Category Archives: Cold Process Soap

Creative Fixes and Ideas – Day 1

Okay, so I have made some doozy mistakes when making  lotions, scrubs and soaps. While mistakes can be rather disheartening, the good news it that many are fixable. This week we will be covering a number of mistakes that can happen and how you can fix them! Come join us. This is one week you don’t want to miss!

So let me start at the beginning. When I make a mistake in my math, it tends to leave spectacular results. Anyone remember my conversion catastrophe? That was a mathematical disaster!

Anyway, as we have has a few days of cooler weather recently I started thinking about making soaps for fall. After all, one does need to make sure the bathrooms and showers are fully stocked with good soap. As I perused the fragrance collection, I decided on using Honey Almond.

I love the smell of Honey Almond. It reminds me of a fresh baked Almond Loaf or of a decadent Bee Sting. Both pasties are absolutely divine. These items always remind me of the days where the nights suggest impending fall yet the days still feel like summer.

I sat down and planned out my soap. I planned on making a 3 lb batch. I calculated my lye and my fragrance. I decided on a strong scent. For a 3 lb batch, our fragrance calculator recommends 2.25% fragrance. Or 1.08 oz of fragrance. I neglected to ensure I had enough Shea Butter to make my soap. (Some of you may be able to see what it coming.)

So I went to the kitchen and started to weigh my materials. I actually weighed my fragrance out first. Then I moved onto my fixed oils. I started with my Shea Butter and discovered I only had enough to make a 1 lb batch of soap. Just as I was finished redoing my calculations, the doorbell rang.

After coming back from answering the door, I got back to my soapmaking. Except I forgot to adjust my amount of fragrance oil! After all, it was already measured out.

I proceeded to make my soap. I remember picking up my container of fragrance and thinking “Gosh, that seems like a lot.”  After I added my fragrance to my soap I was assaulted with an eye-watering cloud of Honey Almond Fragrance Oil. As I stirred my soap, I thought “I wonder why this is so intense. I don’t remember it being this strong.” I poured my soap into my mold and left it for the next day.

Fast forward to when I unmold my soap. The fragrance was still overpowering! So I went to check my notes and found I had not adjusted my amount of fragrance oil. (Notes are so critical!) Whoops! Now what do I do with this overly scented soap? This is way too strong to be elevator friendly, let alone bathroom friendly.  So how do we fix this?!

Well, we can either shred the soap and make a confetti soap or we can cut it into chunks and make a mosaic style soap. I personally tend to prefer the confetti style soaps because I can quickly shred my soap and move onto my other projects. Choose whichever you prefer. Because I used almost 7% fragrance, I will need to make 2 lbs of unscented soap. (It is what I had planned originally. Sort of.)

I shredded my soap and place my shreds into my mold. I then poured my unscented soap over those shreds.  Whew! A near disaster averted. Now just to wait to cut the soap. What do you think? Pretty cool for a soap.

Taylor

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Making Soap with Castor Oil

Finished Castor Oil Soap
Finished Castor Oil Soap

As a soapmaker, when you first start looking at formulating your own recipe, it can be overwhelming with all the different types of oils out there. What do you choose? One oil that is often recommended is Castor Oil. Castor Oil is a wonderful oil that boosts lather in soap. However in areas with hard water, it can create an overwhelming amount of soap scum.

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

Does this mean those of us with hard water have to forgo the luxurious lather from Castor Oil? No, we just have to treat Castor Oil as one of our luxury oils.

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Castor Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
156 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
14 grams Castor Oil
65 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
5.5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
0.5 oz Castor Oil
2.28 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
34% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
38% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
3% Castor Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

Now to make soap. Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water. Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. Safety first!

Waiting for mixtures to cool
Waiting for mixtures to cool

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and set up my mold during this period. This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 100°F-110°F, add your lye solution to your oils. (Using these lower temperatures results in a smoother textured soap.) Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace.

Ready to Mix
Ready to Mix

Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk not cooked custard or pudding. That is pretty fluid!

Mixing Oils and Lye Solution
Mixing Oils and Lye Solution

Allow your soap to sit in the mold undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. I like to use cardboard boxes under my soap so I don’t damage my shelves. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. The best part is you can have them included in qualifying order for free! Let our order desk know if you want a pack.

Pouring Soap into Mold. See how fluid it is?
Pouring Soap into Mold. See how fluid it is?

Taylor

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Wool Wash Bar

I love wool clothing. I don’t have much patience when it comes to knitting or crocheting sweaters, socks, hats, mittens and scarves. However, each wool article in my closet is a treasured item. There is just something about wool that is so soft and warm. I love that. There is just one problem. Taking care of your wool garments can take a little work.

Weighing Coconut Oil
Weighing Coconut Oil

Many modern detergents and laundry softeners are great with cotton, rayon, spandex and even bamboo but they turn wool into one of the most itchy items you own in a heartbeat. Talk about absolutely aggravating. Today I wanted to make a wool wash bar that gently cleans and softens the fiber while keeping its life and integrity. Tomorrow we will make a wool conditioner and Friday I will show you how to wash and care for your wool items. Continue reading Wool Wash Bar

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Tomato Paste Soap

Finished Tomato Soap
Finished Tomato Soap

I get asked on a regular basis what kind of soap I tend to make the most. That is the hardest question to answer because I am always trying something new. One of my most recent experiments has been with using tomato paste in soap.

It makes such a beautiful color. I recommend no more the 0.75 oz of tomato paste per pound of fats. Just remember, the color of the soap is not UV stable so if you store your soap in an area that gets lots of light, don’t be surprised if the color fades.

Continue reading Tomato Paste Soap

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Starting with Soap – Day 12

Finished Soap with Jojoba Oil
Finished Soap with Jojoba Oil

You know how when you stumble on something that just makes you super excited? That is how I feel about soapmaking. I can’t wait to try a new fixed oil, fragrance oil or new color. There is this thrill I get when I cut out the  first bar of soap in a batch. It is just so exciting. Andee finds it hilarious when I will slice a sliver of soap off, rush to the sink and proceed to wash until the sliver has disappeared. Often I find her joining me at the sink to try my latest experiment. What can I say? Excitement is infectious!

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

Today I wanted to make a soap with Jojoba Oil. Now the name is a little confusing because Jojoba Oil is actually a wax that is liquid at room temperature. It is also higher in unsaponifiable materials. (Jojoba Oil has almost 50% unsaponifiable material.) This doesn’t help when you are looking for a lather booster but it certainly makes your finished soap feel creamy and luxurious. Because of this, I like to limit how much Jojoba Oil I use. There is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Jojoba Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
156 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
14 grams Jojoba Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
5.5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
0.5 oz Jojoba Oil
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
31.25% Coconut Oil
28.12% Olive Oil
37.50% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
3.12% Jojoba Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

Now onto our soapmaking! Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water. Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. Safety first!

Ready to make soap
Ready to make soap

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and set up my mold during this period. This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 100°F-110°F, add your lye solution to your oils. Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace.

Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk not cooked custard. That is pretty fluid!

Pouring Soap into Mold
Pouring Soap into Mold

Allow your soap to sit in the mold undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. I like to use cardboard boxes under my soap so I don’t damage my shelves. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. The best part is you can have them included in qualifying order for free! They are an awesome resource!

Taylor

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Starting with Soap – Day 11

Finished Neem Soap
Finished Neem Soap

One thing I have learned by cooking for others is that we each have our own tastes and preferences. Personal care products are much the same way. What I like will be different from what you like. Many factors include humidity, body chemistry, mineral content of water and so on. Ack! How does one know what to make? Unfortunately there is only one thing you can do. Test.

Weighing Fixed Oils
Weighing Fixed Oils

We can make it much easier for you by suggest oils that we consider amazing and worth the time and effort. One such oil is Neem Oil. Now, Neem does have a pungent odor that can seem a little overwhelming but the intensity of the scent diminishes once in soap. I am very fond of how it makes my skin feel. After scrubbing my hands and arms with one of these bars, one coworker commented on how baby soft my skin was. It was amazing!

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Neem Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
142 grams Coconut Oil
128 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
14 grams Neem Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
5 oz Coconut Oil
4.5 oz Olive Oil
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
0.5 oz Neem Oil
2.27 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
31.25% Coconut Oil
28.12% Olive Oil
37.50% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
3.12% Neem Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Weighing Neem Oil
Weighing Neem Oil

Now to make soap. Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water. Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. It is best to create good habits now than to try to break bad ones later.

Ready to make soap
Ready to make soap

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and set up my mold during this period. This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 100°F-110°F, add your lye solution to your oils. Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace. Just a fair warning, during the mixing phase, the scent of the Neem Oil seems to get more intense. Not to worry. This is only temporary.

Ready to mix soap
Ready to mix soap

Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk not cooked custard. That is pretty fluid!

Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Allow your soap to sit in the mold undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. I like to use cardboard boxes under my soap so I don’t damage my shelves. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. The best part is you can have them included in qualifying order for free! Isn’t that awesome?

Taylor

Mixed Soap
Mixed Soap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold
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Starting with Soap – Day 10

Finished Tamanu Oil Soap
Finished Tamanu Oil Soap

The next luxury oil that I wanted to feature is Tamanu Oil. Tamanu Oil is amazing to work with in lotions and creams. It has been used in many formulations designed to soothe and hydrate irritated skin. I am also partial to the butter pecan ice cream scent Tamanu Oil has. It has a phenomenal odor that is just scrumptious! If you haven’t tried Tamanu Oil, I highly recommend it.

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

In past experiments I have conducted, many naturally scented fixed oils loose their scent when converted into soap. Virgin Coconut Oil is one such oil. You can imagine my worry as I made this soap. While the butter pecan scent in not as intense as it is in the oil, it is still in the finished soap and I think it makes the soap smell wonderful and clean! Want to know the best part? No fragrance or essential oil required!

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Tamanu Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
113 grams Coconut Oil
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
28 grams Tamanu Oil
67 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
4 oz Coconut Oil
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
1 oz Tamanu Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
25% Coconut Oil
37.50% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
6.25% Tamanu Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

Now to make soap. Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water. Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. Safety first!

Waiting for materials to cool.
Waiting for materials to cool.

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and prepare my mold during this time.  (Some days I might even have time to make myself a cup of tea and listen to the radio.) This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 100°F-110°F, add your lye solution to your oils.  Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace. (Your mixture will morph from the beautiful green color to this alarming brown-orange color. This is normal. The color will return to a soft green in about 12 hours.)

Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk not cooked custard. That is pretty fluid!

Ready to pour into the mold
Ready to pour into the mold

Allow your soap to sit in the mold undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. I like to use cardboard boxes that I have cut up under my soap so I don’t damage my shelves. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. The best part is you can have them included in qualifying order for free! Let us know if you want a pack.

Taylor

Finished Soap in Mold
Finished Soap in Mold
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Starting with Soap – Day 9

Finished Beeswax Soap
Finished Beeswax Soap

Today I wanted to work with what can be a rather finicky material, Beeswax.  Why is Beeswax finicky? Well, it is extremely temperature sensitive and we recommend no more that 0.5 ounce per pound of fats. That is a tiny amount!

While Beeswax contributes this amazingly creamy sensation, it can do some strange things to your soap. A tiny amount can help you make a harder bar but the more Beeswax you add, the more spongy your soap becomes. Why? Beeswax is really high in unsaponifiable material. The more unsaponifiable material there is, the more it affect the texture. This is a great example of where less is more.

Weighing Coconut Oil
Weighing Coconut Oil

Beeswax can also be a bit of a lather killer. For this reason, I will be using both Palm Kernel Oil and Coconut Oil because I want lots of lather. Remember that Palm Kernel Oil and Coconut Oil can make a hard bar. To offset that, I will be using lots of Olive Oil. Let’s go make soap!

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Beeswax
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
113 grams Coconut Oil
184 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
14 grams Beeswax
67 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
4 oz Coconut Oil
6.5 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
0.5 oz Beeswax
2.35 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
25% Coconut Oil
40.62% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
3.12% Beeswax
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Weighing Oils
Weighing Oils

Now to make soap. Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water. Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. Safety first!

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and set up my mold during this period. This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 100°F-110°F, add your lye solution to your oils.

Heating Oils (Make sure your beeswax melts all the way!)
Heating Oils (Make sure your beeswax melts all the way!)

Remember that Beeswax is far better behaved when you use lower temperatures. You will also get a smoother texture if you use lower temperatures. One thing that is a little hard about making a Beeswax soap is that your oil mixture will get hazy and cloudy and it will STILL be too hot! There will be a little voice in your head screaming that you either need to make soap right now or reheat your oils. Ignore it. It will make you crazy and more antsy than being a teenager waiting for a date but do your best not to worry or pace while you wait. (It is super hard, I know. Guess who ended up walking laps around the building…)

Cooled Oils, Ready to make soap
Cooled Oils, Ready to make soap

Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace. Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk not cooked custard. That is pretty fluid!

Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Allow your soap to sit in the mold undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. I like to use cardboard boxes under my soap so I don’t damage my shelves. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. We can send some to you for free! (I like to tape them next to the recipe in my trusty notebook. It is super helpful!)

Taylor

Mixed Soap
Mixed Soap

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow! It get thick very fast!
Wow! It gets thick very fast!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beeswax soap in Mold
Beeswax soap in Mold
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Starting with Soap – Day 8

Finished Soap
Finished Soap

I have so much fun making soap and using different luxury oils. It can be quiet the addicting hobby! Which soaps have you made? Which one has been your favorite so far? I want to know!

It is really hard for me to choose favorites but so far I think I have enjoyed the lanolin soap (Day 6) and the soap with both Palm Kernel Oil and Coconut Oil (Day 5). Remember, it is still a little early to pass judgement just yet. We still have a few more luxury oils to go!

Weighed Oils
Weighed Oils

Today’s luxury oil is Emu Oil. There are many stories of how Emu Oil has aided dry skin. While I don’t know how valid those claims are, it certainly makes an excellent soap. Try this oil for yourself. I think it will surprise and delight you.

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Emu Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
29 grams Emu Oil
67 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
1 oz Emu Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut
6.25% Emu Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Making Lye Solution
Making Lye Solution

Now to make soap. Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. If your Emu Oil has been sitting for a while, I like to give it a good shake so I know the stearines are evenly distributed. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water.  Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. Safety first!

Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and set up my mold during this period. This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 110°F-130°F, add your lye solution to your oils. (Because Emu Oil is prone to fractionation, you will want to make sure everything has completely melted. Otherwise you have get white dots in your soap.) Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace.

Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk not cooked custard. That is pretty fluid!

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold

Allow your soap to sit in the mold undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. I like to use cardboard boxes under my soap so I don’t damage my shelves. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. The best part is you can have them included in qualifying order for free! Let us know if you want a pack.

Taylor

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Starting with Soap – Day 7

Finished Soap
Finished Sea Buckthorn and Avocado Soap

The magic of soapmaking never ceases to amaze me. As a soapmaker, I think I get to make some of the most fantastic items with some incredible oils from around the world. One thing that I find really keeps the wonder is how each luxury oil can have such a big influence on what the finished bar is like. Some are super emollient and luxurious, others produce crazy bubbles and yet others produce beautiful colors. Today I wanted to share how simple changes in your soap formulation can cause spectacular color to form. Best of all, it is done naturally!

Weighed Oils
Weighed Oils

Today’s luxury oil is our Sea Buckthorn Oil. Now because the color of Sea Buckthorn Oil is so vibrant and intense, I am not going to use an entire ounce. That would just be way too potent. It also allows us to add a second luxury oil because we will be using so little of the Sea Buckthorn Oil.

Mixing Lye Solution
Mixing Lye Solution

I decided on using Avocado Oil. Avocado Oil has a fair amount of unsaponifiable material in it, making it gentle and luxurious feeling. After making this soap, you will quickly see why Avocado is a favorite among formulators for baby products. It is that amazing. Just wow.

 

Ingredients
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Avocado Oil
Sea Buckthorn Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

 

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
26 grams Avocado Oil
3 grams Sea Buckthorn Oil
68 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
0.9 oz Avocado Oil
0.1 oz Sea Buckthorn Oil
2.38 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut Oil
5.62% Avocado Oil
0.62% Sea Buckthorn Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

 

Adding Lye Solution to Oils
Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Now to make soap. Weigh your oils into a microwave safe container. Remember that Sea Buckthorn Oil has a very intense color. While I have not had it color my skin permanently, I have found that it can take a little to clean up. This is where Windex® comes to the rescue. While the oils are heating in the microwave, weigh out your lye and mix with your water. Remember to add your lye to your water, not the other way around. Safety first!

Mixing Soap
Mixing Soap

Allow your two mixtures to cool. I like to put away my oils and set up my mold during this period. This helps keep my counters clean and my distractions to a minimum. When your oils are around 110°F, add your lye solution to your oils. (Remember to pour the lye solution into your oils slowly. We want to minimize any splashing both for the sake of safety and for clean up.) Using your immersion blender, mix your soap until you reach a light trace.

Pouring Soap into Mold
Pouring Soap into Mold

Remember, trace doesn’t denote a viscosity, it just means that we aren’t seeing the oils float to the top and separate out. Often we pour our soap into the mold when it is the viscosity of whole milk. That is pretty fluid! Take a break and fill a glass with some water. If any oil has risen to the surface during that time, you know it needs a little more mixing.

Soap in Mold
Soap in Mold

After pouring your soap into your mold, allow your soap to sit  undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then cut into bars and place out on a shelf where they can dry. You can use your soap immediately but it will last longer if you allow it to dry completely. A great aid in determining if your soap has fully dried are our Cure Cards. The best part is you can have them included in qualifying order for free! Just let us know you want a package and we will stick them in your next order.

Taylor

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