Honey and Beeswax Soap 2


Finished Honey and Beeswax Soap

Finished Honey and Beeswax Soap

I had a lot of fun experimenting with honey and beeswax in soap. But what about putting them together? What kinds of risks and challenges might one face? What will the finished soap be like? Today, I wanted to make a soap containing both honey and beeswax so that we can answer these questions. Join me in the blog kitchen for some sweet fun!

Ready to make soap

Ready to make soap

I am really curious about combining both honey and beeswax in soap. In the soaping world, we generally recognize sugars as heat sensitive ingredients. Honey is no different. So how do we make soap using one ingredient that requires high heat for mixing but another requires low heat? Are you ready to find out?

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Olive Oil
Beeswax
Water
Lye
Honey
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 g Coconut Oil
156 g Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
113 g Olive Oil
14 g Beeswax
177 mL Water
64 g Lye
7 grams Honey
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Coconut Oil
5.5 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
0.5 oz Beeswax
6 fl oz Water
2.28 oz Lye
0.25 oz Honey
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Coconut Oil
34.38% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
25% Olive Oil
3.12% Beeswax
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Honey

 

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until they become liquid. While your oils are heating, weigh out the sodium hydroxide. Add the lye to the 6 oz of water. Never add water to your lye container. It can cause a dangerous volcano. Your safety is of the utmost importance. When your oils are at about 160º F and lye solution are at about 110º F, add the lye solution to the oil mixture. Mix until you reach a light trace.

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

The reason why there is such a large temperature difference between the two mixtures is because we do not want to beeswax to solidify nor do we want the soap to overheat. The difference in temperatures allows for the soap to be mixed without volcanoing out of the mold. Once light trace has been achieved, add the honey.

Adding Honey

Adding Honey

I like to have had my honey sitting in a warm water bath so it is easier and faster to get it into my batch of soap. I also like to hand stir the honey into the soap. This prevents over mixing and pudding like consistencies. Pour the soap into a mold. Allow to sit for at least 12 hours. Cut and allow the soap to cure.

Mixing Honey into Soap

Mixing Honey into Soap

If you are not sure if the soap is fully cured, check out this post. It helps makes sense of the mysterious cure time and dispels some popular and dangerous myths. If you need help keeping track of your curing soap, try our fabulous cure cards. We can even include them into qualifying orders for free! Enjoy your soap!

Soap in the mold

Soap in the mold

Notes: When I added the honey to my raw soap and stirred it in, there was a color change but it didn’t seem as drastic as my plain honey soap. I can’t figure out why. What did seem fairly drastic was when my soap started to gel. It became a very dark brown, almost black in appearance. I was afraid it would get so hot that the soap would crack but it did not.

Soap going through gel phase

Soap going through gel phase

When I cut the soap 12 hours later, the soap was a deep tan color. It also smelled like burnt sugar, somewhat like a dark caramel. I was really surprised by the odor because my other soaps had such minimal odor, it wasn’t very noticeable.

I tested the soap at the sink and was pleasantly surprised by the rich, frothy lather that was produce. Wow! Talk about incredible. I even used this bar on my face and am pleased by the results. It is not drying but does not feel heavy either. After patting my face dry, my skin felt like I had put on a very small amount of light moisturizer on it. I think this bar has a permanent place in my bathroom.

Finished soap

Finished soap

If you will be adding honey and beeswax to your soap, please keep the following in mind: we recommend you do not exceed 1 tsp of honey per pound of fat. We also recommend that you do not exceed 0.5 oz of beeswax per pound of fat. These are luxury ingredients where a little goes a very long way.  It is also recommending when using temperature sensitive ingredients that you use mold where you do not pour more than 2 inches deep. Happy soapmaking!

Remember, I will be sending samples of these soaps to the shipping department. If you want to try one, let us know through the comment field of your next order.

Taylor

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About Taylor

I'm a twenty something happy, animal loving, curious experimenter. I love reaching back into history and trying old recipes for cosmetics or foods. I'm constantly asking "Why?" My curiosity has me trying new things. I love taking walks with my dog as well as staying at home to cuddle with the dog and my cats. Some of my favorite scents include Hinoki Wood, Rose Garden, Jasmine and Gladiator.


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