Category Archives: Color

Wahoo! The Yellow Lip Balm Color is back in stock!

I am so thrilled to announce that the Yellow Lip Balm Color is back in stock! I have been dying to make a few projects using this color and haven’t been able to get any. I know I haven’t been the only one trying to get some. Well, it is back and waiting for you to put it to work.If you haven’t used this fabulous color before, here are a few projects you can do using this fun product!

Plumberry Spice Celebration Soap
This fabulous soap uses Melt and Pour Soap Base, color and glitter. It is beautiful and simple enough project, you can do it with the kids!

Lemon Poppy Seed Soap
I love lemon poppy seed cookies. They taste so darn good and are wonderful all year long. In summer, in winter, with hot cocoa, coffee or even iced tea. This Cold Process soap was inspired by these fabulous cookies. We even posted the recipe for the cookies! Yummy!

Coffee & Cream Lip Gloss
If you are looking for a scrumptious lip gloss recipe, look no further! This recipe tastes just like a sweet, creamy latte. We even added a little shimmer to this gloss, but remember, shimmer is optional. Just like the whipped cream on top of your morning coffee, you can have it with or without. You have all the power!

Testing Colors – Part 3
Have you ever wondered what it would look like if you added one of the oil soluble colors to cold process or melt & pour soap? Well wonder no longer. We have already done the testing! I highly recommend using the Yellow Lip Balm color is you are looking for bold and stunning yellows. No dingy yellow here!

Honey Flavored a la Lip Crème
Fresh honey right out of the sun warmed jar tastes so good. I grew up trailing my father through the field checking on our beehives and sneaking a bite every time we harvested honey. This delicious lip balm reminds me of those days and that wonderful flavor. If you have ever gotten honey from a local beekeeper, this is the recipe to try. You will love it!

 

 

Taylor

Melt & Pour on the left and Cold Process on the right.
Testing Colors – Part 3
Finished lip gloss.
Coffee & Cream Lip Gloss
Finished Cookies with a Cup of Vanilla Tea
Lemon Poppy Seed Cookies with a Cup of Vanilla Tea

Honey Flavored a la Lip Creme
Honey Flavored a la Lip Creme
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Day-Glo Colors Samples

We are sending out some of our new Day-Glo colors samples in orders placed at thesage.com. If there is a specific color that you would like to try put a note in the comments section of your next order and we will send it along with your order.

Blaze Orange Day-Glo – What a brilliant orange this color is ready for fantastic colored soaps! I was amazed by the colors Andee created in her music inspired soap series on our blog. If you like orange, then you will love this bright and cheerful orange color!

Corona Magenta Day-Glo – WOW! Talk about poke-eye brilliant! This is a great color for bright soaps and lip balms. We sure had fun with this soap. Andee made a music inspired soap series on our blog and it is PERFECT for this color.

Aurora Pink Day-Glo – This bubble gum pink can do the whole range of pale pink to Wowza Pink! Super fun and even suitable for lip colors. We know you will love using this color in your lip balms, soaps and other body care products. Check out Andee’s music inspired soap series on our blog to see this bubbly pink color.

Fire Orange Day-Glo – This is Fire Orange and ready for fireworks! Holy Cow! This color is brilliant and just fun. This color is suitable for all soaps and makes a perfect match for citrus types. Check out Andee’s music inspired soap series on our blog to see this fiery orange color.

Enjoy your samples and I hope you have fun making great products with these colors.

Tonya

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Magic Super Bath Crystals

Do you remember the Bubble Bath Bomb we made a few weeks ago? I loved that. I made my own batch at home and boy did I have a great time watching that go off in the bath tub. However, I wanted more bubbles than what I was getting. So… this week we are making a super bath bomb! I will also be adding some dry color to it so it will magically turn color when it hits the water! Come join me to make this super bath crystals!

Do you find bath bombs and bubbles as fun as I do? What fragrances would you use instead? Would you use color or skip it all together? What would you do?

Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients
Baking Soda
Citric Acid
Cornstarch
Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
Sahara Sandalwood Fragrance Oil
Lemon Yellow Color
Equipment
Bowl
Scale
Spoon
Pipette
Containers for packaging

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
24 oz Baking Soda
12 oz Citric Acid
4 oz Cornstarch
1 oz Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
20 drops Sahara Sandalwood Fragrance Oil
0.15 cc scoop Lemon Yellow Color
Recipe in Grams
340 g Baking Soda
170 g Citric Acid
56 g Cornstarch
28 g Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
20 drops Sahara Sandalwood Fragrance Oil
0.15 cc scoop Lemon Yellow Color
Recipe in Percentages
59% Baking Soda
29% Citric Acid
10% Cornstarch
2% Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
Q.S. Sahara Sandalwood Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Lemon Yellow Color

Weigh all of the dry ingredients into a mixing container. Add the Sahara Sandalwood Fragrance Oil. Mix together well. If you are having trouble with it becoming airborne, you can mix it in a bag. This reduces the airborne factor while allowing you to see when it is entirely mixed. Once you have the bubble bath bomb mixed, you can spoon into jars, small bags or even bath salt tubes. At this point you can use, sell or give away. Enjoy your bubble bath crystals!

Taylor

 

Finished Bubble Bath Bomb
Weighing Dry Ingredients
Weighing Dry Ingredients
Weighing Dry Ingredients

Adding Color and Fragrance Oil
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Mulling Pigments

Back in May, nordagirl asked a question on the Starting With Color post. “Is there any reason you couldn’t use this same process with the dropper bottles to mix oxides or ultramarines with glycerine? If it makes any difference, I’m making CP soap only at this point.”

Unfortunately, glycerin is so thick and these pigments won’t fit through the hole of the dropper bottle. You can mull your pigments and create a thick paste to color your Cold Process Soap instead.

Now before you look at me like I’m crazy and wonder what mulling is, I’ll explain it. Mulling is when you mix a pigment to pulverize the clumps of pigment in preparing a paste for painting or coloring soap.

Collect needed supplies:
Glass mortar and pestle or a flat pane of glass and a flat bottom drinking glass
Glycerin
Pigment Color of your choice (I used Lavender Fields Color)
Rubber Scraper

There are two methods to use with mulling a pigment. I have taken photos of the first method.

#1 Pour a small amount of glycerin into the mortar. Use the pestle to coat the sides of the mortar with glycerin. Once the sides of the mortar have been coated, add 1 teaspoon of dry color into the mortar. Start mixing the color into the glycerin until you have created a tacky color paste.

#2 Scoop 1 teaspoon of dry color into the mortar. Use the pestle to make a small well in the mound of pigment. Pour a few drops of glycerin into the well. Start mixing the glycerin into the pigment and continue mixing until you either need more glycerin or you have created a tacky color paste.

Both methods will help prevent surprise clumps of color in your products, as well as allow you to store the paste in a small jar until you are ready to use the color. Yippee!

Isn’t that so easy?

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

Pouring some glycerin into the mortar.
Pouring some glycerin into the mortar.

Adding the pigment.
Adding the pigment.
Using the pestle to start mixing.
Using the pestle to start mixing.

There still are lots of pigment clumps.
There still are lots of pigment clumps.

Continue reading

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Testing Colors, Part 3

Melt & Pour on the left and Cold Process on the right.
Melt & Pour on the left and Cold Process on the right.

Today, I’m going to show you the Yellow Lip Balm Color in Melt & Pour Soap and Cold Process Soap.

Melt & Pour Soap Notes:
I melted some Transparent Melt & Pour soap in a large glass beaker and then added about 8 drops from the Professional size of the Yellow Lip Balm Color to the melted soap. Again, I used an immersion blender at the very beginning of the test. The color never changed and remained looking like a pitcher of orange juice.

Cold Process Soap Notes:
Yellow:
I added 8 drops of the Yellow Lip Balm Color to the oils once they were melted and used an immersion blender to make sure there were no particles of color floating in the oils. At this point, the oils were a yellow orange color, like orange juice, and then I added the lye mixture and used the immersion blender to mix. The color didn’t change at all as I blended the soap or even after I poured it into the mold. Once I cut the soap, I noticed that the soap was a smooth bright yellow color.

8 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 ounces weight Coconut Oil
4 ounces weight Olive Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fluid ounces cool water

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Adding color to melted oils: 1 minute
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

Andee

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Testing Colors, Part 2

Melt & Pour on the left and Cold Process on the right.
Melt & Pour on the left and Cold Process on the right.
Yesterday, I showed you the Blue Lip Balm Color in Cold Process Soap and Melt & Pour Soap. I thought that I would continue the color testing of the Oil Soluble Lip Balm Colors until all of the colors have been tested. Today, I’m going to show you the Coral Lip Balm Color in Melt & Pour Soap and Cold Process Soap.

Melt & Pour Soap Notes:
I melted some Transparent Melt & Pour soap in a large glass beaker and then added some of the Coral Lip Balm Color to the melted soap. Again, I used an immersion blender at the very beginning of the test. I was hoping that the color would stay in the same range that it started in. The color didn’t change much in the Melt & Pour Soap and I was very excited.

Cold Process Soap Notes:
I added the Coral Lip Balm Color to the oils once they were melted and used an immersion blender to make sure there were no particles of color floating in the oils. At this point, the oils were a warm coral orange color, and then I added the lye mixture and used the immersion blender to mix. The color didn’t change much as I blended the soap, but after I poured it into the mold, it turned a pretty pink color. Once I cut the soap, I noticed that the soap changed colors to a warm orange.

8 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 ounces weight Coconut Oil
4 ounces weight Olive Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fluid ounces cool water

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Adding color to melted oils: 1 minute
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

The pictures don’t give these soaps justice.

Andee

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Testing Colors

Cold Process Soap on the left and Melt & Pour Soap on the right.
Cold Process Soap on the left and Melt & Pour Soap on the right.
Last week, I showed my tests of the Ruby Lip Balm Color in Melt & Pour Soap as well as Cold Process Soap. After my test was over, I started to wonder what using some of the other colors would turn out to look like. Today, I’ll show you how the tests with the Blue Lip Balm Color turned out.

Melt & Pour Soap Notes:
I melted some Transparent Melt & Pour soap in a large glass beaker and then added some of the Blue Lip Balm Color to the melted soap. Considering my test with the Ruby Lip Balm Color and that it didn’t blend unless I used an immersion blender, I used an immersion blender at the very beginning of the test. I was extremely excited to discover the soap remained a bright vibrant blue.

Cold Process Soap Notes:
I added the Blue Lip Balm Color to the oils once they were melted and used an immersion blender to make sure there were no particles of color floating in the oils. At this point, the oils were a dark blue color, and then I added the lye mixture and used the immersion blender to mix. At first, the color started to turn a green color and then it changed to a murky brown color. The soap stayed at that murky brown color for a short time and I was so sad, but as soon as I had come to terms with the soap being brown, it changed color again to a burnt orange! The soap stayed at the burnt orange color until the soap had hit trace. I poured it into the mold and then allowed the soap to rest for 24 hours. Imagine my surprise when I came back after 24 hours to discover that the soap had turned a lovely purple! Wouldn’t you agree?

8 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 ounces weight Coconut Oil
4 ounces weight Olive Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fluid ounces cool water

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Adding color to melted oils: 1 minute
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

Andee

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Searching for a Red Color

In my quest to find a red color for Melt & Pour and cold process soap, I thought I would test the Lip Balm Colors, Oil Soluble to see if the Ruby Lip Balm Color would work. Imagine my surprise when both types of soap turned a vibrant orange color.

Melt & Pour Soap Notes:
I melted some Transparent Melt & Pour soap in a large glass beaker and then added some of the Ruby Lip Balm Color to the melted soap. When I first started stirring, the soap had a beautiful ruby color and I was so excited. Then I realized there were still particles of colorant floating around in the soap. I couldn’t get the particles to mix in by hand, so I grabbed the test kitchen immersion blender to see if I could blend in the color particles. Once I started blending, the soap turned orange! I was so shocked, I almost knocked the beaker off the counter!

Melt & Pour Soap on the left and Cold Process Soap on the right.
Melt & Pour Soap on the left and Cold Process Soap on the right.

Cold Process Soap Notes:
I added the Ruby Lip Balm Color to the oils once they were melted and used an immersion blender to make sure there were no particles of color floating in the oils. At this point, the oils were a rich ruby color, and then I added the lye mixture and used the immersion blender to mix. Wow! It turned a bright orange color so quickly, I couldn’t even say “lip balm.” Once the raw soap had hit trace, I poured it into the mold and then allowed the soap to rest for 24 hours. When I cut the soap, it was still a vibrant orange.

8 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 ounces weight Coconut Oil
4 ounces weight Olive Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fluid ounces cool water

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Adding color to melted oils: 1 minute
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

Andee

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