Category Archives: Soap

Coconut Soap

I am in love with coconut. I love the smell and the taste. It speaks of beaches, warm breezes and luxury. It even reminds me of curries! With the cooler weather we have been having, I am ready for a warm sunny day that I can go sit in the sun, drink frozen smoothies and read a book. Since I can’t go out to have fun, I am going to bring it in to me! Come join me all this week for some coconut scented fun! 

As tribute to the fact that I had planned a coconut scented soap, I wanted to use coconut oil. However I had one of the biggest tragedies a soaper can ever run across. I was out of coconut oil! I could not believe it! I have never had that happen before. I was so distraught that I had considered holding off on making this soap but I decided that in light of this tragedy, I definitely needed to bring some sunshine fun to me.

Instead of using Coconut Oil, I decided to use Palm Oil. While it doesn’t create the big, bubbly lather that Coconut Oil does, it does assist with a nice dense, almost creamy lather. I love that really thick lather that just covers your hands.

I also used Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. It contributes hardness to the bar and again dense, creamy lather. It also makes a smooth, hard white bar. I know that our Coconut Fragrance Oil discolors to a tan to light brown color so I wanted to keep it as smooth and as light as possible.

Another oil I used in this formulation was Olive Oil. I really enjoy using Olive Oil. Sometimes a pure Olive Oil soap can feel slimy to me but match it with other oils and I find it dreamy! It creates a dense lather and a conditioning sensation to the skin.

I wanted to use a luxury oil in this recipe. I decided on Shea Butter. Shea Butter is one of my favorite luxury oils for soap. I personally think it adds a creaminess and conditioning that is perfect for this get-away-in-a-bar of Coconut soap. Are you ready to make soap now? Let’s go!

Ingredients
Palm Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Water
Lye
Coconut Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Oil
141.75 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
113.4 grams Olive Oil
28.35 grams Shea Butter, Regular
177 mL Water
69.46 grams Lye
8.5 grams Coconut Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Oil
5 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
6 oz Water
2.07 oz Lye
.3 oz Coconut Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Oil
31% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
25% Olive Oil
6% Shea Butter
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Coconut Fragrance Oil

 

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

Notes: This finished soap had a much denser lather than what I am used to. It was definitely a lot of fun though. This is a perfect soap for felting wool around. If you are curious, check out my post on Wool Wrapped Soap here! They are such fun projects to do!

Taylor

 

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution to melted oils
Adding Lye Solution to melted oils
Mixing Oils and Lye Solution
Mixing Oils and Lye Solution
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Adding Coconut Fragrance Oil to Soap
Adding Coconut Fragrance Oil to Soap
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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Using Snake Oil in Cold Process Soap

Ready for our second day of experimenting with snake oil? I am! Yesterday when we made a hand cream with snake oil, I told you I would also share my snake oil soap experience with you. Let’s go!

After a bit of research, I discovered that the snake oil Jerry had ordered for me had the same saponification value as Emu Oil. That made my lye (sodium hydroxide) calculations easy! I simply used our Lye Calculator and marked my desired amount of snake amount as Emu Oil for the calculation.When I made the soap, I was worried that the “meaty” scent of the snake oil would stay with the soap and make it undesirable. I was lucky! The soap didn’t keep the scent and even heated up to completely gel. The gelling is what caused the “artistic outer space” look of the soaps. It was hard to get a good picture of the soap, but I did a pretty good job!

Let’s go make some snake oil soap!

Soap after being cut.
Soap after being cut.
Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Palm Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Snake Oil (You can use Emu Oil with no difference to the texture of the recipe.)
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I’m using an empty milk carton, quart sized.)
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Palm Oil
5 ounces Coconut Oil
4 ounces Olive Oil
1 ounce Snake Oil
2.3 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water
Recipe in grams:
170.1 grams Palm Oil
141.8 grams Coconut Oil
113.4 grams Olive Oil
28.4 grams Snake Oil
65.2 grams Sodium Hydroxide
177 milliliters Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Palm Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Snake Oil
q.s. Sodium Hydroxide
q.s. Water

*q.s. = Quantity Sufficient. This is an ingredient that needs to have the amount calculated to match the size of batch that you are making.

Making Soap:
Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils on the stove in a double boiler. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace.Pour soap into the desired mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm. The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Soap Notes: This soap had a light “soapy” scent that didn’t change after a few days of curing. The soap had a creamy lather that was mostly small bubbles with a few big bubbles that I made just using my hands. I liked the feeling that the soap left on my skin after washing. I tried this soap on my hands, body and face with no problems! I think I would use this soap as a gift for my elderly family members as I think they would like it most.

What do you think? Would you try this soap?

Weighing the oils to be melted.
Weighing the oils to be melted.
Completely melted oils.
Completely melted oils.
Adding the lye solution to the melted oils.
Adding the lye solution to the melted oils.

My recipe with my notes.
My recipe with my notes.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Carrot Juice Soap

At the beginning of February, I shared a picture of a large carrot with you. I asked if I should make a soap with the carrot. Your responses helped me decide that I would make a soap with carrot juice.

I wanted to make sure that my soap succeeded, so I chose to make the soap using the half and half method. The half and half method is called this because of all your liquids, you use half water, half alternative liquid, and add the alternative liquid half way through the blending of the batch.

Let’s go make some soap!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter, Refined
Water
Carrot Juice from carrots and water
Sodium Hydroxide
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I’m using an empty milk carton, quart sized.)
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
5 ounces Coconut Oil
4 ounces Olive Oil
1 ounces Shea Butter, Refined
3 ounces Water
3 ounces Carrot Juice
2.45 ounces Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
Recipe in grams:
169.9 grams Palm Kernel Oil
141.6 grams Coconut Oil
113.2 grams Olive Oil
28.3 grams Shea Butter, Refined
85 grams Water
85 grams Carrot Juice
69.4 grams Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Palm Kernel Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter, Refined
q.s. Water
q.s. Carrot Juice
q.s. Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)

*q.s. = Quantity Sufficient. This is an ingredient that needs to have the amount calculated to match the size of batch that you are making.

Making Carrot Juice:
I made the carrot juice by chopping the carrot into small chunks and placing the chunks in a blender. I then added approximately 1/4 cup of hot water and turned on the blender. Unfortunately, I learned that the blender I was using doesn’t turn raw carrots and water into carrot juice. :| It took nearly 15 minutes to get 6 ounces of carrot juice! Next time I make carrot juice with a similar blender, I will steam or boil the carrots first and then mix with water in a blender to make carrot juice. (Or use a high quality, high efficiency blender!)

Making Soap:
Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils on the stove in a double boiler. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Add carrot juice. Pour soap into the desired mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm. The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Soap Notes: This soap had a light, clean, and sweet “soapy” scent that was around even after sitting around for a week. The soap color did change to a greenish color, but I still think the soap is very pretty! The soap had a wonderful lather that was a mixture of big and small bubbles that I made just with my hands. I loved the feeling that the soap left on my skin after washing. I tried this soap on my hands, body and face with no problems! I think I’ll make another batch of soap as a gift for my mother-in-law for her birthday!

What do you think? Would you try this soap?

Cut bars of soap.
Cut bars of soap.

Melted oils, lye solution, and carrot juice.
Melted oils, lye solution, and carrot juice.
Pouring the lye solution into the melted oils.
Pouring the lye solution into the melted oils.
Pouring the carrot juice into the raw soap.
Pouring the carrot juice into the raw soap.

After pouring the carrot juice into the raw soap.
After pouring the carrot juice into the raw soap.

Mixing the carrot juice in the raw soap.
Mixing the carrot juice in the raw soap.

Soap poured into the mold.
Soap poured into the mold.

Recipe calculation using the Lye Calculator.
Recipe calculation using the Lye Calculator.
After mixing the carrot juice into the raw soap.
After mixing the carrot juice into the raw soap.

Soap after being removed from the mold.
Soap after being removed from the mold.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Coffee Oil Soap

Okay, I admit I am a complete and total Java junkie. However China is a predominately a tea drinking culture. Don’t get me wrong, I love tea. I just happen to be craving coffee and it kills me because here in a Beijing a simple cup of joe is a little more expensive than what I am used to. By the end of the week, we will have a coffee lovers dream body care basket! So come join me for a good old fashioned coffee fix.

 

I wanted to start this coffee fix goodie basket with a soap. I mean, can you think of a better pick me up than a coffee soap as you groggily stumble into the shower in the morning? I can’t! I think a coffee soap sounds so good I might need to have a bar at every sink, including the ones at work! Yum!

For this recipe, I only used a quarter of an ounce of coffee oil. I thought it would give me a nice strong scent while still allowing the soap to be economical to make. I thought a full ounce of coffee oil would actually be overpowering. Also, only use a quarter of an ounce still made made me comfortable enough to use another luxury oil. Isn’t that great?!

Coffee lovers, take heart! If the expense of the coffee oil has deterred you before, let it no longer! While it seem a little pricy, so little is actually needed that it is actually quiet economical to add to you cupboard. Try some today. You will be glad you did!

I used Palm Kernel Oil so I would have a nice firm bar and lots of wonderful lather. Palm Kernel Oil is one of my favorite oils for soap. I am easily distraught if I have run out! It is a great oil to have on hand. It is also economical. It makes a wonderful bar of soap without making the cost rocket sky high.

Hydrogenated Soybean Oil also helps keep the cost of the soap down. Its benefits are that is is easily found, makes a smooth hard bar. It also makes a beautiful white bar. This contributed to the Latte like color of the soap. Isn’t it beautiful?

Another easily found oil is Olive Oil. I like Olive Oil because it gives a soap a very dense, creamy lather. I always feel like when blended with other oils that have lots of lather, you have the perfect bar. Olive Oil is also conditioning to the skin. Have you ever used a bar of soap that is made just from Olive Oil? Try one! The lather and your skin feel heavenly!

I wanted to use another luxury oil besides the Coffee Oil in this recipe. I decided on Shea Butter. Shea Butter is one of my favorite luxury oils for soap. I personally think it adds a creaminess and conditioning that perfect for the this delectable bar of Coffee Oil soap. Are you ready to make soap now? Let’s go!

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Coffee OilLye (Sodium Hydroxide)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
142 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
21 grams Shea Butter
7 grams Coffee Oil
62 grams Lye
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
0.75 oz Shea Butter
0.25 oz Coffee Oil2.22 oz Lye
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
25% Olive Oil
4.9% Shea Butter
1.6% Coffee OilQ.S. Lye
Q.S. Water

 

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

 

Taylor

Finished Coffee Soap
Finished Coffee Soap
Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils
Heated Oils
Heated Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Curing Soap

20130131-110955.jpgWe get a lot of questions about curing soap. The typical thought of our callers is that soap is dangerous until it has cured for 3 to 6 weeks. This is dangerous thinking! Soap is a fantastic chemical reaction between a fat and an alkali. The resulting product is a synergy of these two items, fat + alkali = soap. In times long ago many items were cleaned with fats. Can you imagine cleaning with fats and oils? Most likely you can’t. We all know how harsh some modern chemical cleaners are, and we often wear gloves when using these types of products. Soap is a wonderful blend which is greater than either of its components, the synergy that sparks our interest and excites our minds.

So, how does one tell when their soap is cured and why is curing needed if the soap is not dangerous? First, it is important to understand the phase we call cure time or curing. This length of time is location and weather dependent. Curing is used to have each bar of soap come to an equilibrium of how much water the soap retains, a balance between soap and atmosphere. Curing is to allow each soap to dry to the fullest extent allowed in each location so the resulting bar can last as long as possible. When using soap that is 24 hours old we know the soap quickly reduces in size because too much soap is being used at each washing, the soap is dissolving too quickly and going right down the drain. Keeping a cured soap dry between uses is important. So, curing is essentially dehydrating. Because we are not adding any other means than maybe a fan in a room with good air circulation we don’t think of this as a mechanical means of dehydrating, but drying is nonetheless what is happening. How does one tell the soap has cured? Easy! Use your scale!

A scale is the most valuable tool we use in making soap. Some would argue that they could never give up their immersion blenders but I will argue that there is nothing to blend until the weight of the oils and fats is known. I’m not the most excited person when thinking of hand stirring a large batch of soap, but I certainly will draw the line that my scale is my most valued lab tool.

So… how do we do this? CURE CARDS to the rescue! We printed a quick reference card to help you with your record keeping. Each pad has 50 sheets of of CURE CARDS, peel one off and use with each batch you are curing. Write the name of the batch and date it was made. Then stack your cut bars to dry. Pin the card down with the lead bar in each curing stack. Weigh that lead soap every few days and record the date and weight. When your soap stops losing weight then your soap is fully cured! These card packs are now in our catalog and can be had for free through our Free Gifts and Teas program. Isn’t this great? I am really excited to share my no-fail method of knowing when a soap is cured. Once your soap has cured, keep this CURE CARD in your records so you will know how long the batch has cured before being wrapped for sale. You do keep records, don’t you?

Tina

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Rating: 5.0/5 (8 votes cast)

Using Lard in Soap, Day Two

I made two batches of soap with lard at the same time, so today we will look at the second batch I made. I didn’t want to change the basic formula other than adding a few extras. So, I made the same formula with only changes in my additives!

Yesterday, Karen asked me if the soap had an odd or bad odor. Well, it smells like peanuts. This is an odd smell, but workable. I definitely wouldn’t use roasted peanut oil. I’ll have to try another batch of soap with different oils to learn about the scent the lard contributes.

At the time I made these soaps I didn’t know if the peanut oil or lard would contribute a scent, so I decided to add Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil and Rhassoul Clay to my second batch. This blended well with the nutty scent and makes a good smelling soap. (Even if it still feels like the soap from yesterday, it just smells better!)

Come join me in the kitchen as I show making a batch of soap with lard!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Lard
Olive Oil
Roasted Peanut Oil (Use regular Peanut Oil instead of Roasted)
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Rhassoul Clay
Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I’m using a wood tissue box cover!)
Immersion Blender
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Lard
6 ounces Olive Oil
6 ounces Roasted Peanut Oil

2.31 ounces Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
7 ounces Water

1 Tablespoon Rhassoul Clay
0.18 ounces Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil (Subtle Fragrance Load at 1%)

Recipe in grams:
170 grams Lard
170 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Roasted Peanut Oil

65.46 grams Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
190 grams Water

1 Tablespoon Rhassoul Clay
5.1 grams Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil (Subtle Fragrance Load at 1%)

Recipe in Percentages
33.33% Lard
33.33% Olive Oil
33.33% Roasted Peanut Oil

q.s. Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
q.s. Water

q.s. Rhassoul Clay
q.s. Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil

*q.s. = Quantity Sufficient. This is an ingredient that needs to have the amount calculated to match the size of batch that you are making.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils on the stove in a double boiler. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Pour soap into the desired mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm. The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Soap Notes: The lather of this soap didn’t change in comparison to the soap I made yesterday, but it was “silkier” in feeling. I loved the feel and I even tried it as a shaving soap. Very nice glide!

What do you think?

Cut bars of soap.
Cut bars of soap.

Measuring the oils.
Measuring the oils.
Mixing the Sodium Hydroxide and water.
Mixing the Sodium Hydroxide and water.
Mixed lye solution.
Mixed lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the oils.
Adding the lye solution to the oils.

Mixing the clay into the raw soap.
Mixing the clay into the raw soap.

Soap in the mold.
Soap in the mold.
After mixing the clay into the raw soap.
After mixing the clay into the raw soap.

Preparing to cut the soap.
Preparing to cut the soap.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Using Lard in Soap, Day One

I’ll admit it, I actually made this soap back in December. However, I wanted to test the soap before I shared my experiences with making the soap. If you recall, I wrote a post about how I rendered my first batch of lard at the end of November. I had planned on making soap with the lard when I first rendered it.

I decided to make a batch of unscented soap using the oils I had on hand. I had a 5 liter jug of Olive Oil as well as a 5 liter jug of Roasted Peanut Oil that Jerry had received as a gift during the Moon Festival (Mid-Autumn Festival). I had been trying to use the Peanut Oil for cooking, but I’m not fond of the taste it gives to everything I cook! I thought soap would be a great alternative for using it. I really recommend using regular peanut oil for any soaps you may want to make instead of roasted peanut oil (unless you get a large jug like me!) ;)

Based on the ingredients I had available to me, I decided to make a batch that used equal portions of the three oils. Come join me in the kitchen as I show making a batch of soap with lard!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Lard
Olive Oil
Roasted Peanut Oil (Use regular Peanut Oil instead of Roasted)
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I’m using a wood tissue box cover!)
Immersion Blender
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Lard
6 ounces Olive Oil
6 ounces Roasted Peanut Oil

2.31 ounces Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
7 ounces Water

Recipe in grams:
170 grams Lard
170 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Roasted Peanut Oil

65.46 grams Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
190 grams Water

Recipe in Percentages
33.33% Lard
33.33% Olive Oil
33.33% Roasted Peanut Oil

q.s. Sodium Hydroxide (6% Superfat)
q.s. Water

*q.s. = Quantity Sufficient. This is an ingredient that needs to have the amount calculated to match the size of batch that you are making.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils on the stove in a double boiler. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Pour soap into the desired mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm. The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Mold Notes: Just because I don’t have access to the blog kitchen, doesn’t mean that I can’t make soap! I made this batch of soap in a wood tissue box cover. I simply lined the the “bottom” of my mold with a sheet of cardboard to keep the bottom of my soap flat. The bottom of my mold was really the top of the tissue box cover! Trust me, molds can be found everywhere!

Soap Notes: This soap dried well. I tried a sliver of the soap right after cutting it as well as again a month after cutting. My opinion is that while the soap feels moisturizing to the hands after washing, it felt a little slimy during use. It didn’t produce much lather until a bath poof was used to create more lather. Even with the bath poof, the lather was dense and small bubbled. If I had the supplies at the time I made the soap, I would make another batch with Coconut or Palm Kernel oils to help make bubbles. Then, I think this would make a great shaving soap!

What do you think?

Cut bars of soap.
Cut bars of soap.

Measuring the oils.
Measuring the oils.
Mixing the Sodium Hydroxide and water.
Mixing the Sodium Hydroxide and water.
Mixed lye solution.
Mixed lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the oils.
Adding the lye solution to the oils.

Blending the raw soap.
Blending the raw soap.

Beginning to cut the soap.
Beginning to cut the soap.

Simply line the "bottom" with a bit of cardboard.
Simply line the “bottom” with a bit of cardboard.
Soap poured into my mold.
Soap poured into my mold.

A tissue box makes a great soap mold!
A tissue box makes a great soap mold!
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Soap and Lip Balm with Ingredients from Thompson’s Cupboard

I hope you have all had a wonderful and safe holiday! I’m glad to be back in the saddle working on more formulas. (I still have a mountain!) Before I continue with today’s post, I have a question for you. Would you like us to continue the “From the Cupboard of” series by making it a monthly event? Let us know what you think!


The first request I received was for a soap recipe. Most of the oils in Thompson’s cupboard are liquid oils, but we can easily work with this! If you would like to add another oil to your cupboard, I would recommend adding Coconut Oil or Palm Kernel Oils. You can follow this link for my recommendations for basic soap making ingredients.

Recipe in ounces:
10 ounces Olive Oil
4 ounces Avocado Oil
2 ounces Shea Butter

2.02 ounces Sodium Hydroxide for 6% Excess Fat
4-6 ounces Water

1 teaspoon Honey (Max amount per pound of oils used)
2 teaspoons Finely Ground Oatmeal (Max amount per pound of oils used)

Recipe in percentages:
62.5% Olive Oil
25% Avocado Oil
12.5% Shea Butter

q.s. Sodium Hydroxide for 6% Excess Fat
q.s. Water

q.s. Honey
q.s. Finely Ground Oatmeal

*q.s. = Quantity Sufficient. This is an ingredient that needs to have the amount calculated to match the size of batch that you are making.

Due to the current cold winter temperatures in the New England area, make this soap with a starting temperatures of approximately 130° F. Make the soap and when you cut it the next day, take a small bar or sliver off the sink and try it out!

I hope you enjoy this soap!


Thompson also requested a lip balm that would help lips in the harsh New England winters. I reformulated my current favorite lip balm that is helping my lips with the windy Beijing winter!

20% Beeswax
10% Castor Oil
25% Apricot Kernel Oil
15% Cocoa Butter
29% Shea Butter
1% Vitamin E


I hope you enjoy these recipes! I have still more formulas that I’m working on! If there is something you would like help with, please feel free to send us a message through the Contact Us page! I’m having fun with all the formulas!

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Soap with Ingredients from Cindy’s Cupboard

I’ve only received one soap request from the Quick Gifts from Your Cupboard blog post

Cindy wrote, “I want to make a soap that has great lathering capability, is long lasting, moisturizing, and feels good on the skin.” As Cindy has a fairly standard soap maker’s cupboard, I decided to make a recipe that used a little bit of Mink Oil as a special luxury oil.

Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Olive Oil
5 ounces Palm Kernel Oil or Coconut Oil
4 ounces Palm Oil or Hydrogenated Soy
1 ounce Mink Oil

2.22 ounces Sodium Hydroxide for 6% Excess Fat
4-6 ounces Water

Recipe in percentages:
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil or Coconut Oil
25% Palm Oil or Hydrogenated Soy
6.25% Mink Oil

q.s. Sodium Hydroxide for 6% Excess Fat
q.s. Water

Due to the current cold winter temperatures in Idaho, make this soap with a starting temperature of 130° F. Any additives of clays or botanicals can be added. I would make a test batch without any additives other than fragrance if desired so you can check the lather. Make the soap and when you cut it the next day, take a small bar or sliver off the sink and try it out!

I hope you enjoy this soap!

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Fragrance Testing Soap Samples Now Shipping in Orders

Our R&D team tests lots of fragrances in cold process soap. Well, we had such a collection of soaps that we were running out of room on the testing lab shelves! So…we cut these soaps into small sample bars to send out with orders. We have over 100 sample soaps in a variety of fragrances.We are sending out soap samples scented with one of the following fragrances; Apple Blossom Queen, Vanilla Yogurt, Bayberry, Gardenia, Tassi Lavender, Tea Leaf & Papaya, Intense Almond, OR Lilac.

Each sample is labeled that it is a test soap as well as the name of the fragrance used for that batch of soap. Like all test batches made in our R&D lab, we follow our Basic Bar Soap Recipe!

Want one of these samples? Request one with your next order and we will try to include one for you! Don’t delay as I know these samples will fly out of here!

Soap samples ready to head to the Shipping Department!

Preparing the soap samples.
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