Introduction to Soap Making – Day 10

I am so excited to share today’s soap. Today we will be making soap with Seabuckthorn Oil. Why is this exciting? Seabuckthorn is so potent in color, we will actually be using less than 1% of the oil in our soap! This is really exciting news for soapmakers. This means naturally vibrant colors are achieved with low usage rates. Seabuckthorn is also reputed to have regenerative properties, meaning your skin heals and renews faster.

 

Because our usage rate of Seabuckthorn Oil is so low, we are completing the rest of our 1 oz of luxury oil with another luxury oil. I decided on using Avocado Oil. Avocado Oil contributes small bubbly lather. It is also higher in unsaponifiable oils. This gives the soap a more emollient feeling. Want creamy, luxurious feeling soap? Avocado Oil is a great answer!

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Avocado Oil
Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
26.1 grams Avocado Oil
2.9 grams Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
0.9 oz Avocado Oil
0.1 oz Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
5.62% Avocado Oil
0.62% Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
Finished Soap in Mold
Finished Soap in Mold
Weighed Oils
Weighed Oils
Making Lye Solution
Making Lye Solution
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Pouring Soap into Mold
Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
Introduction to Soap Making - Day 10, 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 rating

6 thoughts on “Introduction to Soap Making – Day 10”

  1. I will be trying this one. It sounds very nice, and I have some Seabuckthorn berry oil I need to use up. The color is screaming citrus EO of some kind.

    VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  2. Does the Seabuckthorn oil have a scent of its own? And can you add other fragrance oil or essential oil to this recipe?

    VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    1. Diana,

      By itself, Seabuckthorn Oil does have a sharp, herbaceous odor. In this recipe, it contributes a barely noticeable sharpness that you really have to sniff in order to detect.

      You can add any fragrance or essential oil of your choice to the recipe.

      Best,
      Taylor

      VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Add Comment Register

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>