Category Archives: Soap

Soap with Ingredients from Cindy’s Cupboard

I’ve only received one soap request from the Quick Gifts from Your Cupboard blog post

Cindy wrote, “I want to make a soap that has great lathering capability, is long lasting, moisturizing, and feels good on the skin.” As Cindy has a fairly standard soap maker’s cupboard, I decided to make a recipe that used a little bit of Mink Oil as a special luxury oil.

Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Olive Oil
5 ounces Palm Kernel Oil or Coconut Oil
4 ounces Palm Oil or Hydrogenated Soy
1 ounce Mink Oil

2.22 ounces Sodium Hydroxide for 6% Excess Fat
4-6 ounces Water

Recipe in percentages:
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil or Coconut Oil
25% Palm Oil or Hydrogenated Soy
6.25% Mink Oil

q.s. Sodium Hydroxide for 6% Excess Fat
q.s. Water

Due to the current cold winter temperatures in Idaho, make this soap with a starting temperature of 130° F. Any additives of clays or botanicals can be added. I would make a test batch without any additives other than fragrance if desired so you can check the lather. Make the soap and when you cut it the next day, take a small bar or sliver off the sink and try it out!

I hope you enjoy this soap!

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Fragrance Testing Soap Samples Now Shipping in Orders

Our R&D team tests lots of fragrances in cold process soap. Well, we had such a collection of soaps that we were running out of room on the testing lab shelves! So…we cut these soaps into small sample bars to send out with orders. We have over 100 sample soaps in a variety of fragrances.We are sending out soap samples scented with one of the following fragrances; Apple Blossom Queen, Vanilla Yogurt, Bayberry, Gardenia, Tassi Lavender, Tea Leaf & Papaya, Intense Almond, OR Lilac.

Each sample is labeled that it is a test soap as well as the name of the fragrance used for that batch of soap. Like all test batches made in our R&D lab, we follow our Basic Bar Soap Recipe!

Want one of these samples? Request one with your next order and we will try to include one for you! Don’t delay as I know these samples will fly out of here!

Soap samples ready to head to the Shipping Department!

Preparing the soap samples.
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Rating: 4.5/5 (2 votes cast)

Rendering Lard

If you remember, last week I posted a teaser photoof my first batch of rendered lard. I had so much fun with this project and I haven’t even gotten to make soap yet!I referenced our Soapmaker’s Forum as well as Punk Domestics and A Little Bit of Spain in Iowa. All three sources were extremely helpful in this project and I thank them for their help!

To begin my project, I started storing the fat that came with the pork meat I purchase on a “almost” daily basis for our meals. Here in China, the butchers block of any grocery store is open to the customers. Unlike grocery stores in the USA that have the big enclosed cases, grocery stores here allow you to sort through and pick your favorite cut of meat. Using wooden “tongs”, you can simply pick up and examine each piece of meat before deciding to keep it or not. (It has taken me a while to get used to this process and some days I still can’t buy meat!)

The most common meat pieces that I purchase are pork loin with the backfat and skin still attached. The Chinese feel that the best meat is something that has a a fair amount of fat. I trim most of the fat (and all of the skin) off our meat and instead of throwing it away, I bag and then store it in the freezer. When I ran out of room in the freezer, I had 2-1/2 gallon-sized freezer bags stuffed with pork backfat.

Time to render! I began by pulling the bags of fat and set them on the counter to defrost. It took about 2 hours for the backfat to thaw enough for me to cut it up easily. Once the backfat had thawed, I started cutting the slabs into small chunks. I used a Chinese style meat cleaver and a small paring knife on my bamboo cutting board. It took me 2 hours to cut all of the backfat into small-ish chunks and I had a few blisters by the time I was done. I think a meat grinder would make this task easier.

If you are going to render your own fat, I would HIGHLY recommend grinding into small chunks or if you purchase from a butcher to have the butcher grind the fat before you take it home. I promise it will save you time as well as your hands! As I can’t communicate well with my butcher so I chopped up the fat by hand. :)

When all the backfat was cut up I had a completely full pot, and silly me, I forgot to weigh the backfat and skin before I started the rendering process. I estimate that I had around 5 to 6 pounds of back fat when I started. I added 1/2 cup of water to the pot and turned on the stove. Since my gas stove has three options of heat (hot as Hades, “I’m thinking about medium-low”, and “Oh! I’m on?”), I turned the heat to what my stove considers medium-low.

As this was my first time rendering, I was nervous about things turning out right. I stayed in the kitchen working on other projects while the pot heated and slowly, the lard began to melt. I stirred approximately every 15 minutes while the lard melted. When I could see and scoop out the liquid lard, I began to do so. I poured the lard into a glass water pitcher that had a brand new knee-high nylon hose stretched across the mouth of the pitcher. This allowed me to filter the liquid lard easily.

I reached a point where it seemed that only the biggest chunks were left and the stove wasn’t “quite” producing enough heat. I pulled out my stick blender and used it in the pot to help break down the chunks. Once the chunks were tiny pieces, I stopped blending and let the stove continue working on the smaller pieces in the pot. The process seemed to speed up and the lard floated on the top easily.

The overall time spent cooking on the stove was about 4 hours. I used a total of 2 pairs of brand new nylon hose to filter all my lard. (I really don’t care about that since I rarely wear nylon knee-high hose and I keep it on hand more for cooking than wearing.) I ended up with 75 ounces of rendered lard once the process was over. I didn’t keep the “cracklings” because I had the last portion of lard filter by gravity over night by hanging the filled hose over a clean pot to drip the last of the lard.

Now on to the questions!

Reader: What is the purple coloring on some of the pieces in your pictures?
Andee: That is a food safe ink that is used to mark meats at slaughter houses, processing plants and butcher’s shops. These marks help determine the which animal it is as well as helping create a paper trail through the process of butchering.

Reader: What exactly is the difference between lard and tallow?
Andee: The difference between these two fats is that lard is rendered pig fat and tallow is rendered beef fat. Lard is used for frying, baking and soapmaking. Tallow is used for frying or soapmaking. I’m sure some of our readers can also give us other examples of uses for these two fats.

Reader: After rendering, are you going to soap with your lard?
Andee: Absolutely! I’m currently formulating recipes to work with the ingredients I have on hand.

Reader: I love using soap made with lard, but I can still smell the “piggy” odor and I can no longer use my soap due to the smell. Any suggestions?
Andee: The smell can vary depending on the type of lard you have as well as the percentage of excess fat in the soap batch. I have read suggestions of adding baking soda or bay leaves to the pot during the rendering process to lighten odors, but I don’t know if it works. If you still have some of the soap and it bothers you, I can recommend gifting the soap or even donating to a local food pantry or shelter.

Reader: What benefit does using animal fats in soap have over not using animal fats?
Andee: It is simply a matter of preference. Some people like using lard or tallow in soap and others prefer to not use it. I enjoy soaps of both types. As soap isn’t a leave-on-product, I’m not sure if there are any skin benefits.

I also got a lovely e-mail from Dianne P. with tips from her experiences of rendering lard. It was so nice, that I just had to share the whole thing with you!

I just thought I would share a tip. I render my own lard & also buy some. When I render it, I keep it in the freezer as it spoils faster. I start with ground fat (not chunks). I use a big roaster, outside, as it is smelly. I probably do 15# at once. I keep stirring it off & on. When the “cracklings” are brown, we strain the lard in cheesecloth. It will be a nice white color. Makes a big mess (when I do it)!

I guess the “store-bought” kind is sterilized or something to keep it fresh. I keep it on my shelf.

I enjoy your blogs & posts!
thank you,

Diane P.

Do you have any questions about rendering lard? Do you have questions about soaping with lard? I would love to hear your questions and help you find answers! Even if you just have a comment to share, I would love to hear them!

Backfat with skin attached and waiting to be chopped into small pieces.
Using a meat cleaver to chop the backfat.
Pile of chopped backfat.
Stirring the pot of melting backfat.
Using an immersion blender to break up the larger chunks into small pieces to allow faster melting.
Stirring the pot again!
Removing the oil floating on top.
Strained lard that is still hot.

Completely cooled lard.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Silk Soap – Cultivated Silk

I wanted to try my hand at a soap with silk. A soap with silk entails that you put some silk fiber into the lye solution prior to mixing your soap. The lye causes the silk to dissolve, allowing the silk protein to move throughout the entire soap. I am not sure if the silk adds anything to the soap besides great marketing. Come join me in the kitchen for some silk soap! 

For this recipe, I used our basic soap recipe for testing. We use Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Coconut Oil and Olive Oil. I find this results in a nice firm bar that has wonderful lather. After all, why fix something if it isn’t broken.

In this recipe, I tested using Cultivated Silk. My local yarn store help me choose some different fibers and also explained the difference. Cultivated silk is where the silk worms have been raised in a “farm”. Silk worms that are harvested from the wild produce what is called Tussah Silk. I think it might be interesting to compare the two, but for today we will stick with the Cultivated Silk.

Ingredients
Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Water
Lye
Silk Fiber, Cultivated
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
170 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
177 mL Water
65 grams Lye
0.4 grams Silk Fiber, Cultivated
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
6 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
6 oz Water
2.31 oz Lye
0.015 oz Silk Fiber, Cultivated
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated
37.5% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Silk Fiber, Cultivated

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Add the silk to the lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

Note: When I added the silk to my lye solution, I had to stir in order to get it to dissolve. I would recommend that you cut the fiber into smaller pieces prior to adding it to the lye solution. This will make it easier to dissolve, however, I expect it will still need to be stirred.

Taylor

Finished Soap
Weighing Oils
Collected Ingredients
Adding Silk to Lye Solution
Stirring In Silk
Silk Attaching to Spoon
Silk Lye Solution
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Soap in Mold
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Rating: 5.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Starting with an Empty Cupboard: Basic Soapmaking Ingredients

Yesterday, I started the Empty Cupboard series with my basic equipment and containers. I’m really beginning to enjoy looking at what I consider necessities and what I consider fun additions. Handmade soap is one of those things I can’t bring myself to live without so I put together a soapmaking ingredients wishlist!

Let’s take a peek at my soapmaking ingredients wishlist!

Required Oils: These are the oils that I feel are the important base oils for any soapmaker. I feel these oils make great soaps without severe expenses.

Coconut Oil: Due to marketing efforts over the years, people have been taught that unless soap has lots bubbles their bodies aren’t getting clean. To give a soap this desired lather factor we use Coconut Oil. Want a dual purpose oil? Coconut Oil also will make a very hard bar of soap. We typically use between 20 and 30% of Coconut Oil in a batch of soap, however, not all soaps we make will have this percentage range as Coconut Oil.

Palm Kernel Oil: In the blog kitchen, we use Coconut Oil and Palm Kernel Oil interchangeably because they give the finished bar of soap similar lather, color and firmness. Palm Kernel Oil will make a very hard bar and does not contribute any color to the finished bar of soap. I have used both Palm Kernel and Coconut in a bar of soap and found that recipe was my favorite, but you don’t have to use both oils in the same recipe.

Palm Oil: This oil is one of the more universal oils and contributes firmness to soap along with a straw color. Many people refer to this oil as vegetable tallow and frequently use it as a filler oil. Many luxury soaps use Palm Oil because it gives soap a special texture and color.

Hydrogenated Soybean Oil: I regard Hydrogenated Soybean Oil as one of those oils that help reduce the costs of the ingredients as well as an oil that contributes to the hardness of the final bar of soap. The soap will be firm, white and have a creamy texture.

Olive Oil: We recommend Olive Oil in soaps for many reasons. It is easy to find in most kitchens and grocery stores so you can make soap at 2 in the morning if you desire! It also contributes a dense “cream” to the lather that helps give a stable foundation for the large bubbles from the Coconut or Palm Kernel Oils. Olive Oil is a slow to trace oil that helps slow things down without making a soap prone to stalling so it can extend the working time of the raw soap. Soaps made with Olive Oil are also noted to be mild and soothing on skin which makes it a favorite ingredient of many soapmakers.

Luxury Addition Oils: My choices are just two of the many potential oils that I feel can give a soap a little extra “Oomph.” I only add a small amount of these luxury or splurge oils to a single batch of soap so they are still a cost effective addition to soap.

Avocado Oil: Most of the soapmakers on our staff recommend Avocado Oil as a luxury oil because soaps made with this oil are dreamy. The smooth glide, gentle cleansing and the creamy lather is a great addition to any soap. I particularly like this oil in any baby soap recipe! We recommend a small amount of this oil per batch, 3 to 12.5% per batch which is 0.5 to 2 ounces in every lb of fats.

Lanolin: I think any soap made with Lanolin is just fantastic on the skin. Lanolin soaps give my skin a moisturized feeling that just can’t be beat! Lanolin is actually a wax that is quick to saponify so we only recommend using a little bit of Lanolin per batch. Usually we use 1/2 to 1 ounce per pound of fats per batch of soap. Lanolin contributes a dense lather and a silky feeling to the skin when used as a luxury oil in a soap.

Tomorrow we will take a look at the basics for making lotions and creams!

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Quick Liquid Soap

I had really enjoyed making the Liquid Soap Foot scrub but I wanted to make a liquid soap that you could put in a pump and place at the sink. A more traditional liquid soap so to speak. I also wanted to make this soap using the cold process method. (I still find the hot process method intimidating.) I was really pleased how my first liquid soap turned out and I figure if my method isn’t broken, don’t fix it. :-D Come join me as we make this quick liquid soap!

 

In this recipe, I used Coconut Oil for some lather. I have found that many people have this idea that if there is not any lather, the soap must not be working. Lather seems to be a requirement for any “cleansing” product. It is a good thing Coconut Oil is here to the rescue!

I also used Olive Oil in this formulation. Olive Oil is reputed to be mild on the skin which is part of why 100% Olive Oil soap is so popular. Olive Oil is also an easily found oil in the kitchen. I wanted this recipe to be simple and easy for many soap makers to obtain or even use the ingredients they have on hand.

 

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Water
Potassium Hydroxide
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe: Makes 20 oz of Soap Paste or 40 oz of Liquid Soap

Recipe in Ounces 
6 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
6 oz Water
3.51 oz Potassium Hydroxide
Recipe in Grams
170 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
170 grams Water
99 grams Potassium Hydroxide
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
37.5% Palm Kernel Oil
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Potassium Hydroxide

Weigh the oils into a container. Heat until warm. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Start with very warm temperatures just after heating and mixing lye into water. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved.  I let the soap sit in my beaker while it saponifies. 2 -12 hours after the soap has gone through gel phase, I added 20 oz of water to my soap paste. Mix well. Pour your liquid soap into bottles. Seal, label and enjoy! After all, you just made your own liquid soap!

Taylor

Finished Soap
Weighing Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
The soap has heated up, you can even see an air pocket!
Adding Water

Adding Water
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Rating: 4.4/5 (7 votes cast)

Soy Milk Soap

Soy milk is a major part of Chinese life. Unlike life in Utah, soy milk can be found EVERYWHERE! I’m not even talking about shelf stable cartons of sweetened soy milk found at the grocery store. Here in China, soy milk isn’t worth considering unless it is fresh, hot and steaming. Want sweeter soy milk? You can add your desired amount of sugar right from a big bowl of sugar.

 

 

One of my favorite soaps while I’ve been in China has been my batch of unscented soy milk soap that I made before coming to China. I decided to remake the batch of soy milk soap with one change. This time I decided to add a little bit of Elements of Bamboo Fragrance as it is a nice scent that appreciated by my friends and family who come to visit. I decided to use a light usage rate so it wouldn’t overwhelm or offend any of the noses of my visitors.

 Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Soy Milk
Water
Elements of Bamboo Fragrance
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Extra Large Square Tray Mold
Square Tray Mold
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
1134 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
567 grams Coconut Oil
567 grams weight Olive Oil
315 grams Sodium Hydroxide
444 mL Soy Milk
444 mL Water
21 grams Elements of Bamboo Fragrance
Recipe in Ounces
40 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
20 ounces weight Coconut Oil
20 ounces weight Olive Oil
11.1 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
15 fluid ounces Soy Milk
15 fluid ounces Water
0.75 ounces Elements of Bamboo Fragrance
Recipe in Percentages
50% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide
Q.S. Soy Milk
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Elements of Bamboo Fragrance

Time spent:

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 3 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding milk to the batch: 20 seconds
Using immersion blender to completely mix milk into soap: 40 seconds
Pour into molds: 60 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

 

1) Calculate the amount of lye and liquid needed for the oils you plan to use.

2) Measure all of the oils and set aside to heat gently.

3) Measure the lye and set aside.

4) Measure HALF of the needed liquid as water and set aside. Measure HALF of the needed liquid as soy milk and set aside. Milk should be room temperature, not frozen or hot.

5) Add ALL of the lye to the water. Stir well. No crystals should remain on the bottom of your mixing vessel. When the temperature of this lye solution is within 110° F to 130° F, (cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter, cooler for large batches and warmer for small batches), add it to the oil mixture. Blend with an immersion blender until you estimate you are halfway through the mixing process. This will happen with most oils in about 1 minute. The mixture should NOT be thick or viscous. The mixture should be very fluid, like water.

6) Now steadily pour the milk into the batch. Use the immersion blender to finish the blending so there is no chance of separation.

7) Add fragrance. Pour into prepared SHALLOW molds (1 inch deep or so). Milk soaps can get very hot and shallow molds help the excess heat dump into the air. This will prevent the milk sugars from interrupting the saponification reaction.

Finished Soap
Weighing Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution
Mixing Soap
Measuring Soy Milk
Mixed Soap
Adding Soy Milk
Mixed Milk Soap
Adding Fragrance Oil

Soap In Mold
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Rating: 4.7/5 (7 votes cast)

Egg Soap

Recently my husband was teaching me how to make Tomato Eggs, a Chinese dish that is common for lunch or dinner. As I learned to cook a new dish, I couldn’t help but wonder how a soap would turn out if you added an egg. Would it affect the lather? Make a bar of soap pamper the skin more? Make a better shampoo bar? To answer these questions, I decided that I should make a batch of soap with an egg.

 

Since I know eggs mix really well with oil due to my experience baking, I decided to remove 2 ounces of oil to mix with my egg. This mixture I will add when light trace begins. By adding the egg at this point, I prevent the burning of the egg proteins and acceleration of the soap.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Water
Sodium Hydroxide
Large Chicken Egg
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
227 grams Hydrogenated Soy
113 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Water
62 grams Sodium Hydroxide
1 Large Chicken Egg
Recipe in Ounces
8 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
4 ounces Coconut Oil
4 ounces Olive Oil
6 ounces Water
2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
1 Large Chicken Egg
Recipe in Percentages
50% Hydrogenated Soy
25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide
Q.S. Egg

 

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Remove approximately 2 ounces of oils from the melted oils. Add the egg to the removed oil and mix well. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano especially since we are adding a temperature sensitive ingredient. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until a light trace is achieved. Add the egg and oil mixture and mix well. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

Note: When you cut the egg soap it will have a stinky egg smell to it and we noticed a greenish discoloration in the center. This smell will go away after allowing the soap to cure! The color in the center of the soap will also go away.

 

Melted Oils
Lye Solution
Egg and Olive Oil
Ready for Mixing
Mixing Soap
Mixed Soap
Soap in Mold
After 5 days

Egg soap after curing for 1 day
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Rating: 4.6/5 (5 votes cast)

Chinese Star Anise Soap

There is an early morning market that happens daily in my new neighborhood. Everyone gets up and goes to the market to get fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, grains, tofu, meats and even spices. The Chinese want the freshest products they can get, so it is easy to find produce that was picked just this morning. The prices are very reasonable. I got 1500 grams (3.3 lbs) of green beans for only 5 RMB! This is less than $1 US! It is fun to go to the market to pick the produce I want to use to make dinner each evening.

When I saw the spice vendor, I was impressed by the HUGE pile of Star Anise that was for sale. Anyone could buy as much or as little quantity as wanted. They were having a special sale because they had just brought in a new crop of the Star Anise. Spend 3 RMB ($0.50) and get 50 grams or spend 10 RMB ($1.60) and get 200 grams. Seeing this pile of Star Anise inspired me to make a batch of soap for those hunters and fishers as it is in the middle of summer. Come join me in the kitchen to make Chinese Star Anise soap!

 

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Shea Butter
Olive Oil
Palm Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams 
227 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Shea Butter
113 grams Olive Oil
454 grams Palm Oil
128 grams Sodium Hydroxide
340 grams Water
7 grams Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Recipe in Ounces
8 ounces Coconut Oil
4 ounces Shea Butter
4 ounces Olive Oil
16 ounces Palm Oil
4.51 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
12 ounces Water
0.25 ounces Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Recipe in Percentages
25% Coconut Oil
12% Shea Butter
12% Olive Oil
49% Palm Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide
Q.S. Water
1% Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil

 

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil. Stir well. Pour soap into the desired mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm. The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

 

Note: We noticed that the cut soap had a beautiful white swirly color to it when we first cut it due to the stearines in the fats.

Buying Chinese Star Anise at the Market
Chinese Star Anise
Weighing Oils
Mixing Lye
Mixing Oils and Lye Solution
Mixing Soap
Mixed Soap
Adding Chinese Star Anise Essential Oil
Soap in Molds

Cut soap
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Rating: 5.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Face Scrub with Liquid Soap – Day 2

Yesterday, we made a liquid soap paste. Today we will turn that base into a nice scrub for the face. You can even use this method to create a mask! Let’s head to the kitchen!I added water to the soap paste to make it softer and smoother but I also wanted a very thick and viscous scrub. Traditionally when making liquid soap, for 16 ounces of oils, 24 or more ounces of water are added. I only added 14 ounces of water.

 

I added Ground Apricot Seeds for the exfoliant. It is very fine and at a lower usage rate, it perfect for a face or even body scrub.

Collect Needed Items

Ingredients
Liquid Soap Paste
Ground Apricot Seeds
Water
Equipment
Scale
Containers
Plastic Bag

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
All of yesterday’s Liquid Soap Paste
1.75 oz Ground Apricot Seeds
14 oz Water
Recipe in Grams
All of yesterday’s Liquid Soap Paste
50 grams Ground Apricot Seeds
397 grams Water
Recipe in Percentages
90% Liquid Soap Paste
10% Ground Apricot Seeds
Q.S. Water

Scoop the soap paste into a plastic bag. Add the Ground Apricot Seeds and two ounces of water. Close the bag and knead until the water is completely mixed in. Add the water a little bit at a time and mix it in completely. Repeat until all of the water has been incorporated. Package into containers. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Scrub
Mixed Soap
Weighing Ground Apricot Seeds
Soap and Ground Apricot Seeds
Mixing Scrub
Mixing Scrub

Scrub ready to put into jars
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)