Grease Monkey Hand Scrub

We are now approaching the end of July and I’ve been spending my time out in the garden, but my biggest difficulty after weeding is trying to scrub dirt out of the my knuckles. Unfortunately, this scrubbing doesn’t only occur after weeding, but after any dirty chores. I realized I hated spending so much time trying to scrub and still not completely getting rid of the dirt. After I realized this, I asked myself, “Why am I spending so much time trying to scrub my hands when I can make a scrub that works quickly?”

I sat down and made a list of products that would help me achieve the desired effect of clean hands! I decided to start with the Glycerin Scrub Base and the Fine Pumice. I made a small test batch and realized that there wasn’t enough texture to help scrub my hands. I decided to add Fine Dead Sea Salt to the batch and see if that worked. Once I had mixed in the salt, I found the coarse scrubbing texture to be just right, but I wanted more help removing grease from my hands. That was when I remembered the conversation I had had with Tina about the properties of clay that can be useful for helping to remove impurities from the skin, like oil. After that thought, I had to find my Red Morocco Clay to add to the scrub. I added the clay, but because the pumice and salt had already been added, the clay did not mix well into the scrub. I set that test batch aside and started over again.

This time I added the Red Morocco Clay to the Glycerin Scrub Base and stirred before I added any other ingredients. Once the clay had been stirred in completely, I added the Fine Pumice and Fine Dead Sea Salt. This time the scrub was just what I wanted!

Collect needed supplies:
Glycerin Scrub Base
Fine Pumice
Fine Dead Sea Salt
Red Morocco Clay (or clay of your choice)
Fragrance or Essential Oil of your choice (I’m using Eastern Amber Fragrance Oil)
Transfer Pipettes
Measuring spoons
Container for mixing
Scale
Mixing spoon
Containers and caps of your choice

Recipe: (In grams)
150 grams Glycerin Scrub Base
4 grams Red Morocco Clay
50 grams Fine Pumice
50 grams Fine Dead Sea Salt
1 gram Eastern Amber Fragrance Oil
Makes 255 grams

Recipe: (In ounces)
5.30 ounces Glycerin Scrub Base
0.15 ounces Red Morocco Clay
1.75 ounces Fine Pumice
1.75 ounces Fine Dead Sea Salt
0.05 ounces Eastern Amber Fragrance Oil
Makes 9 ounces

Weigh the Glycerin Scrub Base and clay into your container for mixing and blend thoroughly until there are no more clumps of clay. Once the clay has been incorporated into the scrub base, add the pumice and salt to the mixture. Stir until there are no more pockets of dry ingredients. Add the Eastern Amber Fragrance Oil and stir.

After all ingredients are completely mixed, fill the containers of your choice. This is a great scrub to put in the Grand Oval Bottles, especially if it for the grease monkey with really dirty paws! (Pun intended.)

Enjoy this scrub!

Andee

Collect needed items.

Collect needed items.

Weigh the Glycerin Scrub Base.

Weigh the Glycerin Scrub Base.

Weigh the clay.

Weigh the clay.

Stirring the clay into the scrub base.

Stirring the clay into the scrub base.

Clay mixed into the scrub base.

Clay mixed into the scrub base.

Weighing pumice.

Weighing pumice.

Mixing pumice and salt into the base.

Mixing pumice and salt into the base.

Filling the jars with the finished scrub.

Filling the jars with the finished scrub.

Weighing the salt.

Weighing the salt.

Completely mixed scrub.

Completely mixed scrub.

Filled jars and Grand Oval Jars.

Filled jars and Grand Oval Jars.

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4 Comments

  • dustie says:

    this looks great! dose it lather like soap would?

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    • Andee says:

      dustie,

      It does have a light lather. It doesn’t make big bubbles, but the scrub works well.

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  • tamithornton says:

    I recently came across a recipe for sugar scrub cubes.
    The cubes can be made small enough that you use just one per bath/shower. The advantage is that the consumer is not scooping out a glob of some oily scrub — potentially contaminating the rest of the product in the container. Also — can avoid having a glass container in the shower — a potential breakage disaster.
    The recipe contained some melt and pour soap (to help solidify, I imagine). Wondered what else could be substituted for the melt and pour?
    Tami

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    • Andee says:

      Tami,
      I’m not sure that you can replace the Melt & Pour Soap. The soap helps the scrub retain the shape and therefore, I don’t think you can replace it. Let me look into it and see what I can find.

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