Category Archives: Soap

Carrot Decoction

After completing the mushroom decoction I have decided to venture on and create a carrot decoction and ginger decoction. I have gathered my supplies and I’m ready to start cooking, first I will clean and cut up some carrots and place into a sauce pan, add water (I need at least 6 oz for the recipe), so adjust the water amount to your needs. Then I brought the mixture to a boil and turn heat down to let simmer for 20-30 minutes. As you can see in the photo the water came out a pale orange color. This will be the water portion that I will be using in making my next batch of soap. I am listing the soap recipe below and using 6 ounces of the carrot decoction that I just created.

Caution – Please make sure that you allow time for your hot decoctions to cool before you add lye to them.  

Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Decoction of choice
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water/Decoction
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water/Decoction
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water/Decoction

I’m going to use the same soap recipe as I did when making the soap with infusions, powders, and mushroom decoction. This will give you some ideas and suggestions when you try any of the infusions, powders, or decoctions in your soap batches.

Begin by weighing the sodium hydroxide and adding it to the carrot water. Now, weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the cooled lye solution to the cooled oil mixture. Our target temperature is about 120°F because this is a small batch (1 lb). We do not want the soap to overheat and volcano out of the mold. When the temperature is reached then mix the oils and lye solution together with an immersion blender, continue mixing until trace is achieved then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. If you want to add more or less of the decoction do a second batch so you can compare the difference and vote for your personal choice. Try a half and half mixture; or a one fourth to three fourths mixture or full amount of water could be your decoction.

I have noticed that when adding this decoction that I am getting a light pale orange color to the soap. When adding decoctions to my soap I am most interested in adding beneficial elements of the carrots into the soap and not worrying too much about a significant color change. Maybe if carrots are in my soaps it will help improve my vision? Probably not. In any event, the carrots may be added if they are mashed up after cooking. Use no more than 1 Tablespoon of carrot puree to a 1 lb fat batch when adding your cooked carrots.

Tonya

Carrots
Carrots

Blending soap to trace
Blending soap to trace

Soap with Carrot Decoction
Soap with Carrot Decoction
Carrot Decoction
Carrot Decoction

Soap w/Carrot Decoction
Soap w/Carrot Decoction

Soap with Carrot Decoction
Soap with Carrot Decoction
Mixing lye
Mixing lye

Pouring Soap into Mold
Pouring Soap into Mold
Melted Oils and Lye Mixture
Melted Oils and Lye Mixture
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Safflower Powder in Cold Process Soap

We have been making Tinctures, Infusions, and Decoctions with several dried herbs and with many of the powders that are available in the catalog. Today instead of using the extraction method to get the properties or color out of the dried herbs or powders I would like to show you how to use them directly in your cold process soaps. My main reason for doing this is to show you some wonderful color options for your soaps that the powders will provide.Today I am going to use Safflower Powder, this powder has a beautiful red orange color. Safflowers are a bright yellow orange flower, they appear dry and spiky in the fields. The dried flowers take on a red orange appearance and the herbal/floral aroma is a great addition. The powder is ground very fine and feels soft to the touch. You can add this powder directly to your soap for a great golden color.I have gathered some supplies and I’m ready show you how easy adding botanical color can be.

Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Powder of choice
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Powder
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
5 grams Powder
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Powder

I’m going to use the same soap recipe as I did when making the soap with infusions. This will give you some ideas and suggestions when you try the infusions or powders in your soap batches.

Begin by weighing all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool separately until they reach a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. When cooled, mix the oils and lye solution together and blend with immersion blender until trace is achieved. Once your mixture has made it to trace add in your powder approximately 1 teaspoon, mix thoroughly then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

I have noticed that when adding the powder that I am getting a deep golden color or tint to the soap. I only used 1 tsp and got this fabulous color. Even though the powder color is red orange, when added to the soap it gets a golden dark yellow tone.

I have added a few photos to show you the process, I hope you are making some great soaps with me and enjoying the fun. Check out the last photo of all the soap lined up Safflower Powder is the first from the left, beautiful yellow color. I will keep watching and see if the color changes while it cures.

Tonya

 

 

First Batch with no Powders or Infusions added

Mixing Lye

Mixing Oils

Mixing Safflower Powder in Soap

Infusions, Tinctures, and Powders in Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Paprika Powder in Cold Process Soap

This Paprika Powder is great, the color is absolutely amazing. So, I am continuing on with my different powders to add to soap and now I have the paprika powder, thinking potato salad….. no I’m thinking what a beautiful color this would make in my soap. Today I will show you how to include this into your cold process soap and leave the potato salad for another venue like cooking class.Here we go using the Paprika Powder, this is a mild and sweet variety of Capsicum annum. The color is oil soluble and makes a wonderful soap. If you plan to make swirl bars with paprika, then plan on each swirl bleeding the color into the uncolored parts. The oil soluble nature of this natural plant leads to the color being mobile in soap.You can infuse this plant powder into any oil and extract the oil soluble color compounds. Then use the infusion as a natural color. Soaps can be from light, peach color to intensely orange. The odor is mild and very earthy but not smokey. I have gathered some supplies and I’m ready show you how easy adding botanical can be.Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Paprika
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Powder
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
5 grams Powder
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Powder

I’m going to use the same soap recipe again, as I did when making the soap with infusions. This will give you some ideas and suggestions when you try the infusions or powders in your soap batches.

Begin by weighing all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool separately until they reach a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. When cooled, mix the oils and lye solution together and blend with immersion blender until trace is achieved. Once your mixture has made it to trace add in your powder approximately 1 teaspoon, mix thoroughly then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

I have noticed that when adding the powder that I am getting a bright orange color to the soap. I only used 1 tsp and got this fabulous color.

I have added a few photos to show you the process, I hope you are making some great soaps with me and enjoying the fun. Check out the photos that has all the soaps lined up, Paprika Powder is the fourth batch from the left, beautiful orange color. I’m very happy with this color, I like it. I will keep watching and see if the color changes while it cures.

Tonya

First Batch with no Powders or Infusions added

Mixing Lye

Mixing Oils

These are the botanicals labeled for your convenience.

Infusions, Tinctures, and Powders in Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Orange Peel Powder in Cold Process Soap

Oranges, yummmm! Can you smell it now? I love citrus scents especially anything with orange in it is fabulous. So, I am continuing on with my different powders to add to soap and I’m sitting here with the jar of Orange Peel Powder, just enjoying the scent and trying to decide what other products can I make with this stuff. Well, today I will show you how to include this into your cold process soap and I’ll keep thinking and share with you later what else I have up my sleeve.Here we go using the Orange Peel Powder, this powder has a tan and orange color with subtle color and mostly fiber to add to your soaps. Orange peel powder has a lovely aroma of oranges. The addition of orange peel powder can make a slightly exfoliating soap to a heavily exfoliating soap. Please add small amounts during test batches to determine your level of desired exfoliating ability. I have gathered some supplies and I’m ready show you how easy adding botanical can be.Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Orange Peel Powder
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Powder
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
5 grams Powder
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Powder

I’m going to use the same soap recipe as I did when making the soap with infusions. This will give you some ideas and suggestions when you try the infusions or powders in your soap batches.

Begin by weighing all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool separately until they reach a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. When cooled, mix the oils and lye solution together and blend with immersion blender until trace is achieved. Once your mixture has made it to trace add in your powder approximately 1 teaspoon, mix thoroughly then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. If you want to add more powder do a second batch so you can compare the difference and your personal choice.

I have noticed that when adding the powder that I am getting a bright golden almost brilliant yellow color to the soap. I only used 1 tsp and got this fabulous color.

I hope you are making some great soaps with me and enjoying the fun. Check out the photos that has all the soaps lined up, Orange Peel Powder is the second to the last, beautiful yellow color. I will keep watching and see if the color changes while it cures.
Tonya

 

Mixing Lye

Papriaka next to the pouring Orange Peel

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Olive Leaf Powder Soap

I am so excited to use the Olive Leaf Powder today. I have had so much fun learning about all of these different botanicals and how they react in soap. So I went to open the bag. I am not sure what I was expecting but it wasn’t what I discovered. The Olive Leaf Powder smelled green, salty, and like olive oil. It reminded me a little of a loaf of bread fresh from the oven with rosemary, oregano, salt and drizzled in olive oil. I can tell you it has me craving Italian in a big, bad, ugly way. Now the problem is what to order! In the mean time, let’s go make some soap! 

Notes: I cut this soap and then photoed it immediately afterward. You can see what the soap will look like cure and not quite cured. I have noticed the color changes during the curing process. Some soaps have it more extreme than others. Although it is hard to see in the photo, it is a soft green to brown color. Very light and natural looking.

In the finished soap, there was the light smell of salt but I could not really smell the greenness or the olive oil odors any more. The salty odor that was there was not enough to hugely influence fragrance you might choose though. I am considering fresh odors like Mona Lisa and Cotton. What scents would you use with this botanical?

 

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter, Regular
Lye
Water
Olive Leaf Powder
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
113.4 grams Olive Oil
28.35 grams Shea Butter, Regular
69.46 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Olive Leaf Powder
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter, Regular
2.45 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
1 tsp Olive Leaf Powder
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6% Shea Butter, Regular
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Olive Leaf Powder

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

 

Taylor

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
Olive Leaf Powder
Olive Leaf Powder
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Olive Leaf Powder
Adding Olive Leaf Powder
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Kelp Powder Soap

When I first opened the Kelp Powder, I was a little unsure. Sure, I was in love with the color but I wasn’t so sure about the odor. It smelled salty and even a little fishy. I wasn’t quite sure what to do. What do you think? Will the odor come through in the soap? Let’s go find out!

Notes: I am in love with the finished color of this soap. It is kind of a soft green color. It almost reminds me of french green clay. It is very natural and elegant looking. I think it would make a beautiful salt soap. There was no coloration of the water, suds or a washcloth. No staining to worry about! Yippee!

This bar of soap did have an odor. When I added the Kelp Powder at trace, it smelled potently of fish. When it was first cut, it almost smelled like dirty feet. After curing, the odor smelled more like seaweed and salt. Not strong or overwhelming. However, I would definitely choose strong scents or those that have an ozone note to them.

I am excited to play around more with this botanical. I am thinking of using fragrance oils like The Meadow, Jacob, Ocean Rain and Woodland Ice. What fragrances would you use for this botanical?

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter, Regular
Lye
Water
Kelp Powder
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
113.4 grams Olive Oil
28.35 grams Shea Butter, Regular
69.46 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Kelp Powder
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter, Regular
2.45 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
1 tsp Kelp Powder
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6% Shea Butter, Regular
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Kelp Powder

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Kelp Soap
Finished Kelp Soap
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Adding Kelp Powder
Adding Kelp Powder

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Cold Process Soap Beginners Class

During the month of April we offered several Cold Process Soap Beginner classes and had a great time learning about the terminology, equipment, and a step by step guide in making our own first batches of cold process soap.

Everyone received a beginners equipment package that included a (scale, goggles, gloves, soap buckets, soap spoon, pH test strips, thermometer, and their own Soap Making Workbook “When It’s Good to be in a Lather“). They also received 4 complete 1 lb soap kits to make their own first batches of soap. We had a few students that took the class twice and for their second class they received 10 – 1 lb soap kits. Wow, this got them off learning the techniques in making cold process soap.

We did have an instance when someone had a batch of soap that took off in temperature and reached 200 degrees. I won’t name any names. 😉 This was a great opportunity for me to see how things could go wrong and best of all how to correct this from happening again. I feel like I am ready to conquer most soaps now. I have added several photos to show you how much we learned and enjoyed this class. I am really excited to be offering this new series of classes.

So are you all ready for an Intermediate Cold Process Class? I’m getting excited for this next class. Everyone will receive several batches of soap to make but I’m trying to decide what to include in this class. Some students have suggested adding multiple colors, maybe swirls, or adding different types of objects into the soap. What would you like to do? I need a few suggestions so I can finish putting this class together.

Thanks for playing!
Tonya

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Spirulina Powder in Cold Process Soap

We have been making Tinctures and Infusions with several dried herbs and with many of the powders that are available in the catalog. Today, instead of using the extraction method to get the properties or color out of the dried herbs or powders I would like to show you how to use them directly in your cold process soaps. My main reason for doing this is to show you some wonderful color options for your soaps that the powders will provide.Today I am going to use Spirulina Powder, this powder has a beautiful green color that I hope to carry over into my soap. Spirulina is a blue-green algae that is found in nature growing in the still, alkaline waters of lakes and ponds, it grows best in warm, fresh water lakes, but can also be found in saltwater or natural springs. Spirulina is natural and has existed since life began (or so they say). Its name comes from the spiraling shape that it makes as it grows. Spirulina is what gives bodies of water their dark green color; so why not add it to soap for the same effect?I have gathered some supplies and I’m ready show you how easy adding botanical color can be.

Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Spirulina Powder
Equipment
Scale
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Infusion
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
5 grams Infusion
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Infusion

Begin by weighing all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool separately until they reach a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. When cooled, mix the oils and lye solution together and blend with immersion blender until trace is achieved. Once your mixture has made it to trace add in your powder approximately 1 teaspoon, mix thoroughly then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

That’s it! Where is the easy button?

I have noticed that when adding the powders that I am getting a deep bold color or tint to the soap. I only used 1 tsp and got this fabulous color.

I have added a few photos to show you the process, I hope you are making some great soaps with me and enjoying the fun. Check out the last photo of all the soap lined up Spirulina Powder is the third from the left, beautiful green color. I will keep watching and see if the color changes while it cures.
Tonya

Mixing Spirulina Powder in Soap
Infusions, Tinctures, and Powders in Soap
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Using Infusions in Cold Process Soap

Last I showed you how to use your infusions in the Melt & Pour Soap, it is a very easy process and a great way to incorporate all those dried herb infused properties into your soaps. Now I am going to show you how to add the infusions we made into a cold process soap. I have gathered some supplies and I’m ready show you how easy this is as well.Supplies Needed:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lye
Water
Infusion of choice
Equipment
Scale
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Bucket
Gloves
Soaping Goggles
Soap mold of choice

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170.1 Palm Kernel Oil
141.75 grams Coconut Oil
141.75 grams Olive Oil
62.37 grams Lye
177 mL Water
1 tsp Infusion
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
5 oz Olive Oil
2.20 oz Lye
6 fl oz Water
5 grams Infusion
Recipe in Percentages
38% Palm Kernel Oil
31% Coconut Oil
31% Olive Oil
Q.S. Lye
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Infusion

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to the water to form a lye solution. Allow the oils and the lye to cool separately until they reach a lower temperature. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. When cooled, mix the oils and lye solution together and blend with immersion blender until trace. Once your mixture has made it to trace then add the infusion (approximately 1 teaspoon per lb of fat), mix thoroughly then pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

That’s it! Where is the easy button?

I have noticed that when adding the infusions that I am getting a very light color or tint to the soap. Check out the photo of the two 1 lb. clamshell containers, the batch to the right is shown without the infusion and the batch to the left (the pale orange color) is a batch of soap made with the paprika powder infused in apricot kernel oil. I only used 1 tsp and got this fabulous color. I think I’m craving a Creamsicle about now; how about you?

I have added a few photos to show you the process, I hope you are making infusions with me and enjoying the fun.

Tonya

Variety of Powders to Use
Paprika batch and Plain batchBlending Infusion into SoapPouring Paprika Infused Soap into moldFinished Soap in Clamshell

 

 

 

 

 

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Making Melt & Pour Soap with Infusions and Tinctures

I’m so excited to finally use some of these tinctures and infusions that I decided to show you how to use these in Melt and Pour soap. I have collected my supplies and I’m ready to start.

Supplies for Melt and Pour Soap
• Melt and Pour Soap
• Infusions that I just created with oil and dried herb
• Tinctures that I created with alcohol and dried herb
• Method of heating the Melt and Pour soap: microwave, tea kettle, etc.
• Microwavable container or pot for melting soap
• Stirring spoon or similar tool
• Containers and labels for finished product

I decided to make my soaps in the small 2.7 oz. rectangular clam-shells; this will be perfect to take to shipping so they can send out samples with the orders.

I started with smaller chunks of the Melt and Pour soap, roughly the size of a softball (not necessarily softball shaped) and placed in a large pot on the stove set at medium heat until all melted.

I added 1% infused oil into melted soap; I measured about 570 grams of soap and 6 grams of the infused oil. This allowed me to fill approximately 8 of the clamshell containers that I chose. Whatever container you choose to use you will need to do a little calculation to determine the amount of soap to infused oil to use.

Once the melt and pour soap was melted I weighed my soap and added the infused oil, then mixed well before pouring into the containers. Wow, that was easy!

I did notice that some of my soaps had a few bubbles on the top. This is the perfect time to use the tinctures! I sprayed the tincture directly on top of the soap and Voilà! the bubbles disappeared and I was able to use the tincture in my melt and pour soap!

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