Category Archives: Cold Process Soap

Caramel Apple Cold Process Soap

Finished bars of soap after being cut.
Finished bars of soap after being cut.
I remember being a teen and having braces. While they were uncomfortable to wear, I remember helping my mom make batches of soft, melt-in-your-mouth caramel that I could eat without damaging my braces. One time, we made a mistake and ended up with a fantastic caramel sauce that was delicious drizzled over apple slices. We still make the caramel sauce to this day and it is always enjoyed!

The release of our new Green Apple and Caramel Toffee flavors had me thinking about the caramels that we used to make and how I loved to pair the caramel sauce with apples. Since I’ve made a Caramel Apple Lip balm, I have to make a soap that is complementary. Come with me and we’ll make a great batch of Caramel Apple Soap!

Continue reading

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Soap & Sage Leaves: Cold Process Soap with an Oil Infusion

Sage is one of my favorite herbs. Now, I might be a little biased due to our name, but I love the scent of sun kissed sage in the afternoon. The warm, herbal scent is comforting to me. It doesn’t bring much of the way in food memories to mind, since I primarily grow the plant just for the looks rather than culinary uses.

As I can’t go anywhere without thinking what would be fun to use in soap, I decided to harvest some of the sage leaves and dry them for use in soap. I collected the leaves I wanted and then dried them on a cooling rack used for baking. It didn’t take much time for the sage leaves to dry in our arid Utah climate! After the sage had dried, I had a brown lunch bag filled with dried leaves.I decided to divide the amount into three groups so I could make three different soaps.

Join me today as I make my first batch of cold process soap with dried sage leaves and an oil infusion!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Dried Sage Leaves
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
7.1 grams dried sage leaves
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
0.25 oz dried sage leaves
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Dried Sage Leaves

I began by weighing the oils into a microwave safe container. Then I placed into the microwave and gently heated. Once all the oils had been melted, I added the dry sage leaves to the oil. I let the leaves and oil sit for about 24 hours. When I came back the next day, the oil had solidified so I placed the container back in the microwave to melt the oil again.

While the oils were heating again, I weighed the lye. I slowly added the lye to a container of water I had measured out before melting the oils again. DO NOT add water to your container of lye.

Once the oil had been melted completely, I removed the sage leaves. The leaves were still relatively dry, despite sitting the oil for 24 hours. I suspect this is due to the fact that the oils had cooled and solidified. The weight of my oils changed by 0.08 of an ounce (2.27 grams), so I left my calculated lye amount as I had originally calculated. That being said, I won’t be doing that again! Next time, I will place my dried botanicals in a single oil (preferably liquid at room temperature) and then weigh out the needed amount of oil.

Once my lye solution and oils were within an ideal temperature range*, I slowly poured the lye solution into the oils. I used an immersion blender to mix the oils and lye solution together until I reached trace. After I achieved trace, I poured the soap into the mold and allowed the soap to sit undisturbed for 24 hours.

I came back after 24 hours and cut the soap into bars. Then I placed the cut bars of soap on a piece of cardboard and arranged them to allow for good air flow between bars. I placed the bars on my curing shelf and made a note of their starting weight. As the curing process is the time that allows for any excess water to evaporate, soap cures fairly quickly in our dry climate.

Soap Notes: As I was mixing the soap, it had a slight pinkish hue. That pinkish hue did disappear while the soap was going through the gel phase and the final bar had a nice creamy color.

*Temperature Note: For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. This particular batch had temperatures around 120°F.

I had so much fun making this soap! Stop by tomorrow and we’ll try another batch with sage leaves!

Andee

Our sage is blooming!
Our sage is blooming!
Dried sage leaves.
Dried sage leaves.
The dried sage leaves sitting in the soap oils.
The dried sage leaves sitting in the soap oils.
Melted oils after removing the sage.
Melted oils after removing the sage.
Adding the lye solution to the oils.
Adding the lye solution to the oils.
Mixing the oils and lye solution together.
Mixing the oils and lye solution together.

Soap after being poured into the mold.
Soap after being poured into the mold.
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Soapmakers: Thoughts on calculating water or using discounts

Clean WaterDear Soapmakers,

Recently I have become aware of some difficulties soap makers are having while trying to figure their water needs. Let me try to help clear the air (water?) here.

1) Water is needed in your soap making process. This is not an ingredient that needs to be weighed to 1/100th of an ounce accuracy. Any excess water will evaporate so only worry about non-variable ingredients when you spend time weighing.

2) Always base your water needs on the amount of fat and never the amount of lye. Recent comments to me indicate that some people are teaching to use an amount of water that is double the amount of the lye needed. Let’s cover two examples:
a batch of soap that is 16 ounces of oils, the lye calculation needs 3.68 ounces, water would then be 7.36 ounces
second batch of soap that is 16 ounces of oils, the lye calculation needs 1.55 ounces, water would then be 3.10 ounces.

For the first batch in this example 7.36 ounces of water is quite fluid yet still workable. It will take longer for the soap to cure because the extra water must evaporate. Trace may be slow to come because of the excess water.

The second batch has too little water, trace will happen very quickly, it will be difficult to color or scent because the soap progresses too fast. Both batches are the same size, 16 ounces of fat. The first batch will likely be 22 to 23 ounces of finished soap, the second batch will likely be 20 to 21 ounces of finished soap.

How to correctly calculate the amount of water needed for each batch:

Calculate the amount of fat you are using. Multiply this amount by 32 to 42%. If you live where: the air is so dry your sheets crunch when you crawl into bed, daily reports of how low the relative humidity is in your region appear on the evening news, without supplemented water your lawn will be brown for 11 months of the year then you know you need closer to the 42%. This is about to 6.75 fluid ounces per lb of fats. If you can’t remember when the last dry day happened, mold is a constant problem, moss grows on every roof top in your city, and everyone uses the term muggy or damp on a daily basis, or if you own and use a rain coat/slicker regularly – you should use closer to 32% which is about to 5 fl oz per lb of fats. You may have needs to use more or less water than these amounts but at least you are now calculating for your needs instead of aiming for moving, unreliable target.

Think I might have missed the mark? If so, then why do we use different amounts of scenting oils when we make peppermint soap vs vanilla soap? Different needs require different amounts. Use what you need, not what is excessive or too little.

Need help with your recipes? Just comment on this blog and I will help walk you through the math.

Cheers!
Tina

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Caffe Latte Cold Process Soap

Caffe Latte Soap
Caffe Latte Soap

Recently, we offered a beginners soap making class, we had a few students that never made soap before and some that had made a few batches but wanted to focus on the cold process soap-making techniques. During this class each participant had the opportunity to make several batches of soap and since we were in the blog kitchen we couldn’t help ourselves and started digging into the drawers and cupboards for new ideas. This beginners class soon covered some more advanced topics such as adding fragrances, additives, colors, essential oils, glitter, and espresso. Every batch we did we tried something new, we soon lost track of time made 20+ batches of soap and had gone through all the drawers and cupboards in the blog kitchen. So much fun!

In this blog I am going to share with you the Caffe Latte soap that we created in this class. This first started with everyone needing a beverage and as we traveled around the room for requests I asked Andee for a iced coffee (she makes the best). Well this got our ideas going and we asked Andee to make us some espresso for making – why not? a Caffe Latte soap! Swapping a portion of the water/lye mixture with espresso was a good start. Then we came up with coffee oil, coffee grounds, Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil. To do this we used two 1lb batches of soap, one we would be simulating the coffee portion and the other would be the cream portion.

While making the coffee portion we added the espresso into they lye mixture, this made the soap a really dark brown color. My favorite! We also added in some of the coffee oil this gave it a strong coffee scent. This will definitely wake you up, without the caffeine of course. The creamy top for our soap we added in a Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil and ground up coffee beans for sprinkling on the top.

Here are the ingredients and recipe.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Coffee Oil
Coffee Grounds
Espresso
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

We first poured the espresso added batch to fill the mold to the half way point, then poured the second creamy batch on top. Sprinkled with finely ground coffee beans to give that chocolate sprinkled effect. Wow, this soap smells wonderful! What a great fun idea and it sure wakes up your senses every time you use it.

Enjoy and see you soon in our next soap making class!

Tonya

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Clyde’s Shaving Soap

Recently on the forum, Andee hosted a swap. It was called Ye Old Romance Swap. If you have never participated in a swap before, they are fun and addicting. Think of it like a Christmas gift from like-minded individuals. You get plenty of inspiration, feedback and the perfect place to strut your stuff. When Andee announced this swap, I just knew I had to be a part of it. 

Andee can tell you that whenever something with historical inspiration comes up, I tend to immediately gravitate to the floral aromas, rose in particular. Think of my Valentine’s Day Lotion with Rose Hydrosol. So you can imagine her shock when I said I wanted to do some things inspired by Bonnie and Clyde from the 1930s. You never know what you might be inspired to do when given a theme! Come join me in creating a swirled shaving soap with a fragrance blend just for Bonnie and Clyde.

I like to blend my fragrance oils prior to making my soap for the sake of simplicity. I know I won’t forget anything and I don’t need to worry about rushing around like a headless chicken. This also allows me to make enough for all of the projects I may have planned such as soap, lotion and whatever else my heart desires.

For my soap formulation, I stuck to our simple 6-5-4-1 formula. I used Lanolin as my luxury oil. I added clay, color and fragrance and I swirled my soap! These are all additions we have not made during the Introduction to Soap-making. We stuck with only changing the oils and the basics of soap making. Wow! This soap has a lot more to it!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lanolin
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Bentonite Clay
Black Onyx
Titanium Dioxide
Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
Jacob Fragrance Oil
Earth Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
Batch 1
255 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
213 grams Coconut Oil
170 grams Olive Oil
43 grams Lanolin
94 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
237 mL Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
10.21 grams Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
5.1 grams Jacob Fragrance Oil
1.13 grams Earth Fragrance Oil
Batch 2
255 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
213 grams Coconut Oil
170 grams Olive Oil
43 grams Lanolin
94 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
237 mL Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
10.21 grams Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
5.1 grams Jacob Fragrance Oil
1.13 grams Earth Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Ounces
Batch 1
9 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
7.5 oz Coconut Oil
6 oz Olive Oil
1.5 oz Lanolin
3.31 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
8 fl oz Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
0.36 oz Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
0.18 oz Jacob Fragrance Oil
0.04 oz Earth Fragrance Oil
Batch 2
9 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
7.5 oz Coconut Oil
6 oz Olive Oil
1.5 oz Lanolin
3.31 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
8 fl oz Water
2 tsp Bentonite Clay
1 tsp Black Onyx
1 tsp Titanium Dioxide
0.36 oz Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
0.18 oz Jacob Fragrance Oil
0.04 oz Earth Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
Batch 1
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Lanolin
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Bentonite Clay
Q.S. Black Onyx
Q.S. Titanium Dioxide
Q.S. Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Jacob Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Earth Fragrance Oil
Batch 2
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Lanolin
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Bentonite Clay
Q.S. Black Onyx
Q.S. Titanium Dioxide
Q.S. Bergamot & Tobacco Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Jacob Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Earth Fragrance Oil

Weigh the two selections of oils into two separate microwave safe containers. Heat gently until liquid. Add the Sodium Hydroxide to two containers of water to form two lye solutions. Allow the oils and the lye to cool to a lower temperature. My temperatures for this soap were between 115°F and 120°F. We do not want to have the soap overheat and volcano. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until trace is achieved. Add the color at this point. My color was dispersed into glycerin first. Stir well. Pour each color of soap into the mold. Allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!
Taylor

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
Weighed Oils
Weighed Oils
Melted Oils and Lye Solution
Melted Oils and Lye Solution
Oils are still a little warm
Oils are still a little warm
Measuring Titanium Dioxide
Measuring Titanium Dioxide
Mixing Titanium Dioxide
Mixing Titanium Dioxide
Adding Black Color to Oils
Adding Black Color to Oils
Ready to Soap!
Ready to Soap!
Adding Titanium Dioxide
Adding Titanium Dioxide
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Clay
Adding Clay
Adding Clay to Black Soap
Adding Clay to Black Soap
Ready to Mix
Ready to Mix
Mixing White Soap
Mixing White Soap
Mixed White Soap
Mixed White Soap
Mixed Black Soap
Mixed Black Soap
Pouring White Soap into Mold
Pouring White Soap into Mold
Adding Black Soap
Adding Black Soap
Adding White Soap
Adding White Soap
Adding Black Soap
Adding Black Soap
Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold

Soap Removed from Mold
Soap Removed from Mold
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Introduction to Soapmaking – Day 12

During the last little bit, we have talked about the 6-5-4-1 soap recipe. We have even showcased several examples of how to approach the 6-5-4-1 concept. But for some of you, a big question is “Which recipe do I use?“. It really depends on what you will be doing with your soap. If you are going to be adding colors, a white colored soap is better than a tan one. 

I have collected all of the soap we have made to compare colors. Which colors do you like the best? Which recipe do you think you will make the most? This is also the perfect time to ask any remaining questions you might have. I hope you had as much fun as I did! Happy soaping!

Taylor

Collection of Finished Soaps
Collection of Finished Soaps
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 11

Today is the last of the Introduction to Soap Making Series. Thanks for joining. It has been fun. I will have another post with all of the soaps lined up for you to visually compare but today is the last day we will be making soap for this series. Now I wanted to end this series with a bit of a bang. Are you ready for today’s oil. Drum roll… Today we will be using Neem!

 

Now if you have ever made anything with Neem, you know Neem has a very strong odor. So strong, you could even say it reeks! Why on earth would someone want to make soap with Neem?!

Neem has been used topically to aid in the healing of skin. Neem is even used in some OTC drugs that are available today! Neem has also been used to treat nits, hair lice and even insect infestations on plants.

Because of the intense odor that Neem has, I am going to limit it to less than 1% of my total batch. I chose to use Macadamia Nut Oil to complete my 1 oz of luxury oils.

My finished soap had a very mild Neem odor to it. It is still there but it is at a manageable level. I think this soap would handle the addition of a more earthy fragrance oil nicely.

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Macadamia Nut Oil
Neem Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
26.1 grams Macadamia Nut Oil
2.9 grams Neem Oil
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
0.9 oz Macadamia Nut Oil
0.1 oz Neem Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
5.62% Macadamia Nut Oil
0.62% Neem Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
Weighed Oils
Weighed Oils
Making Lye Solution
Making Lye Solution
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Mixed Soap
Mixed Soap
Pouring Raw Soap into Mold
Pouring Raw Soap into Mold

Raw Soap in Mold
Raw Soap in Mold
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 10

I am so excited to share today’s soap. Today we will be making soap with Seabuckthorn Oil. Why is this exciting? Seabuckthorn is so potent in color, we will actually be using less than 1% of the oil in our soap! This is really exciting news for soapmakers. This means naturally vibrant colors are achieved with low usage rates. Seabuckthorn is also reputed to have regenerative properties, meaning your skin heals and renews faster.

 

Because our usage rate of Seabuckthorn Oil is so low, we are completing the rest of our 1 oz of luxury oil with another luxury oil. I decided on using Avocado Oil. Avocado Oil contributes small bubbly lather. It is also higher in unsaponifiable oils. This gives the soap a more emollient feeling. Want creamy, luxurious feeling soap? Avocado Oil is a great answer!

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Avocado Oil
Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
26.1 grams Avocado Oil
2.9 grams Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
0.9 oz Avocado Oil
0.1 oz Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
5.62% Avocado Oil
0.62% Seabuckthorn Fruit Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
Finished Soap in Mold
Finished Soap in Mold
Weighed Oils
Weighed Oils
Making Lye Solution
Making Lye Solution
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Pouring Soap into Mold
Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 9

I adore roses. Pink ones, red ones, white ones, peachy ones! So when I was choosing a selection of oils to teach the basics of soap making, I couldn’t pass up the chance to use our Organic Rose Hip Oil. Why? Rose Hip Oil is great for all skin types but works particularly well with skin that needs a little TLC (tender loving care).

 

Rose Hip Oil is also used extensively in formulations for mature skin. Soaps with Rose Hip Oil are commonly request by my older family members for Christmas and/or birthdays. I love how it is requested by not just the women of the family but some of the men too! This makes it super easy to have great gifts ready all the time.

I chose our Organic Rose Hip because it has a little more color than our regular Rose Hip. I wanted my soap to have a natural yellow. This soap reminds me a little of some of the butter yellow colored roses that are available. Very pretty.

Just one ounce of Organic Rose Hip really added a lot color color to this bar. If you really like the color of this soap but want to use another luxury oil, you can use a botanical like paprika and infuse it into one of your base oils like coconut, palm or soy. These oils generally give a white bar, but don’t feel limited to a naturally white bar. The rainbow is the limit!

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Rose Hip Oil, Organic
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
29 grams Rose Hip Oil, Organic
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
1 oz Rose Hip Oil, Organic
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
6.25% Rose Hip Oil, Organic
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap with Rose Hip Oil
Finished Soap with Rose Hip Oil
Finished Soap in Mold
Finished Soap in Mold
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Making Lye Solution
Making Lye Solution
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Mixed Soap
Mixed Soap
Pouring Soap into Mold
Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 8

Another day, another soap. How exciting! Before we get too far into the Blog Kitchen, I want to ask, “what recipe has been your favorite so far?” I think the one I have liked the most has been the one containing lanolin but todays soap just might beat it. Come find out why! 

For today’s soap, our luxury oil will be Meadowfoam! This wonderful oil contributes to the emoliency of the final soap. We know what that means. Happier skin! It will also contribute a warmer toned color to the soap. You will not get a natural white bar when working with Meadowfoam Oil.

Now some of you may be wondering why I chose such an expensive oil to be in a wash off product. At that price, it is clearly cost effective to put it in other products such as lip balms, lotions and creams, right? Yes, but before you dismiss Meadowfoam, I ask that you give it a chance.

While putting Meadowfoam into every single soap may be cost prohibitive, it does make a great, silky bar. How silky do you ask? So silky, and creamy that my garden roughened hands sighed with pleasure when I washed my hands with this soap. I would reserve bars with Meadowfoam for people whose skin needs a little extra love and care.

For my 6-5-4 oils, I used my standard Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Coconut Oil and Olive Oil. Do you just love the 6-5-4-1 formula? It is so simple. I love that I don’t have to worry about complicated formulas or rules. We just keep it simple.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Meadowfoam Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Meadowfoam Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Meadowfoam Oil
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Meadow Foam Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!

 

 

Taylor

Cut Soap
Cut Soap
Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils
Making Lye Solution
Making Lye Solution
Melted Oils
Melted Oils
Mixing Oils and Lye Solution
Mixing Oils and Lye Solution
Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap
Mixed Soap
Mixed Soap
Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold

Finished Soap
Finished Soap
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)