Archive for the ‘Soap’ Category

Earth Soap

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011
I really enjoy spring. The flowers coming up, the birds singing, and the bright gentle rays of golden sun in the morning. I love mornings like that. Right now, the ground is covered with snow and what I truly miss is the brown earth. While I may not be able to see the dirt, I can make my own dirt soap. I just can’t wait to get dirty. ;-) (Is it just me or is there irony in a Dirt Soap? Dirt = Dirty, Messy. Soap = Squeaky Clean) Excited for spring? Come join me as we bring a little bit of Earth into our own homes. 

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil 

Water
Lye

 

Earth Fragrance Oil
Brown Oxide, Premixed

Equipment
Immersion Blender
Soap Spoon
Soap Bucket
Scale
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soy
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Sunflower Oil 

6 oz Water
2.2 oz Lye

.3 oz Earth Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Brown Oxide, Premixed

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soy
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Sunflower Oil 

170 grams Water
62 grams Lye

8.5 grams Earth Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Brown Oxide, Premixed

Recipe in Percentages
24.4% Hydrogenated Soy
24.4% Palm Kernel Oil
16.3% Sunflower Oil 

24.4% Water
8.9% Lye

1.2% Earth Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Brown Oxide, Premixed

Heat your oils gently until liquid. Mix lye into six ounces of water. Slowly pour lye solution into oils in the soap bucket. Using an immersion blender, mix until trace in reached. Add fragrance and color. I added about a tablespoon of mixed color. Mix well. Pour soap into mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Remove from mold and cut. Stack the bars to allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy and thank for joining me in the test kitchen!

Note: The premixed color was made by adding 2 oz of Brown Oxide to 16 oz Glycerin.

Taylor

Finished Soap

Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Mixing Soap

Adding Fragrance and Color

Mixing Soap

Poured into Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Chai & Lavender Soap

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011
I am a huge fan of spices. I love Chai tea, gingersnaps, spiced pound cake, spiced apple cider, carrot cake, curries and more. I am not a big fan of many floral scents. You won’t find to many in my personal collection. However, spice things up and I am there. (Uh-oh. Pun not intended.) :-) 

I was participating in the Valentine Swap that Andee hosted, when I decided I wanted to make a Spiced Lavender Soap. Yum! With this blend, I am a convert to the Lavender Fan Club. This scent is not super strong like the potpourri pine cones sold in December. It is light and polite. It may even make some converts to the Spice Fan Club! I enjoyed this soap so much I just had to share with everyone. Join me in the kitchen to make a soap with an exciting scent blend.

Collect needed items:

Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil 

Water
Lye

Lavender 40/42
Chai Latte Blend
Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Equipment
Immersion Blender
Soap Spoon
Soap Bucket
Scale
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soy
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Sunflower Oil 

6 oz Water
2.2 oz Lye

.15 oz Lavender 40/42
.15 oz Chai Latte Blend
Q.S. Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soy
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Sunflower Oil 

170 grams Water
2.2 oz Lye

4.25 grams Lavender 40/42
4.25 grams Chai Latte Blend
Q.S. Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Recipe in Percentages
24.4% Hydrogenated Soy
24.4% Palm Kernel Oil
16.3% Sunflower Oil 

24.4% Water
8.9% Lye

.6% Lavender 40/42
.6% Chai Latte Blend
Q.S. Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Heat your oils gently until liquid. Mix lye into six ounces of water. Slowly pour lye solution into oils in the soap bucket. Using an immersion blender, mix until trace in reached. Add fragrance and color. Mix well. Pour soap into mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Remove from mold and cut. Stack the bars to allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy and thank for joining me in the test kitchen!

Taylor

Finished Soap


Mixing Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Mixing Soap

Adding Essential Oil Blend at Trace

Mixing Color into Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Blueberry Superfruit Soap

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011
Yesterday I shared my adventure of making the Acai Superfruit Soap. In a way this soap is a continuation of that adventure, because when I pulled the tea out of the cupboard I also grabbed the Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea from Bigelow Tea. I decided that since I was going to make an Acai themed soap, I would also make a Blueberry themed soap. As you can probably guess, I’m going to use Blueberry Butter and Red Grape & Blueberry Fragrance Oil.

Blueberries don’t grow well in our alkaline soils, but I do enjoy the rare treat of fresh blueberries. This soap allows that enjoyment of these scrumptious berries to be a year round treat for the skin!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Blueberry Butter
Sweet Almond Oil
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea from Bigelow Tea
Red Grape & Blueberry Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I used Dirk’s Guerrilla Soap Mold)
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea: 20 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 3 minutes
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
4 ounces Blueberry Butter
4 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
8 ounces Coconut Oil
8 ounces Palm Oil
8 ounces Sunflower Oil

2 Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea from Bigelow Tea
12 fl oz water
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide

0.56 ounces Red Grape & Blueberry Fragrance Oil

Just like the Acai Superfruit soap that I showed you yesterday, I prepared the tea the day before I made the soap. I used 13 ounces of water and 2 tea bags. I allowed the tea to steep for about 45 minutes and then I refrigerated the tea until the next day when I would have enough time to make soap. The next day I removed the tea from the refrigerator and allowed it to come to room temperature before doing anything else.

Measure the fixed oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the fixed oils in the microwave. It took about 2 minutes in my microwave to melt all of the oils.

As the oils are melting in the microwave, add sodium hydroxide to the tea. Mix well. Since I had already made the Acai Superfruit soap, I had an idea that the tea would change color when the sodium hydroxide was added. I was right, but this time the color change didn’t worry me! ;) At first, the lye solution was a olive green color and after the solution was completely mixed it settled on being a brownish-orange color.

Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. For me, this took almost 2 minutes to reach the thin trace. After the soap reached this point I added the fragrance and mixed well. Once the fragrance was completely mixed into the raw soap, I poured the soap into the Guerrilla Soap Mold. I allowed the soap to sit until was firm.

The next morning the soap was cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap was firm when I removed it from the mold after 24 hours. I sliced the soap into bars and was very surprised to find that the brownish-purple raw soap had a pinkish-brown color. I love this odd coloration and I’ll have to say that it is a great color.

This soap smells just like a mixed berry syrup without being extremely sweet, I bet this fragrance would be a favorite of kids especially when named, “Berry Blast” or “Berry Twisted Ice Cream.” Gee, just coming up with these names makes me want to act like a kid again. (Just for the fun dessert names!)

Tomorrow Taylor will take a turn at this microphone and share the beginning of her latest experiment that will cover two days. I think you will definitely find this interesting!

Enjoy!

Finished soap.

Completely measured fixed oils.

Brewed Blueberry tea.

Adding the sodium hydroxide to the tea.

Stirring the lye solution.

Completely mixed lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the melted oils.

Mixing the raw soap.

The blueberry (front) and acai (back) soaps in the mold.

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Acai Superfruit Soap

Monday, January 31st, 2011
With all the cold winter weather lately, you can be sure to find a warm cup of tea on my desk. As I was drinking a cup of Acai Green Tea from The Republic of Tea, I wondered what would happen if I used this tea in soap. Naturally I had to test this out. I decided to also use the Acai Butter for this soap because I thought it would be really cool to have both the Acai Green Tea and the Acai Butter in a soap. I decided that this soap needed just a little more of acai, so I decided to use the Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil to scent the soap.

What can I say? Acai is inspiring!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Acai Butter
Sweet Almond Oil
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Acai Green Tea bags from The Republic of Tea
Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I used Dirk’s Guerrilla Soap Mold)
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to Acai Green Tea: 20 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 3 minutes
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
4 ounces Acai Butter
4 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
8 ounces Coconut Oil
8 ounces Palm Oil
8 ounces Sunflower Oil

2 Acai Green Tea bags from The Republic of Tea
12 fl oz water
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide

0.56 ounces Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil

This soap took two days to make since I started making my tea as I would normally make it for drinking. I measured 13 oz of water and heated it until almost was boiling. This took about 2 minutes in my microwave. I removed the water from the microwave and added two tea bags to it. Most of the time you will want 1 bag or 1 teaspoon of tea for 6 ounces of water. You can always add a more tea for a stronger infusion if you would like.

As I was not going to drink this tea, I allowed the tea to steep for about 45 minutes. I wanted to be able to have a strong tea that was at room temperature. Due to my not so great timing the tea had cooled by the time the day had ended. I removed the teabags and then placed the tea in the refrigerator so I could come back the next day to make this soap.

First thing the next morning I removed the tea from the refrigerator and allowed it to come back to room temperature. I left the tea for about 90 minutes while it came back to room temperature. After the 90 minutes, I checked the temperature of the tea and it was warm enough that I could begin making soap.

Measure the fixed oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the fixed oils in the microwave. It took about 2 minutes in my microwave to melt all of the oils.

While the oils are melting in the microwave, add sodium hydroxide to the tea. Mix well. This will drastically change color, so don’t be alarmed. When I first added the sodium hydroxide to the tea, there was a color change to brown where the sodium hydroxide settled to the bottom. Then as I began mixing, the solution turned a rotten green and then brownish-orange! At this point, I started feeling as if this soap might actually be a bad idea. I decided since I had already mixed my lye solution and my oils were melted, that the only thing I could do was to continue making my soap.

Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. For me, this took almost 2 minutes to reach the thin trace. I had to wonder about that because I felt like I was making a Castile soap just for the long time that this soap took to reach thin trace. At this point I added the fragrance and mixed well. Once the fragrance was completely mixed into the raw soap, I poured the soap into the Guerrilla Soap Mold. I allowed the soap to sit until was firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap was firm when I removed it from the mold after 24 hours. I sliced the soap into bars and was very surprised to find that the brown soap had light swirls in it. I was perplexed, so I wandered over to Technical Support to ask why.

It turns out that this will happen when the stearine parts of the oils (most likely from the Palm Oil) were not completely melted and mixed. The soap is poured into the mold with these parts making a swirl. While the soap loaf goes through gel phase and completes the saponification, these separate oil components turn to soap and leave a decorative swirl pattern to the soap. These swirls are easily seen when the rest of the soap is a darker color.

I’m glad to know that my soap is just fine. I asked if this was easily duplicated and to my surprise, I was told yes. When making a batch of soap, have lower temperatures that are around 110° F and add partially melted Palm Oil or sprinkle Beeswax into the soap, lightly mix and promptly pour into the mold. I think I’ll have to try this purposely to see if I can make a tutorial for that!

This soap smells awesome, so I would highly recommend giving trying the Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil for your next batch of soap. Definitely a sweet and fruity way to enjoy a shower!

Tomorrow I’ll share the Blueberry Soap that I made right after this one. I think you will enjoy it!

Enjoy!

Completed soap.

Fixed oils are ready to be melted.

Completely brewed Acai Green Tea.

The Acai Green Tea after adding sodium hydroxide.

Stirring the lye solution.

Wow! What a color change!

The lye solution as it cools.

Adding the lye solution to the oils.

Mixing the raw soap.

Adding fragrance to the soap.

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Valentine’s for Him – Soap

Friday, January 28th, 2011
We are almost done with our Valentine’s for Him themed week. Don’t let Valentine’s get away from you this year! It is just around the corner!

Most men are one product type of guys. They like things quick and easy. In some ways, they present a challenge for us. They also inspire quick, multi-purpose and single use products. I wanted a firm bar that lathered well. I also wanted to add something that would keep his hair and skin healthy and soft.

I used Coconut Oil, Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Oil as the backbone for this recipe. These oil create nice firm bars with excellent and rich lather. I also added Shea Butter to my recipe. It softens, moisturizes and smooths to create luscious hair. This soap just might make you look for more excuses to run your fingers through his hair.

I used Almond Milk in this soap. I made fresh Almond Milk using the SoyaPower Plus Soy Milk Maker.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
21 oz wt Coconut Oil
25 oz wt Palm Oil
32.75 oz wt Palm Kernel Oil
5.25 oz wt Shea Butter, Refined

16 fl oz Water
16 fl oz Almond Milk
12.25 oz wt lye (sodium hydroxide)

1 fl oz Citrus & Basil Fragrance Oil

Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Soap Bucket
Jars
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Goggles
Spoon
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in Percentages
16.24% Coconut Oil
19.34% Palm Oil
25.33% Palm Kernel Oil
4.06% Shea Butter, Refined12.37% Water
12.37% Almond Milk
9.47% Lye (sodium hydroxide)

.77% Citrus & Basil Fragrance Oil

Measure oils on your scale. Heat your oils until they are liquid. In a separate container, add the sodium hydroxide to the water. Stir well. Combine the oils and lye solution. Blend until you reach a light trace. Add the Almond Milk and the Citrus & Basil Fragrance Oil. Blend well. Pour the soap into molds. Allow the soap to sit until firm. Cut into bars and allow to cure. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Weighing Oils

Adding Lye to Water

Stirring Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Mixing Soap

Adding Milk and Fragrance Oil

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Coconut & Wheat Germ Oil Soap Test

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011
I’ve been trying to clean and organize my office and blog kitchen and while I’ve made some progress, I’ve discovered lots of projects that need to be made. I found two partial bottles of Wheat Germ Oil that needed to be used soon and I decided that the best way to use this oil was to make soap.

I decided to make a 1 pound test batch that had only Wheat Germ Oil and Coconut Oil.
Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Wheat Germ Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
5 oz Coconut Oil
11 oz Wheat Germ Oil

2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

Measure the fixed oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the fixed oils in the microwave. It only took about 45 seconds in my microwave to melt the Coconut Oil.

Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap was firm when I removed it from the mold after 24 hours.

72 Hour Evaluation:
I washed my hands with the soap 72 hours after making this batch and these are my observations.

1) There was a moderate amount of big bubbles with an underlying dense lather.
2) The soap had a silky feel to it as I was washing my hands.
3) The soap had a soapy scent to it that intensified when the soap was wet.
4) After drying my hands it felt like my hands were smooth and didn’t need a moisturizer at all.

Anyway, these are my evaluations. I hope this has helped you!

Finished soap.

Measured lye and water.

Beginning to mix the lye solution.

Stirring the lye solution.

Melted fixed oils and lye solution.

(more…)

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Chai Latte Soap

Thursday, January 13th, 2011
I just had to make a Chai Latte Soap. Chai Latte, soap making, and spa moments are my favorite things that are being rolled into one! I used Almond Milk in this soap. I made fresh Almond Milk using the SoyaPower Plus Soy Milk Maker.

This soap turned out to be a gorgeous one. It smells really really good. So good in fact, I hate to send it down to shipping. However, I will part with it because it is an absolute must try! Tell me what you think. If you would like a sample, request one in your next order!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil
Water
Almond Milk
Sodium Hydroxide
Chai Latte Blend
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Soap Bucket
Jars
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Goggles
Spoon
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Soap Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4 ounces Sunflower Oil

3 ounces Water
3 ounces Almond Milk
2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide

.32 ounces Chai Latte Blend

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Upon light trace add the Chai Latte Blend and the Almond Milk. Stir well. Pour soap into the desired mold, I used a Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut the soap into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

Taylor

Cut Soap

Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Fragrance and Almond Milk

Pouring Soap into Molds

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Soaps of the Past

Monday, December 27th, 2010

The old soaps collection.

I’m sure every reader here has their own reasons for why they make soaps, lotions and other products. Allergies, sensitive skin, the desire for knowledge, a hobby, becoming a self-sustaining person, and many more reasons. While I haven’t even touched the surface of all the reasons, there is one reason that makes me think about history. I make soap because I want to be able to use a product I made just like _________(my grandma, the pioneers, the Medieval Europeans, the colonists) did.

This reason usually has me thinking about how soap making changed from a small batch production process to a large batch production process during the Industrial Revolution. Andrew Pears is credited with the invention of a high quality, transparent soap in 1789. It was not until 1865 when Pears son-in-law, Thomas J. Barratt, entered the firm in a partnership. He created an advertising campaign that was unique in its use of images and memorable slogans. Barratt is now known as the father of modern advertising. While the Pears brand is still trademarked and sold today, I find this beginning of commercial soap intriguing.

I’ve been collecting different old soaps over the past months and I’m starting to have an impressive collection. I have various soaps from the 1960s to WWII issued soaps and I even have a soap that has a 1898 United States Internal Revenue Tax Paid stamp on the package! That soap is the Cuticura Soap on the top row and center. The history behind each bar of soap is amazing. I’ll have to admit that it is very exciting to hold piece of ordinary day-to-day history in my hands!

Here is a list of the soaps and toiletries as they appear in the picture.
Top Row (Left to Right): Merrill’s Fine Toilet Soap, Conti Olive Oil Castile Soap, Williams Menthol Mug Shaving Soap, Cuticura Soap Medicinal & Toilet, Lifebuoy Health Soap, Amolin Cream Deodorant.
Second Row Down (Left to Right): Kirk’s Original Coco Hardwater Castile, Palmer Rose Leaves Soap, Octagon Soap, Ting Anti-Bacterial Soap.
Third Row Down (Left to Right): Ivory Soap, Cashmere Bouquet Toilet Soap by Colgate, Camay Soap, OQMG No 100-A-Type 1 Soap (WWII US Army issued)
Bottom Row (Left to Right): Grandpa’s Wonder Pine Tar Toilet Soap, Moon Rose Complexion Soap, Patch’s Gadoment (used for burn and wound treatments), Palmolive soap with a token for a free cake of soap when you buy one cake.
The large soap box on the side is Deseret Brand Granulated Soap that was produced and distributed by the L.D.S. Welfare Plan.

If you come visit our facility, ask about the old soaps and we will be more than willing to show you the soaps.

Enjoy this little taste of history!

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Introduction to Liquid Soap Week, Day Three

Thursday, December 9th, 2010
Yesterday, I showed you a liquid soap that overflowed and was a very troublesome batch overall. Today, I’ll show you a batch of soap that I formulated with the idea of having a soap that had a good lather.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Sweet Almond Oil
Castor Oil
Coconut Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Wheat Germ Oil
Potassium Hydroxide
Water (I used Reverse Osmosis.)
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoons
Gloves
Crock pot or Double Boiler system
Safety goggles, anti fog are helpful
Heavy duty gloves
Immersion blender
Thermometer
Work clothes with long sleeves and closed shoes
Vinegar
Microwave for heating oils (If you are using the crock pot)
Containers for the finished soap
Recipe in ounces:
4.5 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
7 ounces Castor Oil
8 ounces Coconut Oil
8 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4.5 ounces Wheat Germ Oil

6.8 ounces Potassium Hydroxide
12 fluid ounces Water

This batch of soap was made just like the soap on Monday and I didn’t have any incidents, so I was very excited to have a normally behaving batch of soap. The oils were 160° F when the Potassium Hydroxide solution was added. The soap proceeded to mix well through the cottage cheese and then the sticky taffy stages. When the soap started to puff, I was a little nervous since I didn’t want a soap overflow again. The soap did not overflow and eventually settled to the dense paste again. I covered the crock pot with the lid and let the soap cook for 3 hours and stirred every 20 minutes.

When the soap reached this translucent stage, I boiled 2 ounces of water and added 1 oz of soap to the water. After stirring until the soap was completely dissolved, I allowed the soap sample to cool. This soap sample was completely clear. This meant the soap could be diluted with 64 ounces of water. I allowed the soap to cook for about an hour. This allowed the dilution to occur slowly without adding lots of bubbles.

I wasn’t completely sure how to answer some of the questions that have been asked, so I have written these Interview Questions and my responses. The questions are posed as from the Blog Editor. Enjoy!

Blog Editor: What did you like about this soap?
Andee: I enjoyed making this soap. It was easy and a boost in my confidence after my overflowing batch earlier this week.

BE: Why did you chose the oils that you did?
A: I chose the oils for various reasons that were noted in Catherine Failor’s book. I chose the Coconut and Palm Kernel Oils because these oils have an excellent cleaning properties that produced a quick lather with big bubbles. The Sweet Almond Oil was picked for the persistent lather and the mild cleansing action. The Castor Oil was selected for the long lasting lather that it could contribute. I also wanted to use the Wheat Germ Oil because it naturally contains Vitamin E and is great to use on the skin.

BE: Would you consider a stainless steel potato masher to keep the puffing down?
A: I don’t think so. The puffing reminds me of a jam or jelly that is coming to a full rolling boil. It needs to be vigorously stirred down.

BE: When it got to the edges did you have a scoop to make sure it didn’t overflow?
A: No. I just used the whisk attachment and stirred well to keep the puffing soap down.

BE: What are your questions to yourself about liquid soap making?
A: I have lots of questions and each one brings more questions after it.

  1. Why does Catherine Failor use a excess of KOH when a 2% superfat doesn’t require the neutralization that her recipes need? I would be intrigued to learn how she learned to make liquid soap and what the primary resources for information were during the writing of the book.
  2. How would this work on the glass cooktop? Would the cycling heat affect how the soap cooks?
  3. Is there a better option to make a liquid soap rather than small batches?
  4. Is there a way to mass produce liquid soap as a small home soapmaker? Even this batch that I made would only fill ten 16 fl oz bottles. When you are selling product, I would think you would want the ability to make more product that 10 bottles at a time. I figure you are looking at 4 to 5 hours from start to finish, so wouldn’t it be best to make the best of your time?

BE: If you had to show this to someone else what would you want them to see or question or challenge?
A: I want people to see that liquid soap is easy to make, if you are well prepared. I think people see a complicated process and they don’t see that other products they already make have a similar process, maybe not as time intensive, but just as complicated looking in the beginning. I would hope that people would challenge the recipes I formulated and try to make a recipe that works best for them.

The Day 3 Liquid Soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I’m excited to say I have approximately 80 samples of this liquid soap! I would love to hear your comments about this liquid soap. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one with their order and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Melted oils in the crock pot.

Mixing the oils and Potassium Hydroxide solution.

The cottage cheese stage has started.

The cottage cheese stage has progressed.

Puffing soap as it cooks.

Stirring the puffing soap.

Stirring the soap paste.

(more…)

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Introduction to Liquid Soap Week, Day Two

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010
On Monday, I made a liquid soap the right way and since I really messed up on this batch, I’ll show you what I did and how you can prevent it. This soap was the Olive & Coconut Oil Soap that I promised I would make and it turned out fine, there were just some problems during the processing!

If you want instructions for a good batch of liquid soap, I would recommend reading Monday’s blog post.

Uh-oh! The soap is overflowing!

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