Cold Process Soap, Day Four

Today’s Recipe:

6 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 ounces weight Coconut Oil
4 ounces weight Olive Oil
1 ounce weight Grapeseed Oil
2 TBSP dried Peppermint Leaves
7 mL Peppermint Essential Oil

2.2 ounces weight Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

This mixture is much like we have focused all week. The process is quick and the timing of each section is quite short. If you haven’t been following along all week, let me give you a recap of the process by which we have made this batch of soap.

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Crushing peppermint leaves, 15 seconds
Blending in peppermint leaves and oil: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

Botanicals are a simple and fun addition to add to soap. Most often soap makers use whole leaves, buds, twigs and flakes. This results in the concept of scrubbing until your skin is clean, or rubbed off, or both. Soap is a pleasure product, it should clean the outside of the body as well as cleanse the spirit. If whole petals, bark or twigs remove the top 48 million layers of your skin they can’t bring pleasure to the process of bathing. The other thing we worry about in cold process is great looking botanicals don’t look so hot after their exposure to high pH lye. Most things turn black. Now, I don’t know about you, but I find it easier to explain a few black specks as herbs, than to explain why half a rose is dead inside my soap.

I have a photo showing the peppermint leaves we used. These leaves are fully dry and I rubbed the leaves in my hand to crush and powder them more before adding to my soap. Think Thanksgiving turkey and rubbed sage for the stuffing.

We recommend grind, rubbing or somehow breaking all botanicals into small bits. Even oatmeal. To prepare old fashioned rolled, or quick cooking, oats for soap making put the oatmeal in the blender or a food processor. Grind until you get a fine flour. You will know you have the right consistency when you look at it and it looks too fine so you considering calling us to verify if it is OK.

If you forgo the grinding, someone in your household will surely declare, Who cleaned out the lawn mower in the bath tub?!

So, how much to add? This is the question of all questions! Your test batch will prove if the amount of botanical is sufficient. If you feel like you have parsley in your belly button and basil between your toes, you have added too much plant material. However, if you use the test batch soap and say, Self, next time you make this soap, it is OK to add more ground up plant stuff, then you know you can add more. It is always easier to add more botanicals in the future, than to cause excessive tub cleaning after each shower.

So, what about fragrances?

When adding a scenting oil, regardless of whether or not you are using essential oils or fragrance oils, we base the usage on the fats in the batch only. Why do we do this? Because the fats never vary, but your water might, and it will certainly evaporate. Botanicals may vary, but the fats are a set amount each time. The Fragrance Calculator on our site gives some recommendations. Always make a test batch when using a new scent.

To calculate the amount of scent needed, go to the Fragrance Calculator. Choose Cold Process Soap and enter the amounts of fixed oils you have used. This batch used 16 ounces of fixed oils. Now, click NEXT. Choose the scenting oil you desire to use, in this case it is Peppermint Essential Oil. Scroll to the bottom and click CALCULATE.

The resulting table is pretty easy to read. We know Peppermint Essential Oil has a flash point of 163 degrees F, and an specific gravity of 0.8993. The chart below gives usage percentages along the left. Across the top are methods of measurement. In our batch of soap today we are using about a 1.25% usage rate and adding 7 mL (the chart shows 6.7 mL) of Peppermint Essential Oil. This usage rate follows the SUBTLE scenting rates suggested. I can’t measure 0.7 mL in a pipette, so I rounded up to make the scenting easy to measure. Had I wanted to use teaspoons I would need 1.33, and tablespoons are 0.44, and if I wanted to weigh the Peppermint Oil it would be 0.2 ounces.

The chart gives many options. Use the measurement method that you prefer. If the fragrance will discolor, we list that information in the Fragrance Calculator. The notes on this scent say Very minty, very clean. High rates of use can cause skin irritation. Please use this scent mildly and continue making test batches. It is far easier to make 5 test batches before you find your favorite usage rate, instead of allowing the soap to sit in the garage for 3 years so the scent can dissipate.

So, let’s recap today:
1) grind added botanicals finely
2) calculate scent based on the fats only
3) add scent lightly, increasing each time, to find the preferred
amount of scent

The last tip of the day. How much does one pound of fats weigh when converted to soap? Generally 16 ounces of fats makes about 20 to 22 ounces of finished soap, based on
local humidity and added extras like botanicals and clay.

Andee
Next week is all about having luscious lips! Join in for the kissable fun!

Weighed oils.

Weighed oils.

Crushing dried peppermint leaves.

Crushing dried peppermint leaves.

Regular peppermint leaves on the left, crushed peppermint leaves on the right.

Regular peppermint leaves on the left, crushed peppermint leaves on the right.

Adding lye to water.

Adding lye to water.

Stirring lye solution.

Stirring lye solution.

Add lye solution to melted oils.

Add lye solution to melted oils.

Starting to blend oils and lye solution together.

Starting to blend oils and lye solution together.

Tilting immersion blender.

Tilting immersion blender.

Adding Peppermint Essential Oil.

Adding Peppermint Essential Oil.

Adding crushed peppermint leaves.

Adding crushed peppermint leaves.

Starting to blend the crushed peppermint leaves into the soap.

Starting to blend the crushed peppermint leaves into the soap.

Pouring the soap into the mold.

Pouring the soap into the mold.

Pushing the crushed peppermint leaves under with the immersion blender.

Pushing the crushed peppermint leaves under with the immersion blender.

Almost finished blending the peppermint leaves into the soap.

Almost finished blending the peppermint leaves into the soap.

Pouring the last bit of soap into the mold.

Pouring the last bit of soap into the mold.

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10 Comments

  • kathyjane says:

    Thank You so much for going through this process! I’ve made several batches of soap but I’ve learned so much this week!!!!!
    Kathy

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  • gee1058 says:

    Loving This
    Geri Robinson

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  • Sarah Giraffe says:

    What purpose does the tea as opposed to water besides color? I would imagine the scent and botanical properties are destroyed by the lye?

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    • Taylor says:

      Sarah,

      Scent is generally destroyed by the lye but not generally botanical properties. i hope this helps!

      Taylor

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  • Jennifer Gale says:

    There are no links for the oils, peppermint leaves, or peppermint e.o.

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  • Wanda says:

    Can or would you please give me a recipe for this batch making the end results to be a 4 pound log? I’m trying to learn to calculate EO’s and FO’s but my budget doesn’t aloe for mistakes. This would be so helpful if do provide the recommend oils amounts along with the water to lye. However if I have the recommended oils I’ll run it thru the lye cal and get that info on my own. I’ve read that with hot process you should add extra water because it will evaporate during the cook. Is this true? Thank you once again!!

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    • Tina says:

      To make a batch of soap that has a finished weight of 4 lbs you need to start with 44 ounces of oils and fats. Most molds are based on the fat batch size you can put in them, not the final weight of the soap. Please check to make sure you are calculating this type of mold correctly.

      The fragrance and essential oil usage can be calculated using our Fragrance Calculator. It will help you learn how much to use and help you be prepared for what you wish to make.

      I don’t make hot process soap so I am not sure what to advise you on this extra water issue. I don’t find hot process soap to be as beautiful as cold process so I don’t take the
      extra time to make it.

      Cheers!
      Tina

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  • Petr Ruda says:

    Hi,
    where did you get your beakers? Thanks

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    • Tina says:

      They were borrowed from our warehouse. If you need beakers please ask our phone staff for help. They are likely to be able to get you the sizes you desire.

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