Author Archive

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 8

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014
Another day, another soap. How exciting! Before we get too far into the Blog Kitchen, I want to ask, “what recipe has been your favorite so far?” I think the one I have liked the most has been the one containing lanolin but todays soap just might beat it. Come find out why! 

For today’s soap, our luxury oil will be Meadowfoam! This wonderful oil contributes to the emoliency of the final soap. We know what that means. Happier skin! It will also contribute a warmer toned color to the soap. You will not get a natural white bar when working with Meadowfoam Oil.

Now some of you may be wondering why I chose such an expensive oil to be in a wash off product. At that price, it is clearly cost effective to put it in other products such as lip balms, lotions and creams, right? Yes, but before you dismiss Meadowfoam, I ask that you give it a chance.

While putting Meadowfoam into every single soap may be cost prohibitive, it does make a great, silky bar. How silky do you ask? So silky, and creamy that my garden roughened hands sighed with pleasure when I washed my hands with this soap. I would reserve bars with Meadowfoam for people whose skin needs a little extra love and care.

For my 6-5-4 oils, I used my standard Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Coconut Oil and Olive Oil. Do you just love the 6-5-4-1 formula? It is so simple. I love that I don’t have to worry about complicated formulas or rules. We just keep it simple.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Meadowfoam Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Meadowfoam Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Meadowfoam Oil
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Meadow Foam Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!

 

 

Taylor

Cut Soap

Cut Soap

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Mixing Oils and Lye Solution

Mixing Oils and Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 7

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014
Wahoo! We made it to Tuesday. Whew! Do you have anything exciting planned? I do! Today we are going to be making a soap with lanolin. Come join us today to find out why soaps containing lanolin have such a loyal following. 

So, where does lanolin come from? Every spring sheep are sheared for their wool. We take the wool to keep us warm in the winter AND to keep the sheep cool in the summer. During the washing process, lanolin is removed from the wool. It is then cleaned again to give us a wonderful product that can be added to our soap, lotions, creams and lip balms.

Lanolin has a high content of waxy esters that don’t saponify. This is why soaps with extremely high lanolin content stay very soft. However those waxy esters are what give the soap its emollient properties. Adding lanolin to your soap formulation also makes it temperature sensitive. Watch your temperatures when making a soap containing lanolin!

I have heard many people comment on how wonderful lanolin soap are. One of the best descriptions of lanolin soap I have heard is that after washing with the soap, it feels like a light lotion has already been applied to the skin. Spinners, knitters, secretaries and computer geeks all enjoy lanolin soaps. (Just call and ask Dirk, our resident IT guy.) I suspect a lanolin soap would be a welcome gift to someone who washes their hands frequently and their hands become dry and cracked.

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Lanolin
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Lanolin
63 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Lanolin
2.21 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Lanolin
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size. For this batch, my temperatures were 110 for my lye solution and 120 for my oils.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Ready to Remove Soap from Mold

Ready to Remove Soap from Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Preparing to Mix

Preparing to Mix

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 6

Monday, March 10th, 2014
We have made a few batches of soap already. Has anyone cut their soap yet? I want to hear how your soaps look, smell and feel!

 

Today we are going to use Tamanu Oil as our luxury oil. Tamanu Oil is used for the same reason Emu Oil is. It adds great emollient  properties, making a soap feel more conditioning and luxurious. It has a little less emollients than Emu Oil but adds a beautiful color and faint nutty odor that is very enjoyable.

If you are to use Tamanu Oil in your soaps with a fragrance, I would recommend more earthy, musky or nutty scents. Florals would not be a good mix.

I used Coconut Oil for lots of good lather and Hydrogenated Soybean Oil to help lighten the color from the Tamanu Oil. I personally prefer lighter colored bars of soap.

 

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Tamanu Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Tamanu Oil
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Tamanu Oil
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Tamanu Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this batch my temperature were 128°F for my oils and 114°F for my lye solution.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Preparing to Remove Soap from Mold

Preparing to Remove Soap from Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Preparing to Mix

Preparing to Mix

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Spring is Here Challenge Soap Submission – Belinda

Saturday, March 8th, 2014
Has anyone started any seeds yet? I am thrilled to see the weather warm up. It makes the sun seem so much brighter and warmer than what it has been. I received another soap submission from Belinda.

 

Hi, I’m Belinda from Vienna, Austria.

I’m a new soaper (since December) and I’m so into soaping. Actually, soap making did not come to me as a pastime hobby but a necessity. When the supper typhoon Haiyan hit Philippines, I thought I have to do
something to help my countrymen… and making soap got my attention for fund raising. I’m so inspired of the endless ideas a person can do in soaping. From colors, shapes, ingredients, to exfoliants and other additives. It’s awesome!

But sad to say, There is NO soaping supply shops around Vienna!

My niece sent me few sample packs of colorants and I received my longed colorants last Friday Feb. 28th… boy, did I hit my kitchen counter right away and pull out all my soaping equipments.

This is a cold process soap which I made with 70% olive oil, 15% coconut virgin oil and 10% sweet almond oil with raw honey, and I used pure milk instead of water. ( Goat and sheep milk) I colored it with yellow oxide and opalescent green mica. Then I added dried Calendula Petals. Since I knew my soap would be ready around Spring time, I scented it with Lily of the Valley Fragrance Oil… a heavenly scent! I named this soap
“Honey Breeze”

So much was my excitement of my new colorants that I made one more small batch. Same measurements from above but I scented it with lavender essential oil, I then added dried lavender buds. I colored it with
ultramarine violet mixed with ultramarine blue, swirled with titanium oxide ( I must try to swirl! ). I named this soap “Lavender Mist”

I’m so happy that both batches came out good with my first time experimenting with colors and essential oils. My friends who supports our fund raising can’t wait to use these lovely soaps!

Here is a really cool thing. All proceeds of our fund raising will go towards the school supplies for children affected by the super typhoon.

Don’t forget! We will accept submissions for our challenge until March 20th! Here is a chance to strut your stuff and get a goodie box from the MMS Blog Kitchen. Good luck!

Taylor

Honey Breeze

Honey Breeze

Lavender Mist

Lavender Mist

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Spring is Here Challenge Soap Submission – Deborah

Friday, March 7th, 2014
Spring! Spring! Spring! I am ready for spring! I am ready for my bed to shed its blankets so I can enjoy cool sheets, not gripe about cold ones. I am ready for a gentle green color to coat the valley from mountain ridge to mountain ridge. Deborah is too! She submitted a soap for our Spring is Here Challenge!

 

The promise of blooming daffodils and tulips on the horizon of spring inspired this Hot Process soap. I am so looking forward to spring after this wet and dreary Georgia winter!

Don’t forget! We will accept submissions for our challenge until March 20th! Here is a chance to strut your stuff and get a goodie box from the MMS Blog Kitchen. Good luck!
Taylor

Deborah's Spring Soap

Deborah’s Spring Soap

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 5

Thursday, March 6th, 2014
Today we are going to make a soap I have been looking forward to all week! The luxury oil I will be using today is Emu Oil. Now some of you may be wondering why on earth someone would want to put oil from a bird in soap!

 

Emu Oil adds incredible emollient properties to soap. If you are wondering what emollient means, let me explain this phrase to you. The word emollient comes from Latin meaning to soften or relax. Soaps high in emollient oils are more conditioning. They make your skin feel soft and smooth.

I used both Coconut Oil and Palm Kernel Oil for some super lather in this soap. Many people associate many bubbles with being clean and because this soap will feel so different due to the Emu Oil, I wanted to make sure people still think they are getting clean.

I also switch my oils around a little for today’s soap. If my soap has 6 oz of Palm Kernel Oil and 5 oz of Coconut Oil, my bar is going to be brittle and have razor sharp edges. Changing thing around means that the edges will be softer and rounder.

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Emu Oil
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Olive Oil
142 grams Palm Kernel Oil
113 grams Coconut Oil
29 grams Emu Oil
70 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Olive Oil
5 oz Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz Coconut Oil
1 oz Emu Oil
2.46 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Olive Oil
31.25% Palm Kernel Oil
25% Coconut
6.25% Emu Oil
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this particular batch the temperature of my lye solution were 116°F and my oils were 124°F.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Removing Soap from Mold

Removing Soap from Mold

Weighed Oils

Weighed Oils

Melted Oils

Melted Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 4

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014
Today I want to make soaps with Palm Kernel Oil and Palm Oil. These oils are both used extensively in luxury soaps and are friendly to the pocket book of soapers. Have you ever made soap with either of these oils? What do you think about them? Do you want to try them? 

Palm Kernel Oil is our foundation oil for today’s soap. Palm Kernel Oil makes an almost brittle, white bar. Palm Kernel Oil makes an excellent base for soaps that are high in oils that makes soft bars. Palm Kernel Oil is also a lathering machine just like Coconut Oil.

Palm Oil is what is often referred to as Vegetable Tallow. Palm Oil makes a firm, pale straw-yellow soap. It contributes minimal lather.

Today there is a lot of concern with sustainability with Palm Oil. So much so that the soaping industry has changed some what. However, don’t forget, palm is very good at what it does. I will talk about sustainability of palm in another post so stay tuned! Palm is a stable oil that makes a hard bar. It can have some problems with fractionation but treating it correctly makes a huge difference. Read about how to deal with fractionated Palm Oil here. Proper treatment of Palm Oil greatly reduces one of the most common problems associated with it, DOS.

Are you ready? Let’s go make some soap. Don’t forget, if you have any questions, let us know and we will do our best to answer them!

 

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Palm Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Palm Kernel Oil
142 grams Palm Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5 oz Palm Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.25 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Palm Kernel Oil
31.25% Palm Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this soap, my oils were 126° F and my lye solution was 118°F.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface?

Once trace is reached, you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Removing Soap from Mold

Removing Soap from Mold

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Adding Lye Solution to Melted Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Melted Oils

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap in Mold

Soap in Mold

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soap Making – Day 3

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014
Wow! Yesterday, we made our first bar of soap. How is everyone doing? Did you have any problems? Are you ready for your next batch? I think I am! Come join me for another batch of soap! 

Today I thought we would keep all of our oils the same except for one. I wanted to show you that changing just one oil in your formulation can change your bar. Today we will be using Tallow instead of Hydrogenated Soybean Oil.

Tallow is a solid oil that comes from the body fat and suet of cattle. Other animals that are processed for meat also offer tallow, but their names are used to make the source clear, deer tallow, sheep tallow, etc. It is solid at room temperature and can be stored in an airtight container without needing to be refrigerated. Tallow makes a hard but not brittle bar. Tallow has long been used because it is from the fat that comes from butchering an animal for meat. Tallow was more easily available and people were able to collect all enough for the things they would use tallow for. Some of these thing include candles, soaps or even as a lubricant for guns.

Except for the tallow, our recipe is the same as yesterday’s. Let’s go make some soap!

Ingredients
Tallow
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Tallow
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
65 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Tallow
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.29 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Tallow
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits now, before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. We recommend having your oils and lye solution within 10°F of each other. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures. For this particular batch my oils were 130°F and my lye solution was 124°F.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing has stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieved trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface? This short distraction will allow unmixed oil to rise to the surface.

Once trace is reached you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but where they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Mixing Lye Solution and Oils

Mixing Lye Solution and Oils

Ready to Mix

Ready to Mix

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Soap Ready for Mold

Soap Ready for Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Introduction to Soapmaking – Day 2

Monday, March 3rd, 2014
Yippee! Today we get to make our first batch of soap! Are you excited? I know I am! Let’s go make some soap.

 

For our first batch, I am going to use Shea Butter as our splurge oil. Shea Butter is very popular in soaps, particularly for soaps that are being sold. We like it because it doesn’t contribute significant amounts of color or odor. This allows soap-makers who sell their products change colors and fragrances without needing to change their formulation for each and every batch. 1 oz of Shea Butter. Check!

Next, I am going to use Olive Oil. I prefer to use Olive Oil for my number 4 of my 6-5-4-1 formula. Olive Oil is easily available and it is a great lather producer. Olive Oil makes small, dense bubbles in a soap. 4 oz of Olive Oil. Check!

I wanted to use Coconut Oil for my number 5 of my 6-5-4-1 formula. Coconut Oil is the one that contributes large bubbles, light, airy lather. I also like how easy it is to find Coconut Oil. 5 oz of Coconut Oil. Check!

My final oil for our first batch is Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Hydrogenated Soybean Oil helps keeps costs low while creating a hard, white colored bar of soap. 6 oz of Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Check!

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Water
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Thermometer
Immersion Blender

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
142 grams Coconut Oil
113 grams Olive Oil
29 grams Shea Butter
64 grams Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
177 mL Water
Recipe in Ounces
6 oz Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
5 oz Coconut Oil
4 oz Olive Oil
1 oz Shea Butter
2.26 oz Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
6 fl oz Water
Recipe in Percentages
37.5% Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
31.25% Coconut Oil
25% Olive Oil
6.25% Shea Butter
Q.S. Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)
Q.S. Water

Weigh the oils into a microwave safe container. Place into the microwave and heat. While the oils are heating, weigh the lye. Slowly add the lye to your container of water. DO NOT add water to your container of lye. The two chemicals reacting can cause a dangerous volcano. It is best to create good safety habits now, before you make a batch of soap that is 20 lbs in size.

For most soaps, you will want to mix your oils and lye solution when both are somewhere between 110°F to 130°F. We recommend having your oils and lye solution within 10°F of each other. In the winter when your soaping area is cooler, you will want to soap at higher temperatures. In the summer when your soaping area is warmer, you will want to soap at cooler temperatures.

When your lye solution and oils are within the ideal temperature range, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils. Using either an immersion or a soap spoon, mix until you reach trace. Trace is when the raw soap has been mixed enough that oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing has stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieved trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface? This short distraction will allow unmixed oil to rise to the surface.

Once trace is reached you can pour the soap into a mold. Allow the soap to sit undisturbed for 12-24 hours. After the soap has been allowed to sit for up to 24 hours, you can unmold the soap and cut it. Arrange the cut bars of soap in an area where there is good air flow but where they will not be in the way. I like to put them on a sheet of cardboard. You are now ready for the curing process. The curing process is just allow the soap to dry out, giving you a nice hard bar. You can use your soap immediately after cutting but it will not last as long as a fully cured bar.

A great way to determine if your bar has cured all the way is to use our Cure Cards! Did you know you can get them free in qualifying orders? How cool!
Taylor

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Making Lye Solution

Making Lye Solution

Mixing Lye Solution and Oils

Mixing Lye Solution and Oils

Ready to Blend

Ready to Blend

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap

Pouring Soap into Mold

Pouring Soap into Mold

Soap in the Mold

Soap in the Mold

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Introduction to Soap Making – Day 1

Friday, February 28th, 2014
Here at MMS we have a great technical support team. They are able to answer all of the questions a soap maker can have about what went wrong or right with their batch of soap. When you are starting out, all of the information and lingo can be overwhelming, so we are here to make it easier and fun! 

During the next two weeks, we will be covering a lot of information and recipes perfect for newbies or those who have been struggling with soap gremlins ruining batches. If you are new or are just at the end of your limit, email us with your questions or concerns! We will try to cover all of your questions in this series. We are here to help!

Today we are going to start with discussing our 6-5-4-1 Formula. This formula is really a set of guidelines and it is great because it helps create a fool-proof batch. The 6-5-4-1 formula will have a total of 1 lb in oils. If you follow the basic rules for our 6-5-4-1 soap formula, you will get a hard, lathering bar every time!

Let’s start with the 1 oz of oils for our soap batch. This will be our luxury oil. There are a lot of luxury oils out there. Shea Butter, Avocado Oil, Cocoa Butter, Lanolin, Peach Kernel Oil and Seabuckthorn Oil are just a few of the many options.

When choosing your luxury oil, one of the big questions you need to ask yourself is “Why am I making soap?” You will choose different luxury oils if you are making soap for yourself, family and friends or if you are making soap to sell. When making soap, your luxury oil needs to be targeted to the audience you want.

It can be hard to limit yourself to just 1 oz of luxury oil but stick to 1 oz. Why? If a little is good, isn’t more better? No, high amounts of certain luxury oils can cause things like DOS (dreaded orange spots), lack of lather, soft bars or even sticky, gloopy messes.

Luxury oils are also just what they are called, they are luxury items. This means there is a limited amount of the product in the world. Yes, you can make a soap using only Shea Butter but it is not cost effective and the practice isn’t sustainable. We can all contribute to “going green” by keeping and using luxury oils for what they are.

Our next number is 4. I prefer to use something that provides small, dense lather. Olive Oil is a good choice here. It will contribute great lather without making the bar too soft. Soaps that have a high amount of Olive Oil take a long time to cure and as a general rule, are very soft. Other oils that contain high oleic fatty acids will be good alternatives to Olive Oil. Some of those alternatives can Rice Bran Oil, Sunflower Oil, Peanut Oil and even Safflower Oil.

Next on our list is our number 5. For our number 5 oil, we need oils that contribute to large bubbly lather. Things like Coconut Oil and Palm Kernel Oil fit the bill.

Number 6 is our foundation oil. Now you may be wondering why we didn’t start with the “foundation” oil first. When building a house, you need to start with a foundation but you also need to know what cabinets you are going to put in the kitchen and where the bathroom will be located. If the foundation/floor plan and the cabinets don’t work together, you get frustrated, annoyed and even angry. Let’s try to prevent that by having the whole work together well from the start.

For the foundation, we recommend you use easily available oils that create a nice hard bar. Things like Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Lard, Tallow and Palm Oil are all easy-to-find, inexpensive oils that make wonderful hard bars of soap. The oils that make the best foundation are solid at room temperatures.

During the next two weeks, there are two pieces of equipment that are vital to making soap. The first one is a good scale.  Great soaps have their oils weighed out. They are never measured by volume. The other thing you will need is an instant read thermometer. A surprising number of batches that fail are due to temperature problems.

If you have any questions you want covered during the next two weeks, leave us a comment or email us! We will do our very best to help you. We want you to succeed so you can truly enjoy the process of making your own handmade soap.

Taylor

What is your luxury oil?

What is your luxury oil?

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