Making Wax Melts for Warmers

Wow! What a fun item to make! In our November class we had the opportunity to make our own fabulous wax melts. I really enjoy my warmers that I have in different rooms throughout my home, but at times wanted to use my own fragrances that I enjoy from thesage.com. Here is a recipe for you to follow and make your own wax melts.

Wax Melts Recipe
Soy Wax
Fractionated Coconut Oil
Fragrance
Multi-cube Clamshell

Weigh 1 lb. Soy Wax, add 1 lb. Fractionated Coconut Oil. Heat together on medium until fully melted. We used the Mulit-cube clamshell so we measured out 2.4 oz. of melted product into a small paper cup, then added fragrance 2 ml, stirred and then poured into the Multi-cube Clamshell. Be careful to not over heat your mixture, if it is too hot it can melt your Multi-cube Clamshells. After wax melts are cooled, then close the Multi-cube Clamshell container and label.

Everyone will be so impressed that you will be making this often for your friends and giving as gifts.

Enjoy and thanks to everyone in the class we had a great time!

Tonya

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)
Making Wax Melts for Warmers, 5.0 out of 5 based on 2 ratings

18 thoughts on “Making Wax Melts for Warmers”

  1. So, can these be used in any wax melter? I have a good Scentsy one, but also a cheaper one from Walmart…..

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)
    1. LuAnn,
      We have used this recipe in a variety of wax melters without any problems. We do recommend following the user instructions and never leave wax melters unattended.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  2. How long do these last, unlike wick candles that eventually burn away?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
    1. We estimate that one cube of the six cubes in the multi-cube clamshell will last for 3 weeks in a wax warmer. (Provided the people in the location where it is used don’t end up with a problem of olfactory fatigue.) Unused, for at least 3 years.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  3. I sent a second post, but don’t see it. I was asking why you use the fractioned coconut oil? What benefit does it add? Looking at some other “how to” make wax melts, they just use the wax.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
    1. We use the Fractionated Coconut Oil to lower the melt point of the Soy Wax as it has a current melt point that is too high. We wanted a softer wax that could handle the lower temperatures of a wax melter and be easy to remove from the dish if desired.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  4. Is there another oil I could use safely in place of the fractionated coconut?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
    1. Lisa,
      You can use any oil that can handle the temperatures of a wax melter. I hope this helps!

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
  5. I am having trouble with scent throw. It smells great in the pot and as I melt it down, but once I place the cube in the warmer theres little to no scent. Any thoughts you might have would be wonderful. Thanks

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    1. Carmen,
      It sounds like an olfactory fatigue issue. It is best to have someone test that is not in the area where this wax melt was made. When we make wax tarts, it is hard to get an opinion from anyone working in our building. :) Good luck!

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  6. Okay, one more question. Everyone in my house is sick, so I was wondering how essential oils would work with this recipe. I keep reading and hearing about Thieves oil, and how great those oils are to clean with, and diffuse into the air. So, any thoughts on how essential oils would work, and at what % would be used? Scentsy used to have a Eucalyptus one that we used alot when we were sick, but since they don’t carry it, and I can make my own, I thought it might be worth a try! Thanks!!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    1. I think I would try a soft pine or fir needle oil, as well as lavender, eucalyptus and peppermint. These are all potent oils and certainly a dilution is in order. I suspect that Eucalyptus and Peppermint will be down in the 10% or less range of the essential oil blend and the overall essential oil load into the wax will be 2 to 3% and no more. My hopes are that your family recovers quickly. The comments I have heard about this flu is that it runs like H1N1 without the pandemic side to the illness. In other words, it is long and awful. May I offer a chicken soup?

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  7. I hadn’t thought of using a pine oil, I think I do have fir needle, thanks for the suggestion! I had read about possibly using lemon and rosemary essential oils as well. What do you think of adding a tiny bit of menthol to it? Yes, this has been one of the nasty bugs, my two year old has RSV. We actually had chicken soup last night! It was pretty much the first thing he has eaten in quite a few days, I think we are on day 11 or 12, I’ve kind of lost track……

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    1. I would keep it light in finished odor. I can’t think of anything worse than being sick and breathing is difficult then a super strong essential oil is added to the mix. I think of horrible Vick’s Vapo-Rub nightmares. Fir, lemon, rosemary and the like are all good. Clean hard surfaces with alcohol (rubbing or ethanol) that has 0.5% essential oil blend in it. Door knobs, telephone handsets, counters, sinks and faucets all need attention while a family member is sick. Taylor made a chicken soup for Andee just the other day. Maybe she will write a blog about her chicken soup process. The cysteine in the chicken soup will help break up the mucus and make breathing easier.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  8. I hate Vapo-Rub too. I think the Four Thieves recipe is clove oil, lemon, cinnamon, eucalyptus, and rosemary. It’s supposed to be really good to clean with too, it’s just hard to want to clean all those places when you haven’t slept in over a week!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    1. LuAnn, you need the cleaning fairies to come in and make your home better. I wish my magic wand worked! For these oils I would work it in this order: Lemon, eucalyptus, rosemary, clove and cinnamon. Lemon being the greatest percentage of the final mixture. Something like 10% eucalyptus, 10% rosemary, 5% cinnamon, and 5% cloves or even drop cloves down to 2%. Lemon would make up the difference. I just think of the intensity of these odors and think ARGH! Can you tell I am not a perfume bottle in an elevator type?

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
  9. Your recipe says to add 1 lb. fractionated coconut oil to 1 lb. of soy wax. That seems like a lot of FCO. Is that correct?

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    1. Yes, it is very correct. Thank you for checking.

      The reason there is so much Fractionated Coconut Oil to the Soy Wax is the goal is to significantly lower the melting point of the wax. We are attempting a smooth melting block for wax warmers. Those lamps get warm but should never make the wax too hot to touch. We need the wax to melt readily in those melters and make the user happy.

      Cheers!
      Tina

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)
Add Comment Register

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>