmolded it just fine and it dried smelling heavenly the whole way through. Then much to my nightmare when I went to cut it 2-3 days later the very center turned to my a clear liquidy toxic smelling goo. It went everywhere! It was like a trojan horse! LOL. Do you happen to know what went wrong? Cause most of it looked and smelled great but the very center. That was the only time something like that had ever happened to me.

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    • Andee says:

      This is a problem with adding cinnamon and cloves, which accelerate the saponification reaction in a temperamental soap. All milk soaps are temperamental. We should always watch to make sure the heat doesn’t take off like wild horses. Milk soaps we start with lower temperatures, pour shallowly, and don’t add accelerants. This batch had just too much heat and you have the gelatinous goo in the center. This can be rebatched and used just fine. In the future use the chocolate, the milk and cocoa powder. Use the cinnamon and cloves in a water batch of soap.

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  • kathyjane says:

    Darn! Why didn’t I think of the confetti soap thing?! It would have been great to put chocolate chunks in a creamy vanilla soap. Maybe I’ll try that with a small batch of this chocolate soap.

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  • zanlue says:

    So this is a little off subject but I needed to ask you a question and I can’t find anywhere else to do it- what I was wondering is if you could provide a recipe for children’s bath crayons (soap). I’ve found recipes online, but they all just call for ivory shavings and I have bought pretty much all the different soap ingredients from you guys and would like to make them from scratch and pour them into the animal faces molds. Any suggestions?

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    • Andee says:

      You could do this with melt and pour soap and lots of colorant. My concern with doing this is the color can be a pain to remove.

      If you use a dye, expect that the grout could be colored and extreme cases of red color may leave the skin colored.

      If you use a pigment, expect that the grout could be colored and wash cloths may not give up the color when laundered.

      The dyes can’t color a wash cloth permanently because they are not able to attach to the fiber (cellulose). Pigments are like dirt and can be “ground” in and the fibers can hold on to the particles but they aren’t actually making the fiber a different color. Most of us have seen pigment colored
      clothing. It also tends to be uneven and more matte colored.

      So, while I think these can be done, and I think there is a lot of marketing behind them, and I think the “cool” factor is high, the practical side of me knows the work I must go to when I need to remove the color from my grout or laundry or that my kids go overboard on the red the day of their school pictures. So, as you can see, I am not a great fan of the concept for reasons which have me labeled “an old fart”.

      Good luck, and may the force be with you.

      Tina

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  • [...] be calorie laden, then the craving would subside. My only problem is that I’ve made a chocolate cold process soap before and I wanted to try something new. Looking for inspiration, I remembered a post that was [...]

  • Leigh says:

    2 questions. Did you add FO to this recipe (if so what flavor please)?

    And do you think this would work as a Hot Process? Thanks so much for your time

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    • Andee says:

      Leigh,
      I did not add any fragrance to this soap. The Cocoa Butter and Baking Chocolate are what gave the soap the chocolate scent.

      Yes. This soap should work as a Hot Process soap.

      Good Luck!

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  • Angel says:

    Just came across this website and i was wondering…can this recipe substitute or remove the soybean oil? as I am allergic to that…because i would love to try to make this soap for myself (mainly) and maybe as gifts for family and close friends.

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  • Angel says:

    Thanks! for the response, Andee, but how do I recalculate the lye? I have never done anything like this before…..I need a “dummy” manual.

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  • Leigh says:

    Andee, Thank you so much for quick reply. I am gonna give it a go tonight. Will let you know how it turns out. Thanks again!

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  • Camila says:

    Thank you for sharing! It looks amazing!!!

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  • Janet Schreiner says:

    I am going to share this recipe with my daughter….and I’m going to try it too!

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  • AMOF says:

    Parece ser muito bom mesmo! estou a procura de uma receita para fazer um belo sabão de chocolate e parece que encontrei! pretendo usar com os óleos de Palma, Palmiste, Estearina de Palma e Oliva… mas estou com uma duvida que concentração de NaOH devo usar? 32% seria adequado?

    Obrigado pela atenção.

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    • Andee says:

      Are you planning on using a liquid NaOH solution or mixing dry NaOH with a liquid of your choice? If using a liquid solution, it is best to use a mixture that is a 50/50 mixture. If you are mixing yourself, then we recommend 4 to 6 fluid ounces of water per pound of oils used. (113 to 170 milliliters per 450 grams)

      I hope this helps!

      Você está pensando em usar uma solução de NaOH líquido ou mistura NaOH seco com um líquido de sua escolha? Se utilizar uma solução líquida, o melhor é utilizar uma mistura que é uma mistura de 50/50. Se você está misturando-se, então recomendamos 4 a 6 onças fluidas de água por quilo de óleos usados. (113-170 mililitros por 450 gramas)

      Espero que isso ajude!

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  • Brigitte says:

    Hello, that is a wonderful recipe and I want to try it this week. Thank you for sharing it. I am new to soap making and I was wondering about the fact that you said to let the soap cure for a few days. I was under the impression that cold process soap needed to cure for 4 to 6 weeks. Thank you.

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  • Heidifromoz says:

    Alternative for soybean oil?

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  • ioana says:

    I am wondering, do you gell your soap? And if not, will it get the ash on the surface? Because I made my first CP with no gell (I wanted to keep the colours I used), but the ash appeared on the top. What do you advice me?

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    • Andee says:

      I do allow my soaps to gel because it allows me to not worry about the soap stalling. Soda Ash is sodium carbonate that has formed when Sodium Hydroxide in the soap has had contact with Carbon Dioxide in the air. The best way to prevent Soda Ash is to cover the soap with plastic wrap. You can also wash the Soda Ash off after you cut the soap.
      I hope this helps!

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      • ioana says:

        But, if you put a plastic wrap over your mold, like in the picture you put in this recipe, won’t it stick to the soap? What if the soap has a nice finished top? If you put something on it, you run th risk to destroy it :(

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        • Tina says:

          You can cover with a dome of some type that leaves very little air space to cause soda ash to develop.

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  • grams05 says:

    How do I post a question here about a problem I have with one of my homemade soaps, but not about this issue? PLEASE HELP TY

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    • Tina says:

      Just ask your question anywhere, or go to the About > Contact Us page and we will help.

      TIna

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  • Kat says:

    I’m missing instructions on whether or not the soap needs to be covered in towels for the first 24 hours or if the heat of the added sugar from the baking chocolate will make this unnecessary?
    Also, when you say “combining lye solution with oils”, you’re assuming that folks know enough about cold pressed soap making already and won’t pour the oils into the lye solution?

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    • Andee says:

      We don’t recommend covering soaps in towels because we would rather you start with temperatures between 115 and 130 Fahrenheit. As I made this unsweetened baking chocolate, there was not any sugar added to this soap and I did not have excess heat from sugars.

      This post was ideally written for soapers that have a few batches of soap under their belts. We recommend our Intro to Cold Process Soap series for those who are just starting or want to read before jumping in.

      I hope this helps!

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  • Christy says:

    Do you have any idea of shelf life and scent life when using bakers chocolate? Can’t wait to try this recipe! Thanks!

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  • Nelly says:

    Hi,
    I was wondering if the lather of this soap is brown. Is there any way to prevent that?
    Thanks for your post.

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    • Tina says:

      Yes, the lather is a bit brown. The only way to prevent the lather from being brown is to have the brown come from a fragrance oil and not a pigment or a plant powder. In the case of chocolate soap it is from a plant powder.

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