Category Archives: Soap

Olive Oil Liquid Soap

Recently, I was asked to show how to make a batch of liquid soap that was a 100% Olive Oil batch. This batch of soap was easy to make, but definitely a learning experience during the dilution phase!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Potassium Hydroxide
Water (I used Reverse Osmosis.)
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoons
Gloves
Crock pot or Double Boiler system
Safety goggles, anti fog are helpful
Heavy duty gloves
Immersion blender
Thermometer
Work clothes with long sleeves and closed shoes
Vinegar
Microwave for heating oils (If you are using the crock pot)
Containers for the finished soap
Recipe in ounces:
32 ounces Olive Oil 

6 ounces Potassium Hydroxide
12 fluid ounces Water

To begin making my liquid soap, I weighed and poured my Olive Oil into the crock pot. I turned the crock pot on and waited for the oil to heat. My desired temperature is around 160° F. This temperature does not need to be precise. This took about 10 minutes to heat the oil to 157° F. As this is close enough, I weighed the Potassium Hydroxide and then added it to my water. I’ve made three other batches of liquid soap, so this time the boiling sound did not bother me. Once the Potassium Hydroxide solution was completely mixed, I added it to the oil in the crock pot. Don’t forget to pour in a slow and steady stream to help prevent splashing oil or clumping of the ingredients.

I used the immersion blender and began mixing to combine the Potassium Hydroxide solution and oils. It will take a longer time to mix together because Olive Oil takes a long time to saponify. It actually took about 20 minutes before the soap reached to cottage cheese stage! I would switch my motor for the immersion blender out with another motor to prevent myself from frying the motor. I probably switched between the two motors every 5 minutes.

After the soap finally reached the cottage cheese stage, it still took another 30 minutes just to finally reach that thick & sticky stage that is called the “sticky, saltwater taffy” stage. I could no longer use the immersion blender as the soap was so thick. I grabbed the whisk attachment for the blender, switched out the blending blade for the whisk and continued to mix the soap.

This batch of soap was behaving much more slowly than the other batches that I have made so far. Another indicator was that the soap never puffed, which I was ok with. I don’t like worrying if my soap is going to overflow! I continued cooking the soap and stirring every 20 minutes. I remained in the blog kitchen working on other projects so I could keep an eye out for any problems with the soap.

After 3 hours of stirring the soap every 20 minutes, the soap still had an off-white appearance with some translucent spots. Since it was the end of the work day, I took the crock pot home with me. I continued to cook the soap for another hour I stirred the soap every 20 minutes. After that additional hour of cooking, I the soap was completely translucent. When the soap reached this translucent stage, I boiled 2 ounces of water and added 1 oz of soap to the water. After stirring until the soap was completely dissolved, I allowed the soap sample to cool. Yippee! The sample was completely clear.

I turned off the crock pot and allowed to soap to cool completely in the pot. The next morning, I took the soap back to work and dumped it into a large pot for dilution. I added 64 ounces of tap water to the pot and cooked the soap for 1 hour on low heat to allow the soap to dilute slowly. After 1 hour of cooking, there were still clumps of soap, so I added another 32 ounces of tap water. I cooked the soap for another hour and finally the soap was completely diluted. I poured the soap into a 2 gallon pail to cool and covered it. Then I cleaned all of the remaining tools and pots.

I left the pail sitting on the counter overnight and when I came back the next morning, I was VERY surprised to find my soap had become a thick gel that was like in rubber cement in consistency. Ack! What did I do wrong? I asked our Technical Support team and they asked me what water I had used for dilution. Ahh, there was my problem. I used tap water and since we have a water softener, there was a higher salt content to the water. This caused the soap to thicken so much. I asked if it was possible to fix my soap or if I had really messed up. Luckily, I was told that I could dilute the soap gel with either distilled water or reverse osmosis water and have a fluid soap again.

I pulled out my clean pot and scraped the soap gel into the pot and added 32 ounces of reverse osmosis water to dilute the soap. I cooked the soap for 1 hour on low heat to allow the soap to dilute slowly. After 1 hour of cooking, there were still clumps of soap, so I added another 32 ounces of reverse osmosis water. I cooked the soap for another hour and finally the soap was completely diluted. I poured the diluted soap in a clean 2 gallon bucket and covered the bucket. The next day, I checked on the soap and was so excited to find that it was still liquid.

The Olive Oil Liquid Soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I’m excited to say I have approximately 80 samples of this liquid soap! I would love to hear your comments about this liquid soap. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one with their order and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

I hope you have found this post to be entertaining as well as educational. Stay tuned for some great upcoming posts including a special bar soap for a special person, lotions that are perfect for the spring weather and even some food recipes!

Heating the Olive Oil in the crockpot.

Adding Potassium Hydroxide to the water.
Mixing the Potassium Hydroxide and water.
Mixing the oil and potassium hydroxide solution.
Stirring the mixture.
The soap is beginning to clump.

The clumps are starting to get bigger.

Continue reading

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Pina Smoothie Soap

I love to make things. I am always doing, creating or dreaming up something new. The problem lies in time. I don’t have enough! I love to make things that are quick, easy and painless. The only painful thing I found about this soap is how delicious it smells when you are mixing it together. Who is ready for a Pina Smoothie? I know I am. Come join me in the blog kitchen for a delectable soap. 

Pina Coladas are made from pineapple juice, coconut milk, rum and ice. I wanted a soap that would appear as if it had coconut milk and pineapple. What easier way to do this than by adding calendula petals to white soap? My hope in making this soap was that the melt and pour soap would continue to appear white while the calendula petals would make the soap appear as if there is pineapple in it. The first batch I made, I stirred to soap gently and immediately poured, the soap appears more white. When making a second soap I was distracted and I didn’t pour the soap immediately. (I have work induced A.D.D. I don’t think I ever get to do a project from start to finish without interupption. Some days, I even feel like a headless chicken with all of the running around that I do.) After about ten minutes I came back to the soap to pour it, to my surprise, the melt and pour soap was more yellow than white! I did expect the soap to color over time but the ten minute yellow was not what I expected to see. What do you think? Which do you like best, the white or yellow soap?

 

Collect Needed Materials:

Ingredients
Melt & Pour Soap, White
Pina Smoothie Fragrance Oil
Calendula Petals
Equipment
Scale
Spoon
Microwave Safe Container
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
32 ounces Melt & Pour Soap, White
.6 ounces Pina Smoothie Fragrance Oil
.2 ounces Calendula Petals
Recipe in Grams
907 grams Melt & Pour Soap, White
17 grams Pina Smoothie Fragrance Oil
5.5 grams Calendula Petals
Recipe in Percentages
97% Melt & Pour Soap, White
1.8% Pina Smoothie Fragrance Oil
.2% Calendula Petals

Weigh Melt & Pour Soap into a microwave safe. Heat gently until liquid. Stir in the Pina Smoothie Fragrance Oil and Calendula Petals. Pour soap into molds and allow to cool. Remove soap from mold and cut into bars. Enjoy!
Taylor

Finished Soap. Don't they look yummy? Can you see the color difference between the two soaps? Which do you prefer?
Weighing Melt & Pour Soap
Melted Soap
Adding Fragrance
Adding Calendula Petals
Stirring Soap
Pouring Soap into Molds

Soap Cooling
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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Lemon Poppy Seed Soap

Okay, I will admit it. I LOVE spring. I spend all of my time making spring themed products and I bake up a storm. I was browsing through one of my favorite baking books when I ran across an interesting recipe. Lemon Poppy Seed Cookies. Well, that just caused the gears in my brain to whir. I decided to make Lemon Poppy Seed Cookie soaps. Just looking at these soaps made me hungry!

These were so much fun to make. When I finally got my soap unmolded, I danced around the kitchen shrieking with delight. They smelled great, looked fabulous and it was just what I had imagined! (Don’t you like it when things work out that way?) Come join me in the kitchen so we can giggle and laugh. You never know who might come in and say “Are you making soap? That’s cool. Can I have one of those cookies? I am hungry.” Let’s go to the kitchen to make these fresh smelling soaps. What a great spring soap!

Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Shea Butter, Unrefined
Almond ButterWater
Lye
Lemon Argentina Essential Oil
Poppy Seeds
Yellow Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble
Equipment
Soap Bucket
Soap Spoon
Scale
Immersion Blender
Mold (I will be using a 3 inch diameter PVC pipe with an end cap)

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
20 oz Coconut Oil
25 oz Palm Oil
25 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Shea Butter, Unrefined
5 oz Almond Butter30 oz Water
11.21 oz Lye
1.6 oz Lemon Argentina Essential Oil
2 oz Poppy Seeds
Q.S. Yellow Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble
Recipe in Grams
567 grams Coconut Oil
708 grams Palm Oil
708 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
141 grams Shea Butter, Unrefined
141 grams Almond Butter850 grams Water
317 grams Lye
45 grams Lemon Argentina Essential Oil
56 grams Poppy Seeds
Q.S. Yellow Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble
Recipe in Percentages
16% Coconut Oil
20% Palm Oil
20% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4% Shea Butter, Unrefined
4% Almond Butter24% Water
8.9% oz Lye
1.3% Lemon Argentina Essential Oil
1.6% Poppy Seeds
Q.S. Yellow Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble

Heat oils gently until liquid. Prepare lye solution by mixing the lye and water together carefully. Do this in a well vented area. Prepare the mold by coating the inside with Vaseline or Mineral Oil. Pour the lye solution into the soap bucket with the warm oils. Mix using an immersion blender until trace is reached. Add the Lemon Essential Oil, Poppy Seeds and Yellow Lip Balm Color. Mix well. Carefully pour the soap into mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Remove soap from mold and cut. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

I had a great time making this soap. After I added the essential oil, the soap looked and smelled so good I wanted to lick the spoon! It is a good thing I am making cookies on Friday. When adding the poppy seeds and essential oil, I added a drop of the Yellow Lip Balm Color. This was because I didn’t want a white or even possibly gray soap. I didn’t want the soap to be lemon yellow either. I wanted them to be the light yellow color of the cookies we will be making on Friday.

I did have a bit of a whoops. My temperatures were too hot when I made the soap. It volcanoed out of the mold and onto the floor! Andee was very distressed at the disaster I created in the kitchen. Sorry, Andee! Well, now the floor is squeaky clean. Next time I make a large batch of soap, I will let the temperature come down more. Even so, my soap turned out fine. I have about 75 samples that I sent to Shipping. I don’t expect them to last past the 21st. Request yours today!

Taylor

Weighing Oils
Coating Inside of Mold
Weighing Lye
Weighing Essential Oil
Weighing Poppy Seeds
Mixing Lye Solution
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Adding Essentail Oil, Poppy Seeds and Yellow Lip Balm Color
Mixed Soap
Soap in Mold
Whoops! Volcano! Too Hot!!
Finished Soap
Using Plunger to Push Out Soap

Soap Ready to Cut
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Neem Oil and Titanium Dioxide in Cold Process Soap

Recently we were asked if Titanium Dioxide would color a soap white if one used dark colored oils. Since I don’t have many dark oils, I decided to make 5 different batches of soap with Neem Oil to show how using Titanium Dioxide can lighten the color, but not make a white soap. This post is a collection of all these soaps and the differences that appear in the finished soap. 

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Golden Jojoba Oil
Neem Oil
Soybean Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Titanium Dioxide
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubber Scraper
Mold of your choice (I used a Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915)
Immersion Blender
Plastic Wrap to line the mold
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 20 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 40 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces: (Batch 1)
5 ounces Coconut Oil
4 ounces Golden Jojoba Oil
1 ounce Neem Oil
6 ounces Soybean Oil
2.03 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water 

0.16 Titanium Dioxide (1% Usage Rate)

Recipe in ounces: (Batch 2)
5 ounces Coconut Oil
3 ounces Golden Jojoba Oil
2 ounces Neem Oil
6 ounces Soybean Oil
2.1 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water 

0.16 Titanium Dioxide (1% Usage Rate)

Recipe in ounces: (Batch 3)
5 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Golden Jojoba Oil
3 ounce Neem Oil
6 ounces Soybean Oil
2.18 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water 

0.16 Titanium Dioxide (1% Usage Rate)

Recipe in ounces: (Batch 4)
5 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Golden Jojoba Oil
3 ounce Neem Oil
6 ounces Soybean Oil
2.18 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water
Recipe in ounces: (Batch 5)
5 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Golden Jojoba Oil
3 ounce Neem Oil
6 ounces Soybean Oil
2.18 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water
1 ounce Titanium Dioxide (6.25% Usage Rate)

I started by mixing the Titanium Dioxide into 1 ounce of the water and allowing it to completely hydrate. I did not want any specks of white color since that would mean I did not have an accurate test. I allowed the hydrating Titanium Dioxide sit for 30 minutes before I started weighing any other materials.

After the Titanium Dioxide mixtures had been sitting for 30 minutes, I began to measure the fixed oils on the scale. You can choose to warm your oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the fixed oils in the microwave. It took about 2 minutes in my microwave to melt all of the oils.

As the oils were melting in the microwave, I added sodium hydroxide remaining water. Mix well. Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. For me, this took just 60 seconds for batches 1 & 2, but batches 3, 4 & 5 took only 40 seconds to reach trace. After the soap reached trace, I added the Titanium Dioxide mixture and mixed well. I added the color and stirred to mix the raw soap and color. At this time, the soap accelerated like nothing else I’ve ever seen. I ended up actually plopping the soap into the molds rather than pouring. I allowed the soap to sit until was firm.

The next morning the soap was cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
Batches 4 & 5 started to volcano in the mold, so I promptly dumped them back into a mixing bucket and stirred until they had cooled down enough to go back into the molds.

The comparison photo shows the following soaps from left to right: Batch 1, Batch 2, Batch 3, Batch 4, and Batch 5. As you can see, batch 5 is the lightest colored soap but it is still not pure white.

As the comparison photo shows, the addition of Titanium Dioxide will help lighten the soaps, but you will not get a pure white soap when using dark colored oils like Neem Oil. If you would like to have a white soap, I would recommend using oils that contribute a light or white color to soap in combination with Titanium Dioxide. These would be oils that are light colored in their original form. Colorless Jojoba, Lard, Soybean Oil, Coconut Oil, and Almond Oil are some oils that I would recommend for such a soap.

Enjoy!

Comparison between the five batches of soap.
Pre-mixed Titanium Dioxide with water.
Batch 1
Batch 2.
Batch 3.
Melted oils, lye solution and liquid Titanium Dioxide.

Lye solution and oils before mixing.
Mixing the raw soap.

Blending the Titanium Dioxide into the raw soap.
Adding the Titanium Dioxide mixture.

Pouring batch 1 into the mold.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

New Mold!

I am thrilled to announce that I have a new mold! Yea! This is a fairly simple mold that one of the guys in the warehouse put together for me. What did he do? Well, he went to the hardware store and got a 2′ section of pre-cut PVC pipe in 3″ diameter. He also got an end cap. He also got one that it that is 2′ long and 2″ in diameter to use as a plunger. How cool is that? 

I coated the end of the tube and inside of the cap with Vaseline. I did this because I want to be able to remove the cap and get my soap out. Work the end cap on and off a few times so it won’t stick. Also, don’t store the mold with the end cap on. It makes it harder to get off. So far so good. Remember to use a non-saponifiable oil to coat the inside of the mold. You don’t want your mold to have a one time use!

Monday, I am going to test my mold for the first time. Don’t miss out! This is going to be an experience… and an experiment. ;-) See you there!

Taylor

My New Mold!
Coating the Tube with Vaseline
Coating Cap with Vaseline

Putting Cap on Tube
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Rating: 5.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Virgin Coconut Soap

I received a question in my email that I just had to answer. I was asked if the virgin coconut oil was used in soap, would the scent remain. I honestly had no idea. I hoped so. I love the smell of the virgin coconut oil. It is dreamy. It brings to mind the warm sun and sandy beaches and rolling waves. Mmm. How peaceful. Let’s head to the test kitchen to find if the fabulous scent sticks. Here we go! 

Collect Needed Materials:

Ingredients
Virgin Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Sunflower Oil 

Water
Lye

Equipment
Immersion Blender
Soap Spoon
Soap Bucket
Scale
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Virgin Coconut Oil
6 oz Palm Oil
4 oz Sunflower Oil 

6 oz Water
2.35 oz Lye

Recipe in Grams
170 g Virgin Coconut Oil
170 g Palm Oil
113.4 g Sunflower Oil170 g Water
66.62 g Lye
Recipe in Percentages
24.6% Virgin Coconut Oil
24.6% Palm Oil
16.4% Sunflower Oil24.6% Water
9.8% Lye

Pour the lye into the water. Stir well. Avoid the fumes coming off from the container. Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using an immersion blender, mix well. Once trace has been reached, pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap and allow the bars to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar.

Notes: After I cut the bars, I smelled them to see if I could detect any of the coconut notes from the virgin coconut oil. Alas, there is no scent. It seems the the Virgin Coconut Oil is best put to use in lip balms, body butters and lotions.

Taylor

Finished Soaps
Weighing Palm Oil
Weighing Virgin Coconut Oil
Weighing Water for Lye Solution
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution

Mixing Soap
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Earth Soap

I really enjoy spring. The flowers coming up, the birds singing, and the bright gentle rays of golden sun in the morning. I love mornings like that. Right now, the ground is covered with snow and what I truly miss is the brown earth. While I may not be able to see the dirt, I can make my own dirt soap. I just can’t wait to get dirty. ;-) (Is it just me or is there irony in a Dirt Soap? Dirt = Dirty, Messy. Soap = Squeaky Clean) Excited for spring? Come join me as we bring a little bit of Earth into our own homes. 

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil 

Water
Lye

 

Earth Fragrance Oil
Brown Oxide, Premixed

Equipment
Immersion Blender
Soap Spoon
Soap Bucket
Scale
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soy
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Sunflower Oil 

6 oz Water
2.2 oz Lye

.3 oz Earth Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Brown Oxide, Premixed

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soy
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Sunflower Oil 

170 grams Water
62 grams Lye

8.5 grams Earth Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Brown Oxide, Premixed

Recipe in Percentages
24.4% Hydrogenated Soy
24.4% Palm Kernel Oil
16.3% Sunflower Oil 

24.4% Water
8.9% Lye

1.2% Earth Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Brown Oxide, Premixed

Heat your oils gently until liquid. Mix lye into six ounces of water. Slowly pour lye solution into oils in the soap bucket. Using an immersion blender, mix until trace in reached. Add fragrance and color. I added about a tablespoon of mixed color. Mix well. Pour soap into mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Remove from mold and cut. Stack the bars to allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy and thank for joining me in the test kitchen!

Note: The premixed color was made by adding 2 oz of Brown Oxide to 16 oz Glycerin.

Taylor

Finished Soap
Lye Solution
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Adding Fragrance and Color
Mixing Soap

Poured into Mold
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Chai & Lavender Soap

I am a huge fan of spices. I love Chai tea, gingersnaps, spiced pound cake, spiced apple cider, carrot cake, curries and more. I am not a big fan of many floral scents. You won’t find to many in my personal collection. However, spice things up and I am there. (Uh-oh. Pun not intended.) :-) 

I was participating in the Valentine Swap that Andee hosted, when I decided I wanted to make a Spiced Lavender Soap. Yum! With this blend, I am a convert to the Lavender Fan Club. This scent is not super strong like the potpourri pine cones sold in December. It is light and polite. It may even make some converts to the Spice Fan Club! I enjoyed this soap so much I just had to share with everyone. Join me in the kitchen to make a soap with an exciting scent blend.

Collect needed items:

Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil 

Water
Lye

Lavender 40/42
Chai Latte Blend
Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Equipment
Immersion Blender
Soap Spoon
Soap Bucket
Scale
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soy
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Sunflower Oil 

6 oz Water
2.2 oz Lye

.15 oz Lavender 40/42
.15 oz Chai Latte Blend
Q.S. Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soy
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Sunflower Oil 

170 grams Water
2.2 oz Lye

4.25 grams Lavender 40/42
4.25 grams Chai Latte Blend
Q.S. Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Recipe in Percentages
24.4% Hydrogenated Soy
24.4% Palm Kernel Oil
16.3% Sunflower Oil 

24.4% Water
8.9% Lye

.6% Lavender 40/42
.6% Chai Latte Blend
Q.S. Lavender Fields Color, Premixed

Heat your oils gently until liquid. Mix lye into six ounces of water. Slowly pour lye solution into oils in the soap bucket. Using an immersion blender, mix until trace in reached. Add fragrance and color. Mix well. Pour soap into mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Remove from mold and cut. Stack the bars to allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy and thank for joining me in the test kitchen!

Taylor

Finished Soap

Mixing Lye Solution
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Adding Essential Oil Blend at Trace
Mixing Color into Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold
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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Blueberry Superfruit Soap

Yesterday I shared my adventure of making the Acai Superfruit Soap. In a way this soap is a continuation of that adventure, because when I pulled the tea out of the cupboard I also grabbed the Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea from Bigelow Tea. I decided that since I was going to make an Acai themed soap, I would also make a Blueberry themed soap. As you can probably guess, I’m going to use Blueberry Butter and Red Grape & Blueberry Fragrance Oil.

Blueberries don’t grow well in our alkaline soils, but I do enjoy the rare treat of fresh blueberries. This soap allows that enjoyment of these scrumptious berries to be a year round treat for the skin!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Blueberry Butter
Sweet Almond Oil
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea from Bigelow Tea
Red Grape & Blueberry Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I used Dirk’s Guerrilla Soap Mold)
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea: 20 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 3 minutes
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
4 ounces Blueberry Butter
4 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
8 ounces Coconut Oil
8 ounces Palm Oil
8 ounces Sunflower Oil

2 Blueberry Harvest Herbal Tea from Bigelow Tea
12 fl oz water
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide

0.56 ounces Red Grape & Blueberry Fragrance Oil

Just like the Acai Superfruit soap that I showed you yesterday, I prepared the tea the day before I made the soap. I used 13 ounces of water and 2 tea bags. I allowed the tea to steep for about 45 minutes and then I refrigerated the tea until the next day when I would have enough time to make soap. The next day I removed the tea from the refrigerator and allowed it to come to room temperature before doing anything else.

Measure the fixed oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the fixed oils in the microwave. It took about 2 minutes in my microwave to melt all of the oils.

As the oils are melting in the microwave, add sodium hydroxide to the tea. Mix well. Since I had already made the Acai Superfruit soap, I had an idea that the tea would change color when the sodium hydroxide was added. I was right, but this time the color change didn’t worry me! ;) At first, the lye solution was a olive green color and after the solution was completely mixed it settled on being a brownish-orange color.

Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. For me, this took almost 2 minutes to reach the thin trace. After the soap reached this point I added the fragrance and mixed well. Once the fragrance was completely mixed into the raw soap, I poured the soap into the Guerrilla Soap Mold. I allowed the soap to sit until was firm.

The next morning the soap was cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap was firm when I removed it from the mold after 24 hours. I sliced the soap into bars and was very surprised to find that the brownish-purple raw soap had a pinkish-brown color. I love this odd coloration and I’ll have to say that it is a great color.

This soap smells just like a mixed berry syrup without being extremely sweet, I bet this fragrance would be a favorite of kids especially when named, “Berry Blast” or “Berry Twisted Ice Cream.” Gee, just coming up with these names makes me want to act like a kid again. (Just for the fun dessert names!)

Tomorrow Taylor will take a turn at this microphone and share the beginning of her latest experiment that will cover two days. I think you will definitely find this interesting!

Enjoy!

Finished soap.
Completely measured fixed oils.
Brewed Blueberry tea.
Adding the sodium hydroxide to the tea.
Stirring the lye solution.
Completely mixed lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the melted oils.

Mixing the raw soap.

The blueberry (front) and acai (back) soaps in the mold.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Acai Superfruit Soap

With all the cold winter weather lately, you can be sure to find a warm cup of tea on my desk. As I was drinking a cup of Acai Green Tea from The Republic of Tea, I wondered what would happen if I used this tea in soap. Naturally I had to test this out. I decided to also use the Acai Butter for this soap because I thought it would be really cool to have both the Acai Green Tea and the Acai Butter in a soap. I decided that this soap needed just a little more of acai, so I decided to use the Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil to scent the soap.

What can I say? Acai is inspiring!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Acai Butter
Sweet Almond Oil
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water
Acai Green Tea bags from The Republic of Tea
Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I used Dirk’s Guerrilla Soap Mold)
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to Acai Green Tea: 20 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 3 minutes
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
4 ounces Acai Butter
4 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
8 ounces Coconut Oil
8 ounces Palm Oil
8 ounces Sunflower Oil

2 Acai Green Tea bags from The Republic of Tea
12 fl oz water
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide

0.56 ounces Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil

This soap took two days to make since I started making my tea as I would normally make it for drinking. I measured 13 oz of water and heated it until almost was boiling. This took about 2 minutes in my microwave. I removed the water from the microwave and added two tea bags to it. Most of the time you will want 1 bag or 1 teaspoon of tea for 6 ounces of water. You can always add a more tea for a stronger infusion if you would like.

As I was not going to drink this tea, I allowed the tea to steep for about 45 minutes. I wanted to be able to have a strong tea that was at room temperature. Due to my not so great timing the tea had cooled by the time the day had ended. I removed the teabags and then placed the tea in the refrigerator so I could come back the next day to make this soap.

First thing the next morning I removed the tea from the refrigerator and allowed it to come back to room temperature. I left the tea for about 90 minutes while it came back to room temperature. After the 90 minutes, I checked the temperature of the tea and it was warm enough that I could begin making soap.

Measure the fixed oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the fixed oils in the microwave. It took about 2 minutes in my microwave to melt all of the oils.

While the oils are melting in the microwave, add sodium hydroxide to the tea. Mix well. This will drastically change color, so don’t be alarmed. When I first added the sodium hydroxide to the tea, there was a color change to brown where the sodium hydroxide settled to the bottom. Then as I began mixing, the solution turned a rotten green and then brownish-orange! At this point, I started feeling as if this soap might actually be a bad idea. I decided since I had already mixed my lye solution and my oils were melted, that the only thing I could do was to continue making my soap.

Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. For me, this took almost 2 minutes to reach the thin trace. I had to wonder about that because I felt like I was making a Castile soap just for the long time that this soap took to reach thin trace. At this point I added the fragrance and mixed well. Once the fragrance was completely mixed into the raw soap, I poured the soap into the Guerrilla Soap Mold. I allowed the soap to sit until was firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap was firm when I removed it from the mold after 24 hours. I sliced the soap into bars and was very surprised to find that the brown soap had light swirls in it. I was perplexed, so I wandered over to Technical Support to ask why.

It turns out that this will happen when the stearine parts of the oils (most likely from the Palm Oil) were not completely melted and mixed. The soap is poured into the mold with these parts making a swirl. While the soap loaf goes through gel phase and completes the saponification, these separate oil components turn to soap and leave a decorative swirl pattern to the soap. These swirls are easily seen when the rest of the soap is a darker color.

I’m glad to know that my soap is just fine. I asked if this was easily duplicated and to my surprise, I was told yes. When making a batch of soap, have lower temperatures that are around 110° F and add partially melted Palm Oil or sprinkle Beeswax into the soap, lightly mix and promptly pour into the mold. I think I’ll have to try this purposely to see if I can make a tutorial for that!

This soap smells awesome, so I would highly recommend giving trying the Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance Oil for your next batch of soap. Definitely a sweet and fruity way to enjoy a shower!

Tomorrow I’ll share the Blueberry Soap that I made right after this one. I think you will enjoy it!

Enjoy!

Completed soap.
Fixed oils are ready to be melted.
Completely brewed Acai Green Tea.
The Acai Green Tea after adding sodium hydroxide.
Stirring the lye solution.
Wow! What a color change!
The lye solution as it cools.

Adding the lye solution to the oils.

Mixing the raw soap.

Adding fragrance to the soap.
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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)