Making Soap with Becky

Three weeks ago, I had a chance to see how Becky from The Spirit Goat makes soap. She operates her own business here in Northern Utah. We made two batches of soap while I asked her questions about her soaps and her business. Naturally, I took several great pictures of the soaps being made! Her specialty is goat’s milk soap and I do have to admit, her milk soaps are fantastic.

The first soap we made was a layered soap for the Fourth of July. Beck actually makes three batches of soap and divides each batch of soap between three molds. She told me that it was easier this way rather than trying to divide her oils into smaller batches to make one soap. These layered soaps are poured into log molds that Becky made specifically for her soaping. Each mold is lined with sheets of heat resistant Mylar before the soap is poured and this helps the soap come out of the mold smoothly. We didn’t use any goat’s milk for this soap, but it still looked great!

Becky made the first batch and heated her oils to about 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Once she had reached her starting temperatures, she used her handy immersion blender and mixed her soap until the soap hit a light trace. Once the soap was at the light trace, she added Ultramarine Blue and a little Black Onyx to color the soap a dark blue as well as her special patriotic fragrance blend. Then Becky divided the raw soap between the three molds and then let it set for about 15 minutes to allow the soap to become firm before pouring the next layer. I had to see how firm it was for myself, so I tipped the mold and the soap didn’t move. Becky told me that she could tip a mold and judge how if it was ready or not.

While the soap was setting, we quickly cleaned the immersion blender and prepared the Titanium Dioxide and fragrance blend. Becky adds a little bit of water to her Titanium Dioxide to ensure there won’t be clumps of white color in the soap. Becky quickly prepared a new batch of oils and heated the oils to 120 degrees Fahrenheit for starting temperatures and mixed this batch of soap until it hit light trace. Now this batch was ready to have the fragrance blend and Titanium Dioxide added. Once again, Becky divided the raw soap between the three molds, but this time she poured the soap into a large soup spoon to prevent the white soap she was pouring from putting dips in layers. The white soap ended being a little thicker than Becky wanted, but it still was fluid. We let the soap sit for 15 minutes to set to the firm point that is desired.

For the last batch, we repeated the same steps as the second batch only adding a red oxide and red mica for the red color. After the soap had been poured into the molds, we set the filled molds aside to make a swirled soap.

The swirled soap is beautiful and has yellow and orange feathery looking swirls. We melted the oils until we reached the starting temperatures of 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Once we had reached the starting temperatures, we mixed the soap until we reached light trace. Once the soap had reached light trace, Becky added the fragrance oil and then after blending that into the soap, the soap was quickly divided into three containers and color was added.

After the color was blended in, Becky started pouring the yellow colored soap into the mold in swirling patterns. She poured about a third of the yellow soap and then started again with the orange soap. Again, she poured about a third of the orange soap into the mold in a swirling pattern. Now she poured a third of the white soap into the mold, still keeping with the swirling pattern. This was repeated three times until the soap was all in the mold. Then, Becky took a small rubber scraper that had the tip bent and told me she used it to pull colors up as well as swirling the soap. She gently pulled the scraper through the soap until she had feathered the color enough.

Becky has been making soap for about 10 years now and it has been something her family has been involved in since the beginning. Her daughters also get to make their own soaps and sell them to promote a charity of their choice every year. I do have to admit, they have some adorable soaps of their own, including snowmen, reindeer, and artwork melt and pour soaps!

I’ve enjoyed visiting Becky’s Soap Kitchen, and I would love to visit yours!

Andee

A picture for an advertisement of Becky's soaps.
A picture for an advertisement of Becky's soaps.
A sample of the patriotic layered soap.
A sample of the patriotic layered soap.
The first layer of soap.
The first layer of soap.
Pouring the white soap over the blue.
Pouring the white soap over the blue.

Waiting for the white soap to set.
Waiting for the white soap to set.

Pouring the red soap over the white.
Pouring the red soap over the white.
Empty silicone mold ready for swirled soap.
Empty silicone mold ready for swirled soap.
More swirls of yellow soap being made.
More swirls of yellow soap being made.
Starting to pour the white soap.
Starting to pour the white soap.
Almost finished pouring the first third of white soap.
Almost finished pouring the first third of white soap.
Starting again with the yellow soap.
Starting again with the yellow soap.
Pouring the second third of orange.
Pouring the second third of orange.
Pouring the last of the yellow soap.
Pouring the last of the yellow soap.
Starting to swirl the soap.
Starting to swirl the soap.
Can you see the swirls starting to form?
Can you see the swirls starting to form?
Finished swirling the soap.
Finished swirling the soap.

Another swirled soap sitting in Becky's Soap Kitchen.
Another swirled soap sitting in Becky's Soap Kitchen.
Allowing the soap to set and cure.
Allowing the soap to set and cure.
Starting to swirl the yellow soap into the mold.
Starting to swirl the yellow soap into the mold.
Starting to pour the orange soap.
Starting to pour the orange soap.
Pouring more white soap.
Pouring more white soap.
Close up of the white soap being poured.
Close up of the white soap being poured.
Yellow soap on top of the previously poured soap.
Yellow soap on top of the previously poured soap.
Pouring the second third of white soap.
Pouring the second third of white soap.
Pouring the last of the orange.
Pouring the last of the orange.
Swirling the soap more.
Swirling the soap more.
More swirls have been formed.
More swirls have been formed.
A look at a finished bar of soap.
A look at a finished bar of soap.

Yet another batch of swirled soap in the soap kitchen.
Yet another batch of swirled soap in the soap kitchen.
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7 thoughts on “Making Soap with Becky”

  1. Beautiful swirls and I love the layered soap too! I am so jealous! But this has definitely given me the drive to work on my swirling techniques. Great Tutorial, thanks!

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  2. Love the swirling! What was used to color the yellow and orange in the swirl? Was it oxides?

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  3. The yellow and orange were colored with oxides and micas, and the white was colored with Titanium Dioxide.

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  4. This is lovely. I can’t wait to try this. And I love her mold! Where would you get a silicone mold so large at? The mold I use is silicone but it’s a much smaller square . I also have trouble cutting mine even. Did she use something to mark out her cuts shown on the blue swirl soap?

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  5. I asked Becky and she said, “The silicone slab liners are from Uplands. http://www.uplandsoapfactory.com. They really are wonderful and very durable.”

    I would look at the slab molds. These molds can come either with or without cut lines. Becky uses molds that have cut lines.

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  6. I did notice the lines after posting. lol. And thanks for posting the site! You are just wonderful Andee!

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