Quick Liquid Soap

I had really enjoyed making the Liquid Soap Foot scrub but I wanted to make a liquid soap that you could put in a pump and place at the sink. A more traditional liquid soap so to speak. I also wanted to make this soap using the cold process method. (I still find the hot process method intimidating.) I was really pleased how my first liquid soap turned out and I figure if my method isn’t broken, don’t fix it. :-D Come join me as we make this quick liquid soap!

 

In this recipe, I used Coconut Oil for some lather. I have found that many people have this idea that if there is not any lather, the soap must not be working. Lather seems to be a requirement for any “cleansing” product. It is a good thing Coconut Oil is here to the rescue!

I also used Olive Oil in this formulation. Olive Oil is reputed to be mild on the skin which is part of why 100% Olive Oil soap is so popular. Olive Oil is also an easily found oil in the kitchen. I wanted this recipe to be simple and easy for many soap makers to obtain or even use the ingredients they have on hand.

 

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Water
Potassium Hydroxide
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe: Makes 20 oz of Soap Paste or 40 oz of Liquid Soap

Recipe in Ounces 
6 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
6 oz Water
3.51 oz Potassium Hydroxide
Recipe in Grams
170 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
170 grams Water
99 grams Potassium Hydroxide
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
37.5% Palm Kernel Oil
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Potassium Hydroxide

Weigh the oils into a container. Heat until warm. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Start with very warm temperatures just after heating and mixing lye into water. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved.  I let the soap sit in my beaker while it saponifies. 2 -12 hours after the soap has gone through gel phase, I added 20 oz of water to my soap paste. Mix well. Pour your liquid soap into bottles. Seal, label and enjoy! After all, you just made your own liquid soap!

Taylor

Finished Soap

Weighing Oils

Melted Oils

Adding Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

The soap has heated up, you can even see an air pocket!

Adding Water

Adding Water

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.7/5 (6 votes cast)
Quick Liquid Soap, 4.7 out of 5 based on 6 ratings

27 Comments

  • Deb says:

    Wow, I’ve been wanting to make liquid soap, but haven’t gotten it studied out to well…it looked so complicated to do. This doesn’t sound to complicated at all!!!! Thanks so much, I’ll have to try this once I have my soap room unpacked…if that ever happens, I’m kinda slow getting the basement unpacked and set up. LOL Now I have even more incentive to get it done…so hopefully I can get onto it. :-))

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    • PeePat says:

      I have noticed that there are several liquid foamer soaps on the market that do not list water in the ingredients. They contain saponified coconut, olive and jojoba oils, and sometimes aloe Vera. Can someone please tell me how this is done?! I can formulate my saponified oils using my slow cooker but how can I turn it into liquid without water? Really appreciate any insight!

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
      • Andee says:

        This leads me to believe that the ingredients listing on these soaps are incomplete. There is a possibility for using alcohol to prepare the soap, but even that process uses water.

        I hope this helps!

        VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
      • Tina says:

        Water should be listed. It may be that they are trying to list only what they desire but this is wrong.

        VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
        Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • andrea says:

    Oh Taylor! This is awesome! I can’t wait to give this a try!!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • marija says:

    I’ve never ventured into liquid soapmaking, this is impressive, like others I assumed it a lengthier process! what about curing? is this soap not too harsh to use straight away? M

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • Cheryl says:

    This looks much easier than what I’ve been reading. I’m wondering if it has to cure before use?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • Carolyn in Salt Lake City says:

    AWESOME!! I always thought liquid soap was really hard, I mean difficult! I can’t wait to try this. I suppose any frangrance would work? Blessings, Carolyn

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • Irene says:

    I, too, have been wanting to make liquid soap as some friends prefer to use this rather than a bar soap at the bathroom sink. I will make some tomorrow! The recipe seems incredibly easy and as a soapmaker I already have all the ingredients on hand. Thank you =)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • Whitney says:

    This looks great! I’ll have to try this. Do you have to check to see if it’s neutralized or do anything to make sure everything is saponified before use?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • Mesha says:

    Just what I was looking for!
    I thought liquid soap was all complicated and stuff but this looks so easy!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  • Tami says:

    Wow! Now I really need to try liquid soapmaking! How do you know how long to wait (in reference to the 2-12 hours phrase)? Something to watch for?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    • Taylor says:

      Tami,
      I saw my soap go through gel phase. That is what you are watching for then wait for the soap to cool down. You will then be ready to mix with water and use!

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Emily J Martin says:

    That looks a lot easier than the method I’ve been using! I am going to make some tomorrow :)

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Jamie Greer says:

    Looks like even a beginner like me could handle this!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Edigo says:

    In this recepy you have 2% excess lye, and in your previous liquide soap recipe you had 2% lye discount… Wich one is it supposed to be??

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    • Andee says:

      Personally, I would recommend making liquid soaps with a 0 to 2% excess fat. I’m not sure what reasoning Taylor had for her formulas. I will ask her and we’ll get back to you with our collaborated recommendations.
      Andee

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • jeffrey says:

    i’ve made this recipe a few times now. I am getting some film on the finished product. maybe seperation? does that mean I didn’t add enough water or is there something else it could be?
    also out of curiosity why do most people do hot process for liquid soap making? are there major differences between the end products?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    • Andee says:

      Jeffrey,
      A film on the finished soap is common. This is why many liquid soaps are put in temporary storage containers and then stored for 5-10 days to allow the soap to clear, create the film (which is skimmed off and diluted again), and drop any heavy particulate.

      Most people use hot process because it helps ensure that all the oils are saponified. Potassium soaps don’t produce as much heat as sodium soaps and therefore need the extra heat to ensure saponification. If soaps are made properly, then there shouldn’t be many differences in the finished products.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Cher says:

    Hi there, I am a totally thrilled to have found your posts and also pretty new to liquid soap making. I would really love to give this liquid soap method a try, I do not use palm oil though, could I use rice bran or perhaps sunflower instead? ~ Thanks :-))

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    • Tina says:

      You can use the oils you prefer in any soap recipe. Just recalculate the lye on our Lye Calculator.
      Cheers!
      Tina

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Sherrie says:

    To what temperature do I heat my oils to?
    Do I add the lye solution to the oil right after I mix the lye into the water?
    After I mix the lye solution to the oils do I mix to trace then let it sit for 2-12 hours?

    Thanks for your response, I can’t wait to make this.
    Sherrie

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    • Taylor says:

      Sherrie,

      You will want your oils and your lye solution to both be somewhere between 110F and 130F prior to mixing. This will depend on the temperature of your soaping area. If your soaping area is warm, use cooler temperatures. Once you mix your raw soap to trace, you can allow it to sit for 2-12 hours. If you wait longer, it may be hard to get it out of your soaping container.

      Good luck!

      Taylor

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Gil says:

    Greetings all, I made a liquid soap using your technique, but using Coconut Oil (lather and clarity), Castor Oil (lather and moisturizing properties) and Jojoba Oil (for healing and luxury feel). Once at trace, I wrapped the soaping container in a used towel to help hold in the heat and better saponify the oils. The paste came out a lovely amber color and when mixed with deionized water, retained its color well. We sell this unfragranced as a natural, moisturizing soap.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  • Linda Craig says:

    Thanks for this recipe for cold processed liquid soap . I will be in my test kitchen playing with this tomorrow …. Thanks again

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Leave a Reply