Curing Soap

20130131-110955.jpgWe get a lot of questions about curing soap. The typical thought of our callers is that soap is dangerous until it has cured for 3 to 6 weeks. This is dangerous thinking! Soap is a fantastic chemical reaction between a fat and an alkali. The resulting product is a synergy of these two items, fat + alkali = soap. In times long ago many items were cleaned with fats. Can you imagine cleaning with fats and oils? Most likely you can’t. We all know how harsh some modern chemical cleaners are, and we often wear gloves when using these types of products. Soap is a wonderful blend which is greater than either of its components, the synergy that sparks our interest and excites our minds.

So, how does one tell when their soap is cured and why is curing needed if the soap is not dangerous? First, it is important to understand the phase we call cure time or curing. This length of time is location and weather dependent. Curing is used to have each bar of soap come to an equilibrium of how much water the soap retains, a balance between soap and atmosphere. Curing is to allow each soap to dry to the fullest extent allowed in each location so the resulting bar can last as long as possible. When using soap that is 24 hours old we know the soap quickly reduces in size because too much soap is being used at each washing, the soap is dissolving too quickly and going right down the drain. Keeping a cured soap dry between uses is important. So, curing is essentially dehydrating. Because we are not adding any other means than maybe a fan in a room with good air circulation we don’t think of this as a mechanical means of dehydrating, but drying is nonetheless what is happening. How does one tell the soap has cured? Easy! Use your scale!

A scale is the most valuable tool we use in making soap. Some would argue that they could never give up their immersion blenders but I will argue that there is nothing to blend until the weight of the oils and fats is known. I’m not the most excited person when thinking of hand stirring a large batch of soap, but I certainly will draw the line that my scale is my most valued lab tool.

So… how do we do this? CURE CARDS to the rescue! We printed a quick reference card to help you with your record keeping. Each pad has 50 sheets of of CURE CARDS, peel one off and use with each batch you are curing. Write the name of the batch and date it was made. Then stack your cut bars to dry. Pin the card down with the lead bar in each curing stack. Weigh that lead soap every few days and record the date and weight. When your soap stops losing weight then your soap is fully cured! These card packs are now in our catalog and can be had for free through our Free Gifts and Teas program. Isn’t this great? I am really excited to share my no-fail method of knowing when a soap is cured. Once your soap has cured, keep this CURE CARD in your records so you will know how long the batch has cured before being wrapped for sale. You do keep records, don’t you?

Tina

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Perception of Cosmetics

Skin lightening products display in a grocery store in Beijing, China.
Skin lightening products display in a grocery store in Beijing, China.

Living in China is beginning to open my eyes to the different way that the Chinese seem to regard lotions, creams, lip balms, soaps and other similar cosmetic products as more than just cosmetics. I’ve worked with these products and ingredients for so long that I have to consciously remind myself that not everyone looks at these things the same way! When I was sharing my perspectives with Tina, she pointed out that even in the USA there are some ways that cosmetics are perceived to be more than cosmetics.

Thanks to clever marketing teams around the world, the line between cosmetics and drugs is a little (ok, very) hazy. This is very true for someone who hasn’t studied, worked with or made cosmetics. There are many examples of this in both China and the USA. I’ve compiled a list of examples from both countries to share how marketing and placement in stores has effected the perception of cosmetics.

Sunscreen and SPF:
I’m going to use this as a brief example because I don’t want to reiterate previous blog posts and bore you! Any lotions, creams, gels or lip balms claiming an SPF and/or sunscreen properties are technically drugs. These must be tested by approved labs and follow FDA guidelines for the manufacture and sale of drugs. We often receive requests for help formulating products that work to give cosmetics a SPF. Since these are drugs and require LOTS of lab testing, we recommend to our customers that they work on making great cosmetic products for themselves and/or their customers. Then purchase the necessary SPF products from reputable companies that have done the testing to receive that SPF rating from an independent lab.

Skin Lightening Products:
Here in China, women want to have pale skin. It is very odd as a foreigner to be complimented for having a skin color that in the USA would be considered too pale and in need of a tan. The stores that are dedicated to women’s cosmetics often have full sections dedicated to products that are either claimed or implied to lighten skin color. These products may or may not actually lighten skin. I believe that in the USA, these products would firmly fall under the category of drugs if they are claimed to lighten skin color as that causes a skin alteration.

Belly Balms, Creams and Scar Reducing Treatments:
This seems to be an international desire to have scars and stretch marks fade away. This is actually a genetic issue that can’t be fixed by a topical product. People are either prone or not to stretch marks and more obvious scars. Stretch marks come from quick weight gain and changing skin. If a person is prone to stretch marks, then they can get them at any time if the body changes quickly. Sadly, cosmetics can’t fix these deep dermal scars. While it doesn’t mean these scars and stretch marks will go away, you can still apply that body cream and pamper your body because it deserves it!

There are people all around the world that only want to buy lotions, creams, lip balms, soaps and other similar cosmetic products if these products can “heal” or “cure”. As these words fall under drug claims, it can risky for any cosmetic maker to use these words. Instead, use words like “indulgent”, “invigorating”, “calming” or “pampering” as these words will keep you from making drug claims for your products and still encourage sales!

I hope this has been a bit of food for thought. What do you think? What words can you come up with that prevent you from making drug claims?

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Contemporary Mint Lip Balm

Yesterday I shared one of the recipes I have been using to give to friends that I run into as I explore the city of Beijing. However, I flavored the entire batch with Rose. I find that there are some who don’t want the floral rose as a flavor. So I decided to make another lip balm with a slightly different formulation for them. Come join me for this other recipe!

 

I wasn’t looking for something that would be as glossy or creamy. I wanted more of a work horse formulation. I wanted something that would be more acceptable among men. Men don’t look for a creamy, smooth gliding and shiny lip balm. They want something helps prevent chapped lips. I think this is perfect for that!

I wasn’t worried so much about color and I find Beeswax is a more available in my own cupboard. Based on your needs, you can use Soy Wax, Calendula or even Carnauba Wax. I personally prefer beeswax. Perhaps it reminds me of my father and the smell of him when he came in from tending the beehives.

I also used Babassu Oil in this recipe. It is very smooth and creamy. Also it adds a softness and silkiness to the finished product. It is perfect because it balances the world of luxury oils and the world of economical oils. I love it when awesome oils such as this are at an affordable price!

I also used Rice Bran Oil. Rice Bran is a lighter oil which helps the lip balm from feeling heavy or greasy. Perfect for a workhorse lip balm. What oils would you use?

I also added a small amount of Menthol Crystals. Menthol Crystals add a cooling and tingling sensation to the lips. I have many people ask me for a strong mint flavored lip balm. I find adding a small amount of menthol crystals to a lip balm with peppermint makes them happy without worrying about exceeding the usage rate of the Peppermint Essential Oil.

Ingredients
Beeswax
Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
Shea Butter, High Melt Point
Babassu Oil
Castor Oil
Rice Bran Oil
Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
Peppermint Essential Oil
Menthol Crystals
Blue Oil Soluble Lip Color
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
20 grams Beeswax
15 grams Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
10 grams Shea Butter, High Melt Point
15 grams Babassu Oil
9 grams Castor Oil
29 grams Rice Bran Oil
1 gram Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
1 gram Peppermint Essential Oil
Q.S. Menthol Crystals
Q.S. Blue Oil Soluble Lip Color
Recipe in Ounces
Beeswax
Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
Shea Butter, High Melt Point
Babassu Oil
Castor Oil
Rice Bran Oil
Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
Peppermint Essential Oil
Menthol Crystals
Blue Oil Soluble Lip Color
Recipe in Percentages
20% Beeswax
15% Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
10% Shea Butter, High Melt Point
15%Babassu Oil
9% Castor Oil
29% Rice Bran Oil
1% Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
1% Peppermint Essential Oil
Q.S. Menthol Crystals
Q.S. Blue Oil Soluble Lip Color

 

Weigh everything except Sugar Baby Flavor Oil, Peppermint Essential Oil and Blue Lip Balm in a microwave safe container. Heat everything gently until it is crystal clear. Add the Sugar Baby Flavor Oil, Peppermint Essential Oil and Blue Lip Balm. I used a toothpick to add the Blue Lip Color. With this ingredient, a toothpick amount is all you need. A little goes a long way. Stir well. Pour into containers and allow to cool. Label and enjoy!

 

 

Taylor

Finished Lip Balm
Finished Lip Balm
Weighing Ingredients
Weighing Ingredients
Melted Lip Balm Solution
Melted Lip Balm Solution
Menthol Crystal
Menthol Crystal

Melted Lip Balm Solution
Melted Lip Balm Solution
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Rating: 5.0/5 (6 votes cast)

Simple Rose Lip Balm

Christmas and New Year are not big holidays here in China. Now Christmas doesn’t particularly surprise me but I thought that there might some excitement over the Gregorian calendar New Year. I was surprised to find that most people go out for dinner or maybe karaoke but otherwise it would be just another quiet night in Beijing, China.(As quiet as a night gets in such a large city. ;-) )

 

However, China is gearing up for the Lunar New Year. The enormity of the holiday is crashing about my ears!I have found that as people get ready to go home for the Lunar New Year or I get introduced to new people, it is common for gifts to be exchanged. I wanted to share my two recipes for a lip balm that I keep in my bag just in case I find myself in need of a small gift to exchange. And the best part is that a lip balm doesn’t take much space in my purse either!

Today we will be looking at recipe I formulated both for texture and light color. I prefer creamy, smooth and easy to apply lip balms. I also really like lip balms light in color, especially when I will be adding color to it.

I used Soy Wax because it is so light in color. However, I have found that using the Soy Wax is a little tricky. You need to make sure that is is fully melted. The liquid lip balm mixture should have a bright, clear, glistening quality to it. Otherwise, you may struggle with fractionation, due to the fact that it wasn’t fully melted.

I used High Melt Point Shea Butter in this formulation. I prefer High Melt Point Shea Butter over the regular Shea Butter for anhydrous mixtures, like lip balm. Shea Butter lends a creamy and soft shine to the lip balm.

I also used Peach Kernel Oil. It is a light oil that adds a nice smoothness to the lip balm without lending a heavy greasiness to the final product. I think Peach Kernel Oil is a absolute must to add to your selection of luxury oils.

The last little things I added to this recipe was a flavor oil, essential oil and lip balm color. I wanted it to be flavored with the Rose Otto Essential Oil but I also wanted it to be a little sweeter. I also wanted a smidgen of color. I thought an elegant pink would fit the flavor perfectly!

 

 

Ingredients
Soy Wax
Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
Shea Butter, High Melt Point
Macadamia Butter
Castor Oil
Peach Kernel Oil
Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
Rose Otto
Ruby Lip Color
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
20 grams Soy Wax
15 grams Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
15 grams Shea Butter, High Melt Point
10 grams Macadamia Butter
30 grams Castor Oil
9 grams Peach Kernel Oil
1 gram Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
Q.S. Rose Otto
Q.S. Ruby Lip Color
Recipe in Ounces
0.7 oz Soy Wax
0.52 oz Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
0.52 oz Shea Butter, High Melt Point
0.35 oz Macadamia Butter
1.05 oz Castor Oil
0.31 oz Peach Kernel Oil
0.03 oz Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
Q.S. Rose Otto
Q.S. Ruby Lip Color
Recipe in Percentages
20% Soy Wax
15% Cocoa Butter, Deodorized
15% Shea Butter, High Melt Point
10% Macadamia Butter
30% Castor Oil
9% Peach Kernel Oil
1% Sugar Baby Flavor Oil
Q.S. Rose Otto
Q.S. Ruby Lip Color

Weigh everything except Sugar Baby Flavor Oil, Rose Otto and Ruby Lip Balm in a microwave safe container. Heat everything gently until it is crystal clear. If it does not get hot enough to completely melt the Soy Wax, it could fractionate. If unsure, try the plate test before putting into containers. Add the Rose Otto, Sugar Baby Flavor Oil and Ruby Lip Color. I used a toothpick to add the Ruby Lip Color and the Rose Otto. With both of these ingredients, a toothpick amount is all you need. A little goes a long way. Stir well. Pour into containers and allow to cool. Label and enjoy!

 

Taylor

Finished Lip Balm
Finished Lip Balm
Weighing Ingredients
Weighing Ingredients
Melted Oils
Melted Oils

Adding Color and Flavor Oils
Adding Color and Flavor Oils
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Severe winter weather, oh my!

Northern Utah is under a blanket of partly cloudy that looks like massive amounts of snow. We are not expecting to be to work Monday morning. In  the event our roads are clear, the sun comes out and the birds begin to sing, then we will be at work. If the weather continues as expected, please forgive our absence because the safety of our crew is of most importance.

Thank you!

Tina

 

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A Full Moon, Homesickness and the Perfect Tea Time Cookie

As China prepares for the biggest festival of the year, I find myself a little homesick. The Lunar New Year is all about being with your family, your loved ones. Even though this is my first Lunar New Year, the realization the my loved ones are an ocean away pulls at my heart and mists my eyes. 

 

I also struggled with homesickness during the Mid-Autumn Festival, another festival with friends and family at its center. I struggled with the internal war of being so far from home until a friend pulled me away from the food, games and people. We stood at the window and she spoke to me in a combination of broken English and Chinese.

Allow me to summarize for you. She told me of a legend of two lovers. One is trapped on the Moon and the other is trapped on Earth. During the Mid-Autumn Festival, a flock of birds form a bridge, allowing the lovers to meet and spend one night together. She said “Think of the Moon as being a modern bridge for you now. You may be on the other side of the world, but you and your loved ones can always look at the moon. You may be far apart but the moon brings your hearts close.”

It was a wonderful and mesmerizing way to ease my homesickness. She hadn’t scolded me, told me to make myself busy or that it would go away. She reminded me that it is okay to be homesick and miss things from home. As I am suffering from a new bout of homesickness, I thought it would be fun to make something that reminded me of home and I wanted to share it with you. Especially if you consider the fact that today is the full moon.

The thing that reminds me so much of home is shortbread. It also happens to be the perfect tea time cookie! I remember when my mother would make shortbread when I was little. She has these beautiful shortbread pans that are made from brown clay. Some of them are elegant and dainty while others are cute or silly. One of my favorites had a lace like pattern and I also really like the pig with wings. I remember when my mother would make shortbread, I would pull out all the little dishes that belonged to my tea set and we would have to together. Why don’t you join my mother and me for some scrumptious shortbread and tea? I would love for you to join us!

Ingredients
Butter, Salted
Confectioners Sugar (Powder Sugar)
Vanilla Extract
All Purpose Flour
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
227 grams Butter, Salted
113 grams Confectioners Sugar (Powder Sugar)
2 teaspoons Vanilla Extract
241 grams All Purpose Flour
Recipe in Ounces
8 oz Butter, Salted
4 oz Confectioners Sugar (Powder Sugar)
2 teaspoons Vanilla Extract
8.5 oz All Purpose Flour
Recipe in Volume
1 cup Butter, Salted
1 cup Confectioners Sugar (Powder Sugar)
2 teaspoons Vanilla Extract
2 cups All Purpose Flour

 

Beat together the butter, sugar, and vanilla, then beat in the flour. The mixture may seem a little dry at first; keep beating till it comes together. If it absolutely won’t come together, dribble in up to 1 tablespoon of water, until it does. This is a stiff dough. Divide the dough in half, and press each half into one of the prepared pans, smoothing the surface with your fingers, or with a mini rolling pin. Use a fork to prick the dough all over; this allows any steam to escape, and prevents the shortbread from bubbling as it bakes. You can prick the dough in a random pattern, but it looks nicer pricked with some kind of symmetry. Bake the shortbread until it’s a light golden color, about 35 minutes. Remove it from the oven, and immediately turn the shortbread out onto a clean work surface. Using a sharp knife cut the shortbread into pieces. (Do this while the shortbread is still warm; if you wait until it’s cool, it won’t cut easily.) Transfer the shortbread wedges to a rack to cool. Enjoy!

 

Note: If you don’t have powdered sugar on hand, you can use the same amount of sugar as listed above and a tablespoon of cornstarch. It will work just fine. In fact, that is what I had to do!

 

Taylor

Finished Cookie
Finished Cookie
Weighing Out Butter
Weighing Out Butter
Adding Sugar & Cornstarch
Adding Sugar & Cornstarch
Creaming Sugar, Butter and Cornstarch
Creaming Sugar, Butter and Cornstarch
Mixing in Flour
Mixing in Flour
Mixing Ingredients
Mixing Ingredients
Mixed Dough
Mixed Dough
Pressing Dough into Pan
Pressing Dough into Pan
Shortbread Dough waiting to be baked
Shortbread Dough waiting to be baked

Poking Holes into Dough
Poking Holes into Dough
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Rating: 5.0/5 (5 votes cast)

Humectant Comparison in Lotion, Honey

Today is the last day of our humectant comparison tests. To review the testing process, I am using the Granny’s Lotion recipe as my testing recipe. Tomorrow, I will test all of the lotions to discover my favorite humectant!

Today we are making the test batch with Honey. As a humectant, Honey is a natural humectant and will help the skin retain moisture.

I decided to test the humectant directly on my skin to add more notes about the feeling on my skin. Honey is thick, viscous and straw colored in appearance. Rubbing the Honey into my skin was very difficult to do. I felt like I was rubbing a thick and sticky salve on to my hand. The sticky feeling increased, but did not go away. After washing my hands, my skin felt soft.

Let’s head off to try out the recipe using Honey as our humectant!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Water
Colorless Jojoba Oil
Honey
Stearic Acid
Emulsifying Wax
Liquid Germall Plus
21 Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Containers for cream (I used a 4 oz Frosted Bottle and Champagne Disk Tops.)

Recipe: (Makes 4.2 ounces or 120 grams)

Recipe in ounces:
3.17 ounces Water
0.63 ounces Colorless Jojoba Oil
0.12 ounces Honey
0.12 ounces Stearic Acid
0.12 ounces Emulsifying Wax
0.02 ounces Liquid Germall Plus
0.02 ounces 21 Fragrance Oil
Recipe in grams:
90 grams Water
18 grams Colorless Jojoba Oil
3.6 grams Honey
3.6 grams Stearic Acid
3.6 grams Emulsifying Wax
0.6 grams Liquid Germall Plus
0.6 grams 21 Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
75% Water
15% Colorless Jojoba Oil
3% Honey
3% Stearic Acid
3% Emulsifying Wax
0.5% Liquid Germall Plus
0.5% 21 Fragrance Oil
Cooled lotion on my finger.
Cooled lotion on my finger.

Weighed ingredients before melting.
Weighed ingredients before melting.

Honey sticking on my hand.
Honey sticking on my hand.

Weigh all ingredients except the additives (Liquid Germall Plus and Fragrance) into a microwave safe container. Heat in the microwave using short time bursts until everything is melted. Blend the ingredients to a smooth, creamy consistency using the immersion blender. Add the additives once the temperature drops to approximately 120° F in the mixing bucket. Stir gently until completely mixed. Pour into containers and allow to cool completely before labeling.

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Freebie Friday!

Melt & Pour Glycerin Soap

It has been quiet the week! I’ve been having fun with the humectant series and I’ll be sharing the results from my testing the lotions tomorrow!

Now, onto this week’s giveaway! This week we are giving away some partial items from our Production Department. Many of the partial items are sent to the blog kitchen and our collection of partial items has gotten overwhelming! Not only are you helping us keep the blog kitchen clean, but you get to play with some new goodies too! This week’s goodies include Transparent Melt & Pour Soap, Lavender Buds, Strawberry Seeds, and a 1 oz bottle of Mediterranean Silk Fragrance!

The winner for this week is … Catalina! Congratulations! I will be sending you an e-mail for your mailing address. Your treasure box will be sent out next week!

Remember, if you comment any time during the week, you are automatically entered into the Freebie Friday Drawing.

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Humectant Comparison in Lotion, Sodium Lactate

Today is the second to last day of our humectant comparison tests. To review the testing process, I am using the Granny’s Lotion recipe as my testing recipe. Saturday, I will test all of the lotions to discover my favorite humectant!

Today we are making the test batch with Sodium Lactate. As a humectant, Sodium Lactate is derived from lactic acid and will help the skin feel soft and
moisturized for a long period of time.

I decided to test the humectant directly on my skin to add more notes about the feeling on my skin. Sodium Lactate is fluid and clear in appearance, sugar water-like in viscosity. Rubbing the Sodium Lactate into my skin, I felt a velvety and powder-like feel on the skin. I continued rubbing and the feeling changed to a barely-there tacky texture that was also partly silky.

Cooled lotion on my finger.
Cooled lotion on my finger.
Let’s head off to try out the recipe using Sodium Lactate as our humectant!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Water
Colorless Jojoba Oil
Sodium Lactate
Stearic Acid
Emulsifying Wax
Liquid Germall Plus
French Lime Blossom Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Containers for cream (I used a 4 oz Frosted Bottle and Champagne Disk Tops.)

Recipe: (Makes 4.2 ounces or 120 grams)

Recipe in ounces:
3.17 ounces Water
0.63 ounces Colorless Jojoba Oil
0.12 ounces Sodium Lactate
0.12 ounces Stearic Acid
0.12 ounces Emulsifying Wax
0.02 ounces Liquid Germall Plus
0.02 ounces French Lime Blossom Fragrance Oil
Recipe in grams:
90 grams Water
18 grams Colorless Jojoba Oil
3.6 grams Sodium Lactate
3.6 grams Stearic Acid
3.6 grams Emulsifying Wax
0.6 grams Liquid Germall Plus
0.6 grams French Lime Blossom Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
75% Water
15% Colorless Jojoba Oil
3% Sodium Lactate
3% Stearic Acid
3% Emulsifying Wax
0.5% Liquid Germall Plus
0.5% French Lime Blossom Fragrance Oil

Weigh all ingredients except the additives (Liquid Germall Plus and Fragrance) into a microwave safe container. Heat in the microwave using short time bursts until everything is melted. Blend the ingredients to a smooth, creamy consistency using the immersion blender. Add the additives once the temperature drops to approximately 120° F in the mixing bucket. Stir gently until completely mixed. Pour into containers and allow to cool completely before labeling.

Weighed ingredients before melting.
Weighed ingredients before melting.

Labeled bottle of finished lotion.
Labeled bottle of finished lotion.
Sodium Lactate pooled on my hand.
Sodium Lactate pooled on my hand.

Sodium Lactate dripping off my hand.
Sodium Lactate dripping off my hand.
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Rating: 4.8/5 (5 votes cast)

Humectant Comparison in Lotion, HoneyQuat

Today we are continuing with our humectant comparison tests. To review the testing process, I am using the Granny’s Lotion recipe as my testing recipe. Once all the test batches have been made, I will test the lotions to discover my favorite humectant!

Today we are making the test batch with HoneyQuat. As a humectant, HoneyQuat is a mixture of Honey and a low molecular weight quaternary derivative.

I decided to test the humectant directly on my skin to add more notes about the feeling on my skin. HoneyQuat is very fluid and straw-colored in appearance, soda pop-like in viscosity. Rubbing the HoneyQuat into my skin, I felt a slippery and dragging feel on the skin that quickly changed into a slightly sticky feeling. The sticky feeling was almost like that of spilled soda as it dries. My skin felt sticky until I washed my hands but after washing, my hands felt very moisturized.

Cooled lotion on my finger.
Cooled lotion on my finger.
Due to the texture, I would use no more than 3% of HoneyQuat in any lotion or cream recipe. I think HoneyQuat would be best used in lotions or creams that are meant to have a longer application/massaging in time.

Let’s head off to try out the recipe using HoneyQuat as our humectant!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Water
Colorless Jojoba Oil
HoneyQuat
Stearic Acid
Emulsifying Wax
Liquid Germall Plus
Vanilla Yogurt Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Containers for cream (I used a 4 oz Frosted Bottle and Champagne Disk Tops.)

Recipe: (Makes 4.2 ounces or 120 grams)

Recipe in ounces:
3.17 ounces Water
0.63 ounces Colorless Jojoba Oil
0.12 ounces HoneyQuat
0.12 ounces Stearic Acid
0.12 ounces Emulsifying Wax
0.02 ounces Liquid Germall Plus
0.02 ounces Vanilla Yogurt Fragrance Oil
Recipe in grams:
90 grams Water
18 grams Colorless Jojoba Oil
3.6 grams HoneyQuat
3.6 grams Stearic Acid
3.6 grams Emulsifying Wax
0.6 grams Liquid Germall Plus
0.6 grams Vanilla Yogurt Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
75% Water
15% Colorless Jojoba Oil
3% HoneyQuat
3% Stearic Acid
3% Emulsifying Wax
0.5% Liquid Germall Plus
0.5% Vanilla Yogurt Fragrance Oil

Weigh all ingredients except the additives (Liquid Germall Plus and Fragrance) into a microwave safe container. Heat in the microwave using short time bursts until everything is melted. Blend the ingredients to a smooth, creamy consistency using the immersion blender. Add the additives once the temperature drops to approximately 120° F in the mixing bucket. Stir gently until completely mixed. Pour into containers and allow to cool completely before labeling.

Weighed ingredients before melting.
Weighed ingredients before melting.
Labeled bottle of finished lotion.
Labeled bottle of finished lotion.
HoneyQuat pooled on my hand.
HoneyQuat pooled on my hand.

There it goes!
There it goes dripping off my hand!
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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)