Archive for the ‘Cold Process Soap’ Category

Clyde’s Shaving Soap

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014
Recently on the forum, Andee hosted a swap. It was called Ye Old Romance Swap. If you have never participated in a swap before, they are fun and addicting. Think of it like a Christmas gift from like-minded individuals. You get plenty of inspiration, feedback and the perfect place to strut your stuff. When Andee announced this swap, I just knew I had to be a part of it. 

Andee can tell you that whenever something with historical inspiration comes up, I tend to immediately gravitate to the floral aromas, rose in particular. Think of my Valentine’s Day Lotion with Rose Hydrosol. So you can imagine her shock when I said I wanted to do some things inspired by Bonnie and Clyde from the 1930s. You never know what you might be inspired to do when given a theme! Come join me in creating a swirled shaving soap with a fragrance blend just for Bonnie and Clyde.

I like to blend my fragrance oils prior to making my soap for the sake of simplicity. I know I won’t forget anything and I don’t need to worry about rushing around like a headless chicken. This also allows me to make enough for all of the projects I may have planned such as soap, lotion and whatever else my heart desires.

For my soap formulation, I stuck to our simple 6-5-4-1 formula. I used Lanolin as my luxury oil. I added clay, color and fragrance and I swirled my soap! These are all additions we have not made during the Introduction to Soap-making. We stuck with only changing the oils and the basics of soap making. Wow! This soap has a lot more to it!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lanolin
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Bentonite Clay
Black Onyx
Titanium Dioxide
Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
Jacob Fragrance Oil
Earth Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
Batch 1
255 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
213 grams Coconut Oil
170 grams Olive Oil
43 grams Lanolin
94 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
237 mL Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
10.21 grams Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
5.1 grams Jacob Fragrance Oil
1.13 grams Earth Fragrance Oil
Batch 2
255 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
213 grams Coconut Oil
170 grams Olive Oil
43 grams Lanolin
94 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
237 mL Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
10.21 grams Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
5.1 grams Jacob Fragrance Oil
1.13 grams Earth Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Ounces
Batch 1
9 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
7.5 oz Coconut Oil
6 oz Olive Oil
1.5 oz Lanolin
3.31 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
8 fl oz Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
0.36 oz Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
0.18 oz Jacob Fragrance Oil
0.04 oz Earth Fragrance Oil
Batch 2
9 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
7.5 oz Coconut Oil
6 oz Olive Oil
1.5 oz Lanolin
3.31 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
8 fl oz Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
0.36 oz Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
0.18 oz Jacob Fragrance Oil
0.04 oz Earth Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
Batch 1
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Lanolin
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Bentonite Clay
Q.S. Black Onyx
Q.S. Titanium Dioxide
Q.S. Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Jacob Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Earth Fragrance Oil
Batch 2
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Lanolin
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Bentonite Clay
Q.S. Black Onyx
Q.S. Titanium Dioxide
Q.S. Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Jacob Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Earth Fragrance Oil

Weigh the two selections of oils into two separate microwave safe containers. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to two containers of water to form two lye solutions. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. My temperatures for this soap were between 115°F and 120°F. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Add the color at this point. My color was dispersed into glycerin first. Stir well. Pour each color of soap into the mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Melted Oils and Lye Solution

Melted Oils and Lye Solution

Oils are still a little warm

Oils are still a little warm

Measuring Titanium Dioxide

Measuring Titanium Dioxide

Mixing Titanium Dioxide

Mixing Titanium Dioxide

Adding Black Color to Oils

Adding Black Color to Oils

Ready to Soap!

Ready to Soap!

Adding Titanium Dioxide

Adding Titanium Dioxide

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Clay

Adding Clay

Adding Clay to Black Soap

Adding Clay to Black Soap

Ready to Mix

Ready to Mix

Mixing White Soap

Mixing White Soap

Mixed White Soap

Mixed White Soap

Mixed Black Soap

Mixed Black Soap

Pouring White Soap into Mold

Pouring White Soap into Mold

Adding Black Soap

Adding Black Soap

Adding White Soap

Adding White Soap

Adding Black Soap

Adding Black Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

Soap Removed from Mold

Soap Removed from Mold

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Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Introduction to Soapmaking – Day 12

Monday, March 17th, 2014
During the last little bit, we have talked about the 6-5-4-1 soap recipe. We have even showcased several examples of how to approach the 6-5-4-1 concept. But for some of you, a big question is “Which recipe do I use?“. It really depends on what you will be doing with your soap. If you are going to be adding colors, a white colored soap is better than a tan one. 

I have collected all of the soap we have made to compare colors. Which colors do you like the best? Which recipe do you think you will make the most? This is also the perfect time to ask any remaining questions you might have. I hope you had as much fun as I did! Happy soaping!

Taylor

Collection of Finished Soaps

Collection of Finished Soaps

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Introduction to Soap Making – Day 11

Saturday, March 15th, 2014
Today is the last of the Introduction to Soap Making Series. Thanks for joining. It has been fun. I will have another post with all of the soaps lined up for you to visually compare but today is the last day we will be making soap for this series. Now I wanted to end this series with a bit of a bang. Are you ready for today’s oil. Drum roll… Today we will be using Neem!

 

Now if you have ever made anything with Neem, you know Neem has a very strong odor. So strong, you could even say it reeks! Why on earth would someone want to make soap with Neem?!

Neem has been used topically to aid in the healing of skin. Neem is even used in some OTC drugs that are available today! Neem has also been used to treat nits, hair lice and even insect infestations on plants.

Because of the intense odor that Neem has, I am going to limit it to less than 1% of my total batch. I chose to use Macadamia Nut Oil to complete my 1 oz of luxury oils.

My finished soap had a very mild Neem odor to it. It is still there but it is at a manageable level. I think this soap would handle the addition of a more earthy fragrance oil nicely.

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Macadamia Nut Oil
Neem Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
26.1 grams Macadamia Nut Oil
2.9 grams Neem Oil
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
0.9 oz Macadamia Nut Oil
0.1 oz Neem Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
5.62% Macadamia Nut Oil
0.62% Neem Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Pouring Raw Soap into Mold

Pouring Raw Soap into Mold

Raw Soap in Mold

Raw Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 10

Friday, March 14th, 2014
I am so excited to share today’s soap. Today we will be making soap with Seabuckthorn Oil. Why is this exciting? Seabuckthorn is so potent in color, we will actually be using less than 1% of the oil in our soap! This is really exciting news for soapmakers. This means naturally vibrant colors are achieved with low usage rates. Seabuckthorn is also reputed to have regenerative properties, meaning your skin heals and renews faster.

 

Because our usage rate of Seabuckthorn Oil is so low, we are completing the rest of our 1 oz of luxury oil with another luxury oil. I decided on using Avocado Oil. Avocado Oil contributes small bubbly lather. It is also higher in unsaponifiable oils. This gives the soap a more emollient feeling. Want creamy, luxurious feeling soap? Avocado Oil is a great answer!

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Avocado Oil
Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
26.1 grams Avocado Oil
2.9 grams Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
0.9 oz Avocado Oil
0.1 oz Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
5.62% Avocado Oil
0.62% Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Finished Soap in Mold

Finished Soap in Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 9

Thursday, March 13th, 2014
I adore roses. Pink ones, red ones, white ones, peachy ones! So when I was choosing a selection of oils to teach the basics of soap making, I couldn’t pass up the chance to use our Organic Rose Hip Oil. Why? Rose Hip Oil is great for all skin types but works particularly well with skin that needs a little TLC (tender loving care).

 

Rose Hip Oil is also used extensively in formulations for mature skin. Soaps with Rose Hip Oil are commonly request by my older family members for Christmas and/or birthdays. I love how it is requested by not just the women of the family but some of the men too! This makes it super easy to have great gifts ready all the time.

I chose our Organic Rose Hip because it has a little more color than our regular Rose Hip. I wanted my soap to have a natural yellow. This soap reminds me a little of some of the butter yellow colored roses that are available. Very pretty.

Just one ounce of Organic Rose Hip really added a lot color color to this bar. If you really like the color of this soap but want to use another luxury oil, you can use a botanical like paprika and infuse it into one of your base oils like coconut, palm or soy. These oils generally give a white bar, but don’t feel limited to a naturally white bar. The rainbow is the limit!

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Rose Hip Oil, Organic
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
29 grams Rose Hip Oil, Organic
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
1 oz Rose Hip Oil, Organic
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
6.25% Rose Hip Oil, Organic
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap with Rose Hip Oil

Finished Soap with Rose Hip Oil

Finished Soap in Mold

Finished Soap in Mold

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 8

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014
Another day, another soap. How exciting! Before we get too far into the Blog Kitchen, I want to ask, “what recipe has been your favorite so far?” I think the one I have liked the most has been the one containing lanolin but todays soap just might beat it. Come find out why! 

For today’s soap, our luxury oil will be Meadowfoam! This wonderful oil contributes to the emoliency of the final soap. We know what that means. Happier skin! It will also contribute a warmer toned color to the soap. You will not get a natural white bar when working with Meadowfoam Oil.

Now some of you may be wondering why I chose such an expensive oil to be in a wash off product. At that price, it is clearly cost effective to put it in other products such as lip balms, lotions and creams, right? Yes, but before you dismiss Meadowfoam, I ask that you give it a chance.

While putting Meadowfoam into every single soap may be cost prohibitive, it does make a great, silky bar. How silky do you ask? So silky, and creamy that my garden roughened hands sighed with pleasure when I washed my hands with this soap. I would reserve bars with Meadowfoam for people whose skin needs a little extra love and care.

For my 6-5-4 oils, I used my standard Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Coconut Oil and Olive Oil. Do you just love the 6-5-4-1 formula? It is so simple. I love that I don’t have to worry about complicated formulas or rules. We just keep it simple.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Meadowfoam Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Meadowfoam Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Meadowfoam Oil
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Meadow Foam Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!

 

 

Taylor

Cut Soap

Cut Soap

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Mixing Oils and Lye Solution

Mixing Oils and Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 7

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014
Wahoo! We made it to Tuesday. Whew! Do you have anything exciting planned? I do! Today we are going to be making a soap with lanolin. Come join us today to find out why soaps containing lanolin have such a loyal following. 

So, where does lanolin come from? Every spring sheep are sheared for their wool. We take the wool to keep us warm in the winter AND to keep the sheep cool in the summer. During the washing process, lanolin is removed from the wool. It is then cleaned again to give us a wonderful product that can be added to our soap, lotions, creams and lip balms.

Lanolin has a high content of waxy esters that don’t saponify. This is why soaps with extremely high lanolin content stay very soft. However those waxy esters are what give the soap its emollient properties. Adding lanolin to your soap formulation also makes it temperature sensitive. Watch your temperatures when making a soap containing lanolin!

I have heard many people comment on how wonderful lanolin soap are. One of the best descriptions of lanolin soap I have heard is that after washing with the soap, it feels like a light lotion has already been applied to the skin. Spinners, knitters, secretaries and computer geeks all enjoy lanolin soaps. (Just call and ask Dirk, our resident IT guy.) I suspect a lanolin soap would be a welcome gift to someone who washes their hands frequently and their hands become dry and cracked.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lanolin
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Lanolin
63 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Lanolin
2.21 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Lanolin
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size. For this batch, my temperatures were 110 for my lye solution and 120 for my oils.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Ready to Remove Soap from Mold

Ready to Remove Soap from Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Preparing to Mix

Preparing to Mix

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 6

Monday, March 10th, 2014
We have made a few batches of soap already. Has anyone cut their soap yet? I want to hear how your soaps look, smell and feel!

 

Today we are going to use Tamanu Oil as our luxury oil. Tamanu Oil is used for the same reason Emu Oil is. It adds great emollient  properties, making a soap feel more conditioning and luxurious. It has a little less emollients than Emu Oil but adds a beautiful color and faint nutty odor that is very enjoyable.

If you are to use Tamanu Oil in your soaps with a fragrance, I would recommend more earthy, musky or nutty scents. Florals would not be a good mix.

I used Coconut Oil for lots of good lather and Hydrogenated Soybean Oil to help lighten the color from the Tamanu Oil. I personally prefer lighter colored bars of soap.

 

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Tamanu Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Tamanu Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Tamanu Oil
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Tamanu Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this batch my temperature were 128°F for my oils and 114°F for my lye solution.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Preparing to Remove Soap from Mold

Preparing to Remove Soap from Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Preparing to Mix

Preparing to Mix

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 5

Thursday, March 6th, 2014
Today we are going to make a soap I have been looking forward to all week! The luxury oil I will be using today is Emu Oil. Now some of you may be wondering why on earth someone would want to put oil from a bird in soap!

 

Emu Oil adds incredible emollient properties to soap. If you are wondering what emollient means, let me explain this phrase to you. The word emollient comes from Latin meaning to soften or relax. Soaps high in emollient oils are more conditioning. They make your skin feel soft and smooth.

I used both Coconut Oil and Palm Kernel Oil for some super lather in this soap. Many people associate many bubbles with being clean and because this soap will feel so different due to the Emu Oil, I wanted to make sure people still think they are getting clean.

I also switch my oils around a little for today’s soap. If my soap has 6 oz of Palm Kernel Oil and 5 oz of Coconut Oil, my bar is going to be brittle and have razor sharp edges. Changing thing around means that the edges will be softer and rounder.

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Emu Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
29 grams Emu Oil
70 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
1 oz Emu Oil
2.46 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut
6.25% Emu Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this particular batch the temperature of my lye solution were 116°F and my oils were 124°F.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Removing Soap from Mold

Removing Soap from Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 4

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014
Today I want to make soaps with Palm Kernel Oil and Palm Oil. These oils are both used extensively in luxury soaps and are friendly to the pocket book of soapers. Have you ever made soap with either of these oils? What do you think about them? Do you want to try them? 

Palm Kernel Oil is our foundation oil for today’s soap. Palm Kernel Oil makes an almost brittle, white bar. Palm Kernel Oil makes an excellent base for soaps that are high in oils that makes soft bars. Palm Kernel Oil is also a lathering machine just like Coconut Oil.

Palm Oil is what is often referred to as Vegetable Tallow. Palm Oil makes a firm, pale straw-yellow soap. It contributes minimal lather.

Today there is a lot of concern with sustainability with Palm Oil. So much so that the soaping industry has changed some what. However, don’t forget, palm is very good at what it does. I will talk about sustainability of palm in another post so stay tuned! Palm is a stable oil that makes a hard bar. It can have some problems with fractionation but treating it correctly makes a huge difference. Read about how to deal with fractionated Palm Oil here. Proper treatment of Palm Oil greatly reduces one of the most common problems associated with it, DOS.

Are you ready? Let’s go make some soap. Don’t forget, if you have any questions, let us know and we will do our best to answer them!

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Palm Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
142 grams Palm Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Palm Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Palm Kernel Oil
31.25% Palm Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this soap, my oils were 126° F and my lye solution was 118°F.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Removing Soap from Mold

Removing Soap from Mold

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Melted Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Melted Oils

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)