Spirulina Powder in Cold Process Soap

We have been making Tinctures and Infusions with several dried herbs and with many of the powders that are available in the catalog. Today, instead of using the extraction method to get the properties or color out of the dried herbs or powders I would like to show you how to use them directly in your cold process soaps. My main reason for doing this is to show you some wonderful color options for your soaps that the powders will provide.Today I am going to use Spirulina Powder, this powder has a beautiful green color that I hope to carry over into my soap. Spirulina is a blue-green algae that is found in nature growing in the still, alkaline waters of lakes and ponds, it grows best in warm, fresh water lakes, but can also be found in saltwater or natural springs. Spirulina is natural and has existed since life began (or so they say). Its name comes from the spiraling shape that it makes as it grows. Spirulina is what gives bodies of water their dark green color; so why not add it to soap for the same effect?I have gathered some supplies and I’m ready show you how easy adding botanical color can be.

Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Spirulina Powder
Equipment
Scale
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Infusion
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
5 grams Infusion
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Infusion

Begin by weighing all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool separately until they reach a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. When cooled, mix the oils and lye solution together and blend with immersion blender until trace is achieved. Once your mixture has made it to trace add in your powder approximately 1 teaspoon, mix thoroughly then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

That’s it! Where is the easy button?

I have noticed that when adding the powders that I am getting a deep bold color or tint to the soap. I only used 1 tsp and got this fabulous color.

I have added a few photos to show you the process, I hope you are making some great soaps with me and enjoying the fun. Check out the last photo of all the soap lined up Spirulina Powder is the third from the left, beautiful green color. I will keep watching and see if the color changes while it cures.
Tonya

Mixing Spirulina Powder in Soap
Infusions, Tinctures, and Powders in Soap
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Spirulina Powder in Cold Process Soap, 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 rating

9 thoughts on “Spirulina Powder in Cold Process Soap”

  1. Those ar! pretty! But, dying to know, have you used the kelp powder in soap? I’d really like to know how that turns out, especially if it smells fishy.

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    1. This usage rate on the spirulina did not alter the scent in any way. The color has changed to a medium brown however.

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  2. My experience with spirulina and some other such botanicals is that they tend to brown as they cure. Spirulina can also leave your soap with a fishy smell if you use too much or don’t have a good FO to cover it up. I’ll be interested to see if you have a different experience or if there is anything to prevent that. I like the idea of using more natural colorants but in general few things can beat dyes made in a lab (tested for B&B use of course). The only exception that jumps to mind is indigo powder. I just love the colors I can get from that.

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  3. I’ve colored with clays, but haven’t tried these yet.
    With clays, I add the powder right to the cooled oils,
    before adding the lye, add blend a little…works really well.
    I’ll try that with these powders.
    The colors made me smile…..so 70’s! (:

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  4. Wow I LOVE the Spirulina! Perfect green for spring and summer! The orange peel really surprised me – it is so light in the powder form but really pops in soap. Paprika, as always, is beautiful!

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  5. Wow I LOVE the Spirulina! Perfect green for spring and summer although I just read it turns brown. Natural colorants are tricky. The orange peel really surprised me – it is so light in the powder form but really pops in soap. Paprika, as always, is beautiful!

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  6. I did use the Spirulina in my cp soap and it did turn brown…first it was a beautiful dark green, and then it turned brown. Good think I don’t mind brown soap…hehehe

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