Category Archives: Soap

Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Emmett, Osmanthus, Cucumbers & Melons and Frosted Cupcake

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! While these tests are a good indicator of how these fragrances will behave, this does not eliminate the need for you to test each fragrance with your own particular formulas.

Emmett scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Emmett scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our first fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Emmett. According to our catalog, Emmett is a “very masculine scent of bay, rum, lime, mahogany, amber, vanilla and bergamot.” Emmett is a smooth and clean scent that makes me think of mountain air . This masculine combination of wood and citrus makes Elements of Bamboo bring peace, tranquility and balance to mind.

There was very slight discoloration of note, a light tan color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Osmanthus. According to our catalog, Osmanthus is “sensual, fresh, fruit and herbaceous and wonderfully calming. I think it is the best ever! It can be a personal signature scent so easily.” Osmanthus is a charming fragrance and is one of our most popular scents when we have personal projects that we need to find a scent that almost everybody will like. This fragrance is incredibly true to the fresh Osmanthus trees that I got to smell at the Summer Palace in Beijing!

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Osmanthus scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Osmanthus scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Cucumbers & Melons scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Cucumbers & Melons scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Cucumbers & Melons. According to our catalog, Cucumbers & Melons is “A perfect blend on melons and cucumber with incredible results in cold process soap!” I find Cucumbers & Melons to be … indescribably refreshing. I know the scent is a combination of melons with cucumbers, but this fragrance always makes me smile and feel like I can tackle my day head on!

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make a green and yellow swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Frosted Cupcakes. According to our catalog, Frosted Cupcakes is a “blend of sugar, cinnamon, caramel and pecans. Imagine a German chocolate cake (without the cake) in a graham cracker crust. That caramel scent seems like home-baked fun.” This fragrance is one of my favorites! I love using it in room sprays and salt potpourri because it makes the kitchen smell like I’ve been slaving away over dessert when in reality, it only took me a few minutes to pull something from the freezer and pop it in the oven!

There is a moderate amount of discoloration of note, a very nice shade of soft brown hues. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Frosted Cupcakes scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Frosted Cupcakes scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F.. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

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Soap & Sage Leaves: Cold Process Soap with an Oil Infusion

Sage is one of my favorite herbs. Now, I might be a little biased due to our name, but I love the scent of sun kissed sage in the afternoon. The warm, herbal scent is comforting to me. It doesn’t bring much of the way in food memories to mind, since I primarily grow the plant just for the looks rather than culinary uses.

As I can’t go anywhere without thinking what would be fun to use in soap, I decided to harvest some of the sage leaves and dry them for use in soap. I collected the leaves I wanted and then dried them on a cooling rack used for baking. It didn’t take much time for the sage leaves to dry in our arid Utah climate! After the sage had dried, I had a brown lunch bag filled with dried leaves.I decided to divide the amount into three groups so I could make three different soaps.

Join me today as I make my first batch of cold process soap with dried sage leaves and an oil infusion!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Dried Sage Leaves
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
7.1 grams dried sage leaves
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
0.25 oz dried sage leaves
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water
Q.S. Dried Sage Leaves

I began by weighing the oils into a microwave safe container. Then I placed into the microwave and gently heated. Once all the oils had been melted, I added the dry sage leaves to the oil. I let the leaves and oil sit for about 24 hours. When I came back the next day, the oil had solidified so I placed the container back in the microwave to melt the oil again.

While the oils were heating again, I weighed the lye. I slowly added the lye to a container of water I had measured out before melting the oils again. DO NOT add water to your container of lye.

Once the oil had been melted completely, I removed the sage leaves. The leaves were still relatively dry, despite sitting the oil for 24 hours. I suspect this is due to the fact that the oils had cooled and solidified. The weight of my oils changed by 0.08 of an ounce (2.27 grams), so I left my calculated lye amount as I had originally calculated. That being said, I won’t be doing that again! Next time, I will place my dried botanicals in a single oil (preferably liquid at room temperature) and then weigh out the needed amount of oil.

Once my lye solution and oils were within an ideal temperature range*, I slowly poured the lye solution into the oils. I used an immersion blender to mix the oils and lye solution together until I reached trace. After I achieved trace, I poured the soap into the mold and allowed the soap to sit undisturbed for 24 hours.

I came back after 24 hours and cut the soap into bars. Then I placed the cut bars of soap on a piece of cardboard and arranged them to allow for good air flow between bars. I placed the bars on my curing shelf and made a note of their starting weight. As the curing process is the time that allows for any excess water to evaporate, soap cures fairly quickly in our dry climate.

Soap Notes: As I was mixing the soap, it had a slight pinkish hue. That pinkish hue did disappear while the soap was going through the gel phase and the final bar had a nice creamy color.

*Temperature Note: For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. This particular batch had temperatures around 120°F.

I had so much fun making this soap! Stop by tomorrow and we’ll try another batch with sage leaves!

Andee

Our sage is blooming!
Our sage is blooming!
Dried sage leaves.
Dried sage leaves.
The dried sage leaves sitting in the soap oils.
The dried sage leaves sitting in the soap oils.
Melted oils after removing the sage.
Melted oils after removing the sage.
Adding the lye solution to the oils.
Adding the lye solution to the oils.
Mixing the oils and lye solution together.
Mixing the oils and lye solution together.

Soap after being poured into the mold.
Soap after being poured into the mold.
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Soapmakers: Thoughts on calculating water or using discounts

Clean WaterDear Soapmakers,

Recently I have become aware of some difficulties soap makers are having while trying to figure their water needs. Let me try to help clear the air (water?) here.

1) Water is needed in your soap making process. This is not an ingredient that needs to be weighed to 1/100th of an ounce accuracy. Any excess water will evaporate so only worry about non-variable ingredients when you spend time weighing.

2) Always base your water needs on the amount of fat and never the amount of lye. Recent comments to me indicate that some people are teaching to use an amount of water that is double the amount of the lye needed. Let’s cover two examples:
a batch of soap that is 16 ounces of oils, the lye calculation needs 3.68 ounces, water would then be 7.36 ounces
second batch of soap that is 16 ounces of oils, the lye calculation needs 1.55 ounces, water would then be 3.10 ounces.

For the first batch in this example 7.36 ounces of water is quite fluid yet still workable. It will take longer for the soap to cure because the extra water must evaporate. Trace may be slow to come because of the excess water.

The second batch has too little water, trace will happen very quickly, it will be difficult to color or scent because the soap progresses too fast. Both batches are the same size, 16 ounces of fat. The first batch will likely be 22 to 23 ounces of finished soap, the second batch will likely be 20 to 21 ounces of finished soap.

How to correctly calculate the amount of water needed for each batch:

Calculate the amount of fat you are using. Multiply this amount by 32 to 42%. If you live where: the air is so dry your sheets crunch when you crawl into bed, daily reports of how low the relative humidity is in your region appear on the evening news, without supplemented water your lawn will be brown for 11 months of the year then you know you need closer to the 42%. This is about to 6.75 fluid ounces per lb of fats. If you can’t remember when the last dry day happened, mold is a constant problem, moss grows on every roof top in your city, and everyone uses the term muggy or damp on a daily basis, or if you own and use a rain coat/slicker regularly – you should use closer to 32% which is about to 5 fl oz per lb of fats. You may have needs to use more or less water than these amounts but at least you are now calculating for your needs instead of aiming for moving, unreliable target.

Think I might have missed the mark? If so, then why do we use different amounts of scenting oils when we make peppermint soap vs vanilla soap? Different needs require different amounts. Use what you need, not what is excessive or too little.

Need help with your recipes? Just comment on this blog and I will help walk you through the math.

Cheers!
Tina

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Caffe Latte Cold Process Soap

Caffe Latte Soap
Caffe Latte Soap

Recently, we offered a beginners soap making class, we had a few students that never made soap before and some that had made a few batches but wanted to focus on the cold process soap-making techniques. During this class each participant had the opportunity to make several batches of soap and since we were in the blog kitchen we couldn’t help ourselves and started digging into the drawers and cupboards for new ideas. This beginners class soon covered some more advanced topics such as adding fragrances, additives, colors, essential oils, glitter, and espresso. Every batch we did we tried something new, we soon lost track of time made 20+ batches of soap and had gone through all the drawers and cupboards in the blog kitchen. So much fun!

In this blog I am going to share with you the Caffe Latte soap that we created in this class. This first started with everyone needing a beverage and as we traveled around the room for requests I asked Andee for a iced coffee (she makes the best). Well this got our ideas going and we asked Andee to make us some espresso for making – why not? a Caffe Latte soap! Swapping a portion of the water/lye mixture with espresso was a good start. Then we came up with coffee oil, coffee grounds, Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil. To do this we used two 1lb batches of soap, one we would be simulating the coffee portion and the other would be the cream portion.

While making the coffee portion we added the espresso into they lye mixture, this made the soap a really dark brown color. My favorite! We also added in some of the coffee oil this gave it a strong coffee scent. This will definitely wake you up, without the caffeine of course. The creamy top for our soap we added in a Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil and ground up coffee beans for sprinkling on the top.

Here are the ingredients and recipe.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Coffee Oil
Coffee Grounds
Espresso
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

We first poured the espresso added batch to fill the mold to the half way point, then poured the second creamy batch on top. Sprinkled with finely ground coffee beans to give that chocolate sprinkled effect. Wow, this soap smells wonderful! What a great fun idea and it sure wakes up your senses every time you use it.

Enjoy and see you soon in our next soap making class!

Tonya

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Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Juicy Grape, Gardenia, Snow Drops, Toasted Coconut, and Sandalwood Vanilla

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! This is a long series of blog posts that shows the testing of our fragrances in Cold Process Soap. We are testing ALL of the fragrances in our catalog at their maximum recommended usage rate for Cold Process Soap and showing you pictures of what the finished soaps look like in a side by side comparison with an unscented control batch. Since these fragrances are all being tested at their maximum recommended usage rate, I wouldn’t recommend using more fragrance. These soaps are strongly scented and will smell much stronger when wet.

Our first fragrance today in Cold Process Soap is Juicy Grape. Our catalog notes that “Juicy Grape is a wonderful fragrance with the intensely scented concord grape at the core. The fragrance is perfect for soaps, shampoos and conditioners. A real fresh and energizing scent.” Juicy Grape is one of my all time favorites, I love this fantastic scent in room sprays and lotions too. I have several friends that request this scent because it reminds them of a sweet candy grape treat.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that purple and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Juicy Grape fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.
Juicy Grape fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.

Gardenia scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Gardenia scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Gardenia. Under the description for Gardenia, our catalog says “Imagine white blooms on a warm summer night wafting fragrance through the air. That is Gardenia! A very rich fragrance” Reminds me of my grandma’s flower garden, she had these blooming every year. Brings back some great childhood memories.

There was a minute amount of discoloration, a light buttery yellow color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Snow Drops. According to our catalog, Snow Drops is a “Limited Edition! Snow Drops is a fresh and cool scent. Ozone meets with a slight sweetness, marine notes blend with a faint fresh evergreen. This is a great refreshing scent and reminds me of a crisp winter day in our high mountainous valley.” What? It can’t be, a limited edition? Better get yours now. I love this scent and so did several of you so it was brought back for a limited time. I recommend this scent it is a light and calming scent.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Snow Drops scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Snow Drops scented soap on the left and control on the right.

 


Toasted Coconut scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Toasted Coconut scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Toasted Coconut. According to our catalog, “Toasted Coconut – Need a fragrance that smells like sunshine and sun tans? Toasted coconut is it! Need a fragrance for warm bodies on the beach? Toasted Coconut is it! Toasted Coconut can be used in lotions, soaps and more. Coconut with caramel notes, paradise and vanilla. Yummy!” This scent is getting me in that summer time mood. Temperatures are rising and chaise lounge chairs with a side of lemonade is just what I’m dreaming for about now.

There is a significant amount of discoloration of note a lovely tan in color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.25%, which is 0.36 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fifth and last fragrance for today in Cold Process soap is Sandalwood Vanilla.  According to our catalog “Sandalwood Vanilla is “an incredibly masculine scent. Sandalwood and vanilla are the perfect mix. Warm, sexy, inviting and comforting are the words most often uses to describe this scent. Sandalwood, vanilla, oak, moss and crisp linen blend to make this sent the best.” Sandalwood is one of my favorite scents and what is better than sandalwood? Sandalwood combined with the sweet scent of vanilla. The best combination of scent and a fabulous scent for just about anything you want to make!

There is a significant amount of discoloration of note a very nice shade of soft brown hues. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Sandalwood Vanilla fragrance oil on the right and control on the right.
Sandalwood Vanilla fragrance oil on the right and control on the right.

Thank you for joining us today! We will be releasing more pictures as we continue testing soaps. If there is a fragrance you would like to see, let us know and we will put it at the top of our list!


Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

Tonya

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Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Blowing Bubbles, Honeysuckle, Bay Rum, Polynesian Red, and Apple Jack

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! This is a long series of blog posts that shows the testing of our fragrances in Cold Process Soap. We are testing ALL of the fragrances in our catalog at their maximum recommended usage rate for Cold Process Soap and showing you pictures of what the finished soaps look like in a side by side comparison with an unscented control batch. Since these fragrances are all being tested at their maximum recommended usage rate, I wouldn’t recommend using more fragrance. These soaps are strongly scented and will smell much stronger when wet.

Our first fragrance today in Cold Process Soap is Blowing Bubbles. Our catalog notes that Blowing Bubbles is “a fruity berry combination of strawberry, blackberry and wild huckleberries touched with a hint of pineapple and soft rose on a sweet caramel bottom. A great scent with mouthwatering berry notes which explode into the sweet realm of fun!” What a fun and playful name for a scent and this scent is definitely joyous and cheerful, very berry and bright!

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that pink and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 3.0%, which is 0.48 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Blowing Bubbles scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Blowing Bubbles scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Honeysuckle scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Honeysuckle scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Honeysuckle. Under the description for Honeysuckle, our catalog says “It is here! We know you have been asking for a good honeysuckle and have waited a long time. Well, the wait was worth it! A heavy floral that lingers for a long time, use alone or in blends. A fabulous anchoring aroma.” Now I know why hummingbirds are attracted to the flowers of the honeysuckle plant. It’s fantastic! An intense fragrance strong floral scent that is a perfect addition to our cold process soap.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that floral themed swirl you have always wanted without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Bay Rum. According to our catalog, Bay Rum “Well it is finally here! Bay Rum is the much requested fragrance for our R&D staff. After many trials and lots of fragrances we just didn’t like we created this one. One of our staff members too a bar of soap home to her husband. His complete comments we can’t print here but his animalistic growl said a thousand works!” A timeless sexy favorite, warm and exotic fragrance. Blends of citrus, spices and bay leaf give this a woody, sweet and spicy twist. A manly man fragrance.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Bay Rum scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Bay Rum scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Polynesian Red scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Polynesian Red scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Polynesian Red. According to our catalog, Polynesian Red is “Juicy pomegranates are the core of this fragrance. Hints of pineapple, red grapefruit, green apple, mango and subtle moss make this scent unforgettable. A staff favorite with lotions, soaps and especially hair care products. I like the Leave In Conditioner the most so my hair can have an aromatic uplift any time of day!” A fruity tropical and always a requested scent. Love, love, love this fragrance in everything I make.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make pink and orange swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fifth and last fragrance for today in Cold Process soap is Apple Jack. According to our catalog Apple Jack states that it’s “Another new arrival for the holiday. A festive combination of McIntosh red apples, juicy oranges and Madagascar vanilla perfectly complimented with our own special blend of spices. This one has ’tis the season’ written all over it.” Believe it or not, but I have not had the opportunity to try this scent before and I’m absolutely loving it. A great holiday treat, I am really enjoying the combination of apples and spice. I think I will make a room spray and see if the kids will come out of their rooms to see if I’m cooking. Haha!

There was a minute amount of discoloration, a light buttery yellow color. Still very minimal discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2%, which is 0.36 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Apple Jack scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Apple Jack scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Thank you for joining us today! We will be releasing more pictures as we continue testing soaps. If there is a fragrance you would like to see, let us know and we will put it at the top of our list!


Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

Tonya

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Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Tahitian Flowers, Wicked, Sahara Sandalwood, Sap Moss & Peach

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! This is a long series of blog posts that shows the testing of our fragrances in Cold Process Soap. We are testing ALL of the fragrances in our catalog at their maximum recommended usage rate for Cold Process Soap and showing you pictures of what the finished soaps look like in a side by side comparison with an unscented control batch. Since these fragrances are all being tested at their maximum recommended usage rate, I wouldn’t recommend using more fragrance. These soaps are strongly scented and will smell much stronger when wet.

Our first fragrance today in Cold Process Soap is Tahitian Flowers. Our catalog notes that it’s “Back by popular demand!! Have you ever heard of the special gardenia flowers that grow in Tahiti? Does Monoi de Tahiti sound familiar? Well, we have worked to make a fragrance suitable for soaps and cosmetics that smells just like these beautiful flowers. A tropical paradise of Tahitian gardenia, a fresh twist of tropical fruit all into one sensual fragrance. Works fabulously in soaps and the staff loved the scent in the lotions and creams. Do not think this smells like a domestic gardenia, it does not! This monoi de Tahiti smells tropical and island like.” What a nice soothing floral scent that will have you coming back for more.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that yellow and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Tahitian Flowers scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Tahitian Flowers scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Wicked scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Wicked scented soap on the left and control on the right.

 

Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Wicked. Under the description for Wicked, our catalog says “So, what fragrance could appeal to your inner Good Witch as well as your inner Bad Witch? Wicked, of course! This fragrance combines musky notes of patchouly, vanilla, and woods with kisses of sweet citrus and plums. Was that a hint of pure white lily? Or was it the tip of the iceberg of sensual vanilla? Only you can decide if this scent should be worn by day to release your inner Good Witch, or by night to release your inner Bad Witch. This one-of-a-kind scent is sure to please all witches and warlocks!”

This fancy and fun fragrance will not disappoint. There was a moderate amount of discoloration, a medium brown hazelnut color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Sahara Sandalwood. According to our catalog, Sahara Sandalwood is “A soft, masculine sandalwood with notes of vanilla and coconut. Warm sensual, perfectly masculine and certainly a winner for soaps and lotions. Some staff members said the scent reminds them of sandy beaches, mostly naked men, warm sunshine and suntan lotions. Does this mean we are ready for summer?!?!” I believe we are all ready for summer and this scent definitely puts us there.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Sahara Sandalwood scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Sahara Sandalwood scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Sap Moss scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Sap Moss scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Sap Moss. According to our catalog, “Aveda has done it again! Sap Moss products from Aveda are blended with Iceland moss, quillaja, yucca, olibanum and galbanum. A soothing fragrance with a fresh appeal. Don’t be surprised if you are ready to make linen sprays, shampoos, conditioners, soaps, cuticle oils, foot creams with this marine-green blend.” There is nothing on Earth like it! The smell is fabulous, light and calming.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fifth and last fragrance for today in Cold Process soap is Peach. Peach according to our catalog states that “I love biting into a fresh peach and having the sweet juices envelope my senses. It is one of the things I look forward to each fall. This peach fragrance is so good it brings back all those wonderful memories. It is sweet and tangy, complex and very refreshing.” We wish peach season was year-round here. Peaches are a great treat to eat or to add to your iced tea. What a lovely treat to add this fantastic scent to your soaps and other products so you can enjoy this fragrance year-round.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that orange and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.25%, which is 0.36 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Peach scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Peach scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Thank you for joining us today! We will be releasing more pictures as we continue testing soaps. If there is a fragrance you would like to see, let us know and we will put it at the top of our list!


Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

Tonya

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Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Angel, Pink Chiffon, Enchanted Apple, Apricot Freesia & White Sage

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! This is a long series of blog posts that shows the testing of our fragrances in Cold Process Soap. We are testing ALL of the fragrances in our catalog at their maximum recommended usage rate for Cold Process Soap and showing you pictures of what the finished soaps look like in a side by side comparison with an unscented control batch. Since these fragrances are all being tested at their maximum recommended usage rate, I wouldn’t recommend using more fragrance. These soaps are strongly scented and will smell much stronger when wet.

Our first fragrance today in Cold Process Soap is Angel type. Angel type is stated in our catalog that “It is a pathetic sight to see the staff stack up at the door to our research team and grovel! They begged for this fragrance prior to us ever testing it. They said “I could just bathe in Angel, please get it!” Well, now the fragrance has been approved and ready for sale. Of course the best thing about our version of Angel by Thierry Mugler is you can make soaps, lotions and whatever else you want. Even bubble bath, so you can literally bathe in it! Enjoy! Please note: This fragrance is not manufactured or distributed by Thierry Mugler Parfums S.A.S., owner of the registered trademark Angel.” An intriguing fragrance that is perfect for your upcoming day on the town event.

There was minimal discoloration of note, a light tan color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Angel scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Angel scented soap on the left and control on the right.

 


Pink Chiffon scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Pink Chiffon scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Pink Chiffon. Under the description for Pink Chiffon, our catalog says “Oh! Fragrances like this are some of my favorite. Fresh lilies, soft jasmine, apples, red pear, white peach, with musk and powdery amber. Yum! Join us for a new scent that is beautiful to use and beautiful to wear!” This is very feminine, with a bit of powder and musk. Not overwhelming girlish, a soft floral and a favorite among all the girls in my home.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that spring themed swirl you have always wanted without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Enchanted Apple. The catalog description for Enchanted Apple states, “In our search for a new apple scent we were excited by the test results of this fragrance. The clean apple top notes make for a delicious treat. Apple opens the way for green, juicy pear notes and jasmine overtones and a lightly musk note. Fabulous in cold process soap! Bountiful and fruity with the obvious notes being green apple.” A great combination of fruity, sweet and floral. It like being in a secret garden full of sweet apples. Already picked, freshly cut and ready to enjoy. All I need is a pie crust and I’ll be in paradise.

There was minimal discoloration of note, a very creamy light tan color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Enchanted Apple scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Enchanted Apple scented soap on the left and control on the right.

 


Apricot Freesia scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Apricot Freesia scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Apricot Freesia. According to our catalog, “Apricot Freesia, this is the freshest spring fruity fragrance ever! Apricots are multidimensional and we add to this the spicy floral of freesia. It is so amazing we think it will knock your socks off! This has been a staff favorite for lotions and hair care. There is nothing like an Apricot Freesia shampoo and conditioner hair-do followed up by periodic doses of body lotion. Yumm!” An upbeat fruity and floral blend. Not overwhelmingly sweet just a perfect balance that you will love.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that spring themed swirl you have always wanted without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fifth and last fragrance for today in Cold Process soap is White Sage. White Sage according to our catalog states that “We have had many requests for a sage scent. Clean, fresh, nice and light are the words used most to describe this scent during our testing. A must to order!” What a great way to enjoy this fragrance in your CP soaps. The best of both worlds; great soap and you also get to cleanse away all the bad mojo.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that green and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

White Sage scented soap on the left and control on the right.
White Sage scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Thank you for joining us today! We will be releasing more pictures as we continue testing soaps. If there is a fragrance you would like to see, let us know and we will put it at the top of our list!


Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

Tonya

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Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Lavender Flowers, Amber Romance, Relaxation, Juniper Breeze, & Lavender Fleur

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! This is a long series of blog posts that shows the testing of our fragrances in Cold Process Soap. We are testing ALL of the fragrances in our catalog at their maximum recommended usage rate for Cold Process Soap and showing you pictures of what the finished soaps look like in a side by side comparison with an unscented control batch. Since these fragrances are all being tested at their maximum recommended usage rate, I wouldn’t recommend using more fragrance. These soaps are strongly scented and will smell much stronger when wet.

Our first fragrance today in Cold Process Soap is Lavender Flowers. Our catalog notes that “Lavender essential oil can be rather overpowering and almost medicinal in smell. This fragrance oil is not. It has the beautiful, spring fresh scent of lavender without excess. It is a very popular women’s fragrance.” Lavender always puts me in a good mood. This scent is one that I look forward to when walking through my flower gardens. This fragrance is also fabulous in linen sprays.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that purple and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Lavender Flower scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Lavender Flower scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Amber Romance scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Amber Romance scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Amber Romance. Under the description for Amber Romance our catalog states, “Yet another in the Victoria’s Secret lineup. This rendition has rich amber notes, complimented by fruity top notes of irresistible black currant, plums and juicy pineapple. This fragrance will discolor cold process soap to a marvelous amber. We loved it, very unique! Please note: This fragrance is not manufactured or distributed by Intimate Beauty Corporation (DBA Victoria’s Secret), owner of the registered trademark Amber Romance.” A warm, deep and seductive blend of fruity, sweet and musky fragrance. A great scent to add to your own body sprays and lotions.

There was moderate discoloration of note and this means you get a fabulous milk chocolate hues. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Relaxation. According to our catalog, “If there is any way our R&D staff could put together a relaxing fragrance, this is it. A soft fragrance with a hint of carnation spiciness, transparent musk are surrounded by white lilies, hyacinth, jasmine, tuberose and vanilla with a touch of lemon. A gentle scent that would be fabulous in lotions, creams, soaps and room or linen sprays. The art of true relaxation should be learned by all. With this scent, you are one step closer. Enjoy!” A clean and fresh scent, definitely relaxing and enjoyable. A great way to add some extra relaxation into your life.

There was minimal discoloration of note, a creamy pale barely-there yellowed parchment tan color. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.75%, which is 0.44 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Relaxation scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Relaxation scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Juniper Breeze scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Juniper Breeze scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Juniper Breeze. According to our catalog,”Juniper Breeze is a Bath and Body Works scent. This is a duplication of their scent. This much requested duplication is very true to the real thing, but our version holds in soap, has staying power, and is suitable for all other cosmetic applications like powder, lotion, shampoo and conditioners. Now you have an improvement of the original with a stronger scent (not related to the just use more oil to get a stronger scent idea of fragrance usage). We wanted you to have the best! Please note: This fragrance is not manufactured or distributed by Bath & Body Works, Inc., owner of the registered trademark Juniper Breeze. Invigorating, fresh evergreen scent of juniper. It is fresh, natural and light a great all time fragrance.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fifth and last fragrance for today in Cold Process soap is Lavender Fleur. Lavender Fleur type according to our catalog states that “Lavender Fleur type is “A fun lavender fragrance similar to Victoria’s Secret. This isn’t a purely herbal scent like lavender essential oil. Lavender Fleur is a fruity and floral lavender. Even our lavender haters (oh! did I just say that?) enjoyed this scent enough to make positive comments. Start with lavender then add green cucumber, a twist of orange and a wave of white lily. I know it sounds like a menagerie in a bottle but when the fragrance is this good people really comment.” Soothing and refreshing, what a great way to relax. This lavender fragrance sure has won me over to enjoy this wonderful purple flower.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that purple and white swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Lavender Fleur scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Lavender Fleur scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Thank you for joining us today! We will be releasing more pictures as we continue testing soaps. If there is a fragrance you would like to see, let us know and we will put it at the top of our list!


Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

Tonya

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Fragrance Testing in Cold Process Soap: Pixie Dust, Awapuhi Seaberry, Moonlight Path, Pluot, and Coconut Lime Verbena

I have more photos for our Fragrance Testing Series! This is a long series of blog posts that shows the testing of our fragrances in Cold Process Soap. We are testing ALL of the fragrances in our catalog at their maximum recommended usage rate for Cold Process Soap and showing you pictures of what the finished soaps look like in a side by side comparison with an unscented control batch. Since these fragrances are all being tested at their maximum recommended usage rate, I wouldn’t recommend using more fragrance. These soaps are strongly scented and will smell much stronger when wet.

Our first fragrance today in Cold Process Soap is Pixie Dust. Our catalog notes that “I thought our R&D staff had lost their minds when this fragrance was presented as a new product. I couldn’t imagine what Pixie Dust would smell like! Would it smell like clothes or toes? Or hair or fresh bathed skin? You would think should I know better by now. Our R&D staff is awesome with their testing of new fragrances, and this scent is no different. Now that I have smelled this scent, here is what it smells like: Pixie Dust is a fresh, clean scent with hints of aloe, greens and a subtle citrus twist. I smell it and think spring. When samples of this fragrance started arriving to our customers in their orders the phone calls said plenty! I didn’t even know our shipping department had samples already! With spring right around the corner you can’t go wrong with Pixie Dust in soaps, lotions and everything in between. My personal favorite is shampoo. MMMMM!”

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that spring themed swirl you have always wanted without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Pixie Dust fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.
Pixie Dust fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.

Awapuhi Seaberry scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Awapuhi Seaberry scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Our second fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Awapuhi Seaberry. Under the description for Awapuhi Seaberry, our catalog says “Awapuhi is Hawaiian for “White Ginger.” Imagine a fresh ocean breeze with a whisper of floral accompanied with a perfectly mastered blend of melons and berries. This is truly an island sensation. When we are asked what fragrance to use that is clean, fresh, universal for soaps, lotions and the whole product line, this is one of the first fragrances we turn to. This fragrance is a good cornerstone for building a whole fragrance line.” I’m feeling like booking a Hawaiian vacation. What great timing!

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that Hawaiian themed swirl you have always wanted without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our third fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Moonlight Path. According to our catalog, Moonlight Path is “A Bath & Body Works favorite. Our version of BBW Moonlight Path has lavender, rose, violet and musk. Yet, our rendition of this sensual floral is safe for cold process soap, wax candles and more! When we tested this fragrance we were totally unprepared for the staff reaction. We expected that the female side of the staff would oohhh and aaahhhh over the floral/sensual scent but when we gave it to the men we were just shocked! One guy in particular just gushed over the fragrance. We were worried we needed to send him home to collect himself! And I can tell you all the women took note of this reaction!!” A soft, peaceful and relaxing fragrance. Something about this fragrance will make you want to cuddle up and snuggle.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.5%, which is 0.4 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Moonlight Path scented soap on the left and control on the right.
Moonlight Path scented soap on the left and control on the right.

Pluot fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.
Pluot fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.
Our fourth fragrance in Cold Process Soap is Pluot. According to our catalog, Pluot “Is it a plum or is it an apricot? A pluot is both! I love these fruits. Have you seen them in your local market? It is almost apricot time here in Northern Utah, and we are drooling for the new fruits to be ready. We have had so much rain this spring, we weren’t sure if the garden would float away or all of our fruits would be super sized. Sweet notes of plum and apricot have a twist of citrus, rich vanilla, sensual sandalwood and the perfect sweetness of a fresh fruit dessert. I am sure you will love this scent as much as our staff has.” This Pluot fragrance has become one of my favorites, the sweet fruity plum and sweetness is a definite winning combination. It’s great in CP soaps, lotions and scrubs.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make any swirl without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.75%, which is 0.44 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.


Our fifth and last fragrance for today in Cold Process soap is Coconut Lime Verbena. Coconut Lime Verbena according to our catalog states that it’s “A creamy blend of coconut, tangy lime with hints of verbena, vanilla and musk. You have your favorite soaps, shampoos and other body products so now you can have a popular scent in your favorite formulations! Coconut is one of the most requested fragrances! We have found that coconut can be combined with almost anything! Enjoy!” It’s coconuty, limey, and then changes to a sweet musky scent that is exotic and tropical. Fresh breeze and fun fragrance to try.

There was not any discoloration of note and this means you can make that tropical themed swirl you have always been dreaming of without worrying about the fragrance causing discoloration. We used the maximum suggested usage rate of 2.75%, which is 0.44 ounces of fragrance in our 1 pound test batch.

Coconut Lime Verbena fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.
Coconut Lime Verbena fragrance oil on the left and control on the right.

Thank you for joining us today! We will be releasing more pictures as we continue testing soaps. If there is a fragrance you would like to see, let us know and we will put it at the top of our list!


Here are the details about our test batches before we added any fragrances!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Immersion Blender
Soap Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Our temperatures for lye and oils are between 125°F and 130°F to handle our currently cool weather. We make our soap with a 6% superfat. All of the batches we make are mixed to light trace and then the fragrance is added. After the fragrance is added we mix until the fragrance is incorporated and then we pour into the mold.

Tonya

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Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)