Archive for the ‘Soap’ Category

Chinese Star Anise Soap

Thursday, July 26th, 2012
There is an early morning market that happens daily in my new neighborhood. Everyone gets up and goes to the market to get fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, grains, tofu, meats and even spices. The Chinese want the freshest products they can get, so it is easy to find produce that was picked just this morning. The prices are very reasonable. I got 1500 grams (3.3 lbs) of green beans for only 5 RMB! This is less than $1 US! It is fun to go to the market to pick the produce I want to use to make dinner each evening.

When I saw the spice vendor, I was impressed by the HUGE pile of Star Anise that was for sale. Anyone could buy as much or as little quantity as wanted. They were having a special sale because they had just brought in a new crop of the Star Anise. Spend 3 RMB ($0.50) and get 50 grams or spend 10 RMB ($1.60) and get 200 grams. Seeing this pile of Star Anise inspired me to make a batch of soap for those hunters and fishers as it is in the middle of summer. Come join me in the kitchen to make Chinese Star Anise soap!

 

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Shea Butter
Olive Oil
Palm Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams 
227 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Shea Butter
113 grams Olive Oil
454 grams Palm Oil
128 grams Sodium Hydroxide
340 grams Water
7 grams Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Recipe in Ounces
8 ounces Coconut Oil
4 ounces Shea Butter
4 ounces Olive Oil
16 ounces Palm Oil
4.51 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
12 ounces Water
0.25 ounces Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Recipe in Percentages
25% Coconut Oil
12% Shea Butter
12% Olive Oil
49% Palm Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide
Q.S. Water
1% Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil

 

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil. Stir well. Pour soap into the desired mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm. The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

 

Note: We noticed that the cut soap had a beautiful white swirly color to it when we first cut it due to the stearines in the fats.

Buying Chinese Star Anise at the Market

Chinese Star Anise

Weighing Oils

Mixing Lye

Mixing Oils and Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Adding Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil

Soap in Molds

Cut soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Face Scrub with Liquid Soap – Day 2

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012
Yesterday, we made a liquid soap paste. Today we will turn that base into a nice scrub for the face. You can even use this method to create a mask! Let’s head to the kitchen!I added water to the soap paste to make it softer and smoother but I also wanted a very thick and viscous scrub. Traditionally when making liquid soap, for 16 ounces of oils, 24 or more ounces of water are added. I only added 14 ounces of water.

 

I added Ground Apricot Seeds for the exfoliant. It is very fine and at a lower usage rate, it perfect for a face or even body scrub.

Collect Needed Items

Ingredients
Liquid Soap Paste
Ground Apricot Seeds
Water
Equipment
Scale
Containers
Plastic Bag

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
All of yesterday’s Liquid Soap Paste
1.75 oz Ground Apricot Seeds
14 oz Water
Recipe in Grams
All of yesterday’s Liquid Soap Paste
50 grams Ground Apricot Seeds
397 grams Water
Recipe in Percentages
90% Liquid Soap Paste
10% Ground Apricot Seeds
Q.S. Water

Scoop the soap paste into a plastic bag. Add the Ground Apricot Seeds and two ounces of water. Close the bag and knead until the water is completely mixed in. Add the water a little bit at a time and mix it in completely. Repeat until all of the water has been incorporated. Package into containers. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Scrub

Mixed Soap

Weighing Ground Apricot Seeds

Soap and Ground Apricot Seeds

Mixing Scrub

Mixing Scrub

Scrub ready to put into jars

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Face Scrub With Liquid Soap – Day 1

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012
I wanted to make a face scrub that would be perfect for cleansing and exfoliating the face. I could have used one of our bases but I wanted to dip my toes into the world of Liquid Soap. I have seen a lot of people make their soap using the Hot Process method but I wasn’t feeling ready for a complete revamping of my soaping style. Today we will be making a liquid soap using the cold process method so we can prepare for this scrub. Come join me!

 

I chose some oils to create some lather. I wanted the base to have some lather when you rub it into the skin. These are some of my favorite types of face scrubs. One of the first oils I chose for this soap base was coconut oil. Coconut oil is a wonderful oil to have in your soaping cupboard and mine in the blog kitchen is no exception! It adds lather to your soaps and great tactile properties to lip balms, scrubs and lotions.

I also used Olive Oil. Olive Oil also contributes a smoother moisturizing feel to the soap. When making a product for the face, it is important to be gentle to the delicate skin of the face. It is also important to moisturize to keep the skin soft, supple and healthy.

We will make this liquid soap paste  today and then tomorrow we will use this base to create a nice scrub for the face.

Collect Needed Items

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Sesame Oil
Potassium Hydroxide
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Coconut Oil
6 oz Olive Oil
4 oz Sesame Oil
3.25 oz Potassium Hydroxide
6 oz Water
Recipe in Grams
170 grams Coconut Oil
170 grams Olive Oil
113 grams Sesame Oil
92 grams Potassium Hydroxide
170 grams Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Coconut Oil
37.5% Olive Oil
25% Sesame Oil
Q.S. Potassium Hydroxide
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a container. Heat until warm. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Allow the lye solution to cool. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. I let the soap sit in my beaker while it saponifies as tomorrow, we will be adding to it. Cover your container with plastic wrap and allow to sit until the oils have completely saponified.

Taylor

Liquid Oils

Oils and Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

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Rating: 3.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Sea Glass Inspired Soap Challenge: Judy’s Sea Glass Soap

Monday, May 21st, 2012
Remember the Sea Glass Inspired Soap Challenge? Friday was the deadline for entries to be submitted and today I’ll start sharing the entries for this challenge.

Today’s guest post is from Judy. She had a perspective on sea glass soap that I hadn’t considered and I found myself loving her soap for the difference. I hope you enjoy her soap as much as I do.

Judy's Sea Glass soap.

I was really inspired by this challenge. I love sea glass and my “go to” necklace I wear nearly every day is made with it. I had recently done some experimental bars to test out some new micas and this was a perfect application for them.

First I used a cheese planer (my grandmother’s!) to cut strips to make the glass embeds. I also chopped up some purplish/mauve soap to make little pebbles. And I added some poppy seeds to represent sand:

Cutting the soap to make sea glass shaped embeds.

My sea glass shaped soaps, soap pebbles and poppy seeds.

I made my soap batter and divided it into two parts. About 70% I colored with black oxide and titanium dioxide to represent the beaches and the sand. The remainder I colored with blue and green micas and a titanium dioxide swirl to represent the surf. I worked at pretty thick trace to keep everything suspended. Here it is in the mold. I textured the top to look like waves:

Soap in the mold.

And here are some pictures of it unmolded. I wanted just a few pieces to show in each bar as sea glass is not too common. As the soap is used, more glass will be revealed.

Finished soap.

Another view of the finished soap.

The soap was scented with an EO blend of rosemary, lavender, lemongrass, eucalyptus radiata and cedar. I tried for an ocean/water type scent. I like the blend.

thanks!

Judy

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Rating: 5.0/5 (6 votes cast)

Single Oil Soap – Castor Oil – Day 2

Thursday, April 26th, 2012
Today I wanted to make the castor oil soap with no volcano. How does that sound? I am pretty excited to see how it turns out. Let’s head to the test kitchen and make sure our thermometer is handy!

 

To be on the safe side, I decided to not heat the castor oil and just leave it a room temperature. When I tested the temperature, it showed to be 69° F. I mixed my lye solution and gave it time to cool. When I went to mix my soap, the lye was 96° F. I didn’t have any volcanos or temperature problems. Yay! I love it when things work the way they are should!

 

I learned that castor oil is a temperature sensitive oil when making soap. Even with the much cooler temperatures, when I reached trace, it was like a thick pudding after having been chilled. I poured the soap into the mold. Later when I washed with the finished soap, I liked how creamy and smooth it felt but there weren’t any suds. One thing I have noticed is many people relate the amount of suds with how clean something is.

Needed Materials

Ingredients
Castor Oil
Lye
Water
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Mold

Recipe

Recipe in Grams
454 grams Castor Oil
55 grams Lye
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
16 oz Castor Oil
1.93 oz Lye
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
100% Castor Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water

Weigh the Castor Oil into a container. Heat until warm. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Allow the lye solution to cool. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Enjoy!

Taylor

 

Finished Soap

Adding Lye Solution to Oil

Mixing Oil and Lye Solution

Mixing Oil and Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Single Oil Soap – Castor Oil – Day 1

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012
Yesterday I talked a little about Castor Oil. As I haven’t yet featured Castor Oil as a single oil soap, I thought we could fix that today. Are you ready to learn what castor oil contributes to you soap? Let’s head to the kitchen and find out!I had a little whoops when making the Single Castor Oil soap. I heated the castor oil in the microwave for two minutes. I stirred my lye into my water and without letting either cool, I mixed them together. A separate test told me my castor oil would have been about 200° F and my lye solution about 170° F. I had a volcano in my mixing beaker! I was to busy jump back to get any decent photos of the action but it sure made a mess!What was really amazing to me is that the soap was so hot it started to gel on the counter! I have never seen a soap do that. I certainly relearned the importance of checking your temperatures! I also learned that 5 minutes of letting things cool is much better than 15 minutes of cleaning up hot soap! Egads! I think I forgot my brain today!

Needed Materials

Ingredients
Castor Oil
Lye
Water
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Mold

Recipe

Recipe in Grams
454 grams Castor Oil
55 grams Lye
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
16 oz Castor Oil
1.93 oz Lye
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
100% Castor Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water

Weigh the Castor Oil into a microwave safe container. Heat until warm. This took about 2 minutes for me. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Step back watch volcano. Scrape into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Enjoy!

Taylor

 

Soap Scraped into Mold

Weighed Oil

Adding Lye Solution

Mixing Oil and Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Watching Volcano

Scraping Soap off of counter

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Single Oil Soap – Golden Jojoba Oil

Monday, April 9th, 2012
I wanted to start this week off by a very interesting single oil soap. Let’s take a look a Jojoba Oil. Jojoba is a liquid wax that is harvested from a desert shrub. This oil is very different because it is also fairly stable. Let’s go see what happens when we make a Jojoba Oil Soap!

 

I really struggled to get this soap to trace. It seemed to take forever. Granted, ten minutes is not forever but compared to most soap I make, that is a long time to spend mixing. I poured it into the soap mold and let it sit for 24 hours. When I came back, it had separated! Frustrated, I went to got talk to Tina in out Technical Support Department. I learned that Jojoba has a lot on non-saponifiable oils and that this is why it had separated. I hadn’t done anything wrong, it was just the nature of the oil.

When I went to the sink to test this soap it started off feeling oily. There were not any suds or even an occasion bubble. It did feel very creamy and while I was using it, I thought how it might make a nice scrub. I did notice that the soap after being made, had a funny, smokey, herbaceous odor to it. Not bad, just not something I would use a fruity scent with.

I would make a scrub with this soap. I would add either salt or sugar and stir well 24 hours after the soap had been made. With this type of scrub, you get the benefit of a soap, a scrub and a massage oil! The un-saponified oils would get to stay behind after a good cleaning and exfoliation. I might even make a soap that is half Coconut, half Jojoba soap. That would be fun, what do you think?

Needed Materials

Ingredients
Jojoba Oil
Lye
Water
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Mold

Recipe

Recipe in Grams
454 grams Jojoba Oil
28 grams Lye
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
16 oz Jojoba Oil
0.99 oz Lye
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
100% Jojoba Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water

Weigh the Jojoba Oil into a microwave safe container. Heat until warm. This took about 3 minutes for me. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oil and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Enjoy!

Taylor

 

Finished Soap

Heated Golden Jojoba Oil

Mixing Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Single Oil Soap – Hydrogenated Soybean Oil

Thursday, April 5th, 2012
What have you thought about the single oil soaps? Have you learn a lot? I know I have. I wanted to test another highly popular oil in soap making. Today I will be testing Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Come join me in the test kitchen for this next single soap!

 

I didn’t have any problems when mixing this soap. It went smoothly with no accelerated trace. When I went to cut my soap after 24 hours, it was very firm. It also crumbled a little when I cut the soap. It made a nice hard, white creamy bar.

When I went to the sink to test this soap it was very creamy. There were some bubbles but not anything I would classify as lather. I do like how hard the soap was but I am not a fan of how it crumbled when I cut it. Otherwise, I think it made an excellent bar of soap that cleaned and was also creamy. What do you think of a bar like this?

 

Needed Materials

Ingredients
Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
Lye
Water
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Mold

Recipe

Recipe in Grams
454 grams Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
58 grams Lye
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
16 oz Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
2.04 oz Lye
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
100% Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water

Weigh the Hydrogenated Soybean Oil into a microwave safe container. Heat until warm. This took about 3 minutes for me. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Enjoy!

Taylor

 

Finished Soap

Hydrogenated Soybean Oil

Mixing Lye Solution

Mixing Oils and Lye

Mixing Soap

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Single Oil Soap – Olive Oil

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

 

I wanted to continue our learning adventure with the single oil soaps. I was really enjoying what I was learning and I wanted to know more. I decided to try Olive Oil today. I have seen and heard of Olive Oil Soap before, but I have never made it and it has been a really long time since I have tested a bar. I wanted to know more. Come join me in the kitchen as we make an Olive Oil Soap! 

I didn’t have any problems when mixing this soap. It went smoothly with no accelerated trace. When I went to cut my soap after 24 hours, it was still very soft. I talked to one of the gals on the Tech Support Team and she told me that my temperatures were not hot enough. My olive oil was about 120° F. As my temperatures were fairly low, I will have to wait 6 to 8 weeks to allow the soap to cure! Big note to self: When making Olive Oil Soap, have higher temperatures.

When I went to the sink to test this soap it was really creamy. There were occasional bubbles but not anything I would classify as lather. Part of this is due to the slow saponification of the olive oil. I think a soap with 12 oz of Olive Oil and 4 oz of either Palm Kernel Oil or Coconut Oil would be really nice. This way you get the dense lather from the olive oil and the big volume lather from the Palm Kernel Oil or the Coconut Oil. What do you think? Should we try a soap like that?

Needed Materials

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
Water
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Spoons
Mold

Recipe

Recipe in Grams
454 grams Olive Oil
58 grams Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
16 oz Olive Oil
2.04 oz Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
100% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the Olive Oil into a microwave safe container. Heat until warm. This took about 2 1/2 minutes for me. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Enjoy!

 

Taylor

Attempting to cut soap

Olive Oil

Mixing Lye Solution

Adding the Lye Solution to the Olive Oil

Mixing the Lye and Olive Oil

Mixing Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in the mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Single Oil Soap – Sweet Almond Oil

Friday, March 30th, 2012
Sweet Almond Oil. I consider Sweet Almond Oil to be one of my staple oils for making lip balms and lotions. I wanted to test this oil next to see what it would contribute to a bar of soap. I have never made a soap with Sweet Almond before and wondered if it might be a staple in a soap makers cabinet. Let’s go make a Sweet Almond Oil Soap!

 

I didn’t have any problems when mixing this soap. It went smoothly with no accelerated trace. This soap has stayed soft. When I went to wash with it, I was surprised how creamy it was before I turned on the faucet. I turned on the water and the soap reminded me a lot of the Cocoa Butter soap without being a solid bar. Very creamy, not so strong in the cleansing field, but there was an occasional bubble. So, the decision on Almond Oil is to limit it to 1 to 2 oz in each pound of fat.

Needed Materials

Ingredients
Sweet Almond Oil
Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
Water
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Spoons
Mold

Recipe

Recipe in Grams
454 grams Sweet Almond Oil
57 grams Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
16 oz Sweet Almond Oil
2.02 oz Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
6 oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
100% Sweet Almond Oil
Q.S. Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the Sweet Almond Oil into a microwave safe container. Heat until warm. This took about 2 1/2 minutes for me. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Enjoy!

 

Taylor

Finished Soap

Heated Oil

Mixing Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution

Mixing Lye Solution and Oil

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)