Archive for June, 2011

Tropical Rose Soap

Thursday, June 30th, 2011
In the summer there is nothing better than a rich lather soap with oils from the tropics. Enjoy the splendor from a rich lathering soap with the luxury of Shea Butter. Tropical beaches with warm sand and cold drinks are now no more than a shower away! Who knew such a rich, extravagant vacation existed in the form of a bar? Come join me for some good summer fun. 

I really was delighted with the outcome of this soap. (Even though I soaped at too high of temperatures and ended up with a cosmetically challenged bar.) It is a glorious soft pink and this soap smells of heirloom tea roses. It reminds me of one time when I visited an older couple to help them pick apples from their enormous tree. Their backyard looked like it was ready to host a wedding. The yard was rimmed in gorgeous blooming heirloom tea roses. I have never smelled anything so good. Come join me in this beautiful yard surrounded by towering trees and blooming flowers.

When making this soap, I didn’t let my oils or lye solution cool like I should have. As a result, the soap volcanoed and I had to force it through saponification. This gave me a cosmetically challenged bar, but I was so impressed with my results, I can’t wait to make this again where the bars are perfect. (Cross your fingers for me!) Don’t forget to request one of these delightful soaps in your next order today!

Patience is a virture… patience is a virture… patience doesn’t exist in my being no matter how many times I utter those words!!!

Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients:
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Shea Butter, Refined
Water
Lye
Rose Fragrance Oil
Amethyst Pink Color
Equipment:
Scale
1 Gallon Soap Bucket
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Soap Mold
Glass Beakers
Immersion Blender
.15 cc Scoop
Pipettes

Recipe:

Recipes in Ounces
21 oz Coconut Oil
25 oz Palm Oil
32.75 oz Palm Kernel Oil
5.25  oz Shea Butter, Refined
32 oz Water
12.25 oz Lye
1 fl oz Rose Fragrance Oil
.15 cc scoop Amethyst Pink Color
Recipes in Grams
595 grams Coconut Oil
708 grams Palm Oil
928 grams Palm Kernel Oil
148 grams Shea Butter, Refined
907 grams Water
347 grams Lye
30 mL Rose Fragrance Oil
.15 cc scoop Amethyst Pink Color
Recipes in Percentages
19% Coconut Oil
23% Palm Oil
30% Palm Kernel Oil
5% Shea Butter, Refined
29% Water
11% Lye
1.5% Rose Fragrance Oil
Q.S. Amethyst Pink Color

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until a light trace is achieved. Add the Rose Fragrance Oil and  and mix well. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Soap

Weighing Oils

Weighing Oils

Weighing Lye

Heated Oils

Adding Lye Solution to Oils

Adding Amethyst Pink Color

Adding Amethyst Pink Color

Blending Soap

Blending Soap

Adding Rose Fragrance Oil

Stirring in Fragrance

Soap in Mold

Separated Soap

Blending Separated Soap

Blending Separated Soap

Soap in Mold (A second time)

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Dark Chocolate Italian Ice

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011
I love chocolate and once in a while I run into a recipe that finds a permanent location in my cookbook. One day, while I was browsing The Dish Forum, I discovered this Chocolate Italian Ice recipe posted by Subway Haiku calling to the chocolate lovers of the world! Yum. As I read more, I discovered that many people recommended using coffee in place of some of the water. I will have to try that. Don’t be afraid to experiment. You can add nuts or even chunks of brownie. Your imagination is the limit. In the mean time, let’s head for the kitchen for some good chocolate flavored fun! 

This Dark Chocolate Italian Ice really gave me some relief from my chocolate craving. I keep having to walk past Andee’s scrumptious chocolate soaps and my chocolate craving has become dangerous. (It is even scarier than my desk monster!) This Italian Ice has a permanent place in my freezer now! Mmn. I am thinking of heading to the park with some Chocolate Italian Ice and sitting on a park bench, enjoying the birds, the running stream and a glorious summer sunset. Come join me in the evenings until Sunday the 3rd. This would even be a great treat for the chocolate lovers who will be coming to join you to celebrate Independence Day!

Important Note: The types of chocolate you use in the recipe will affect the bitterness and intensity of this frozen dessert. If you like strong, dark, bitter chocolate, use dark cocoa powder and bittersweet chocolate. If you like more mild forms of chocolate then use light cocoa powder and a light baking chocolate or even a milk chocolate bar. The recipe below is extremely dark and potent. For most people, 1 tablespoon of the Dark Chocolate Italian Ice was pushing too much.

Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients
Dark Cocoa Powder
Sugar
Salt
Water
Baking Chocolate
Vanilla Extract
Equipment
Sauce Pan
Whisk
Ice Cream Maker
Bowel
Spoon

Recipe:

Recipe
3/4 cup Dark Cocoa Powder
1 cup Sugar
1 pinch Salt
2 cups Water, Boiling
3 ounces Baking Chocolate
1/2 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Combine cocoa, sugar and salt and whisk in 1/2 of boiling water to make a smooth thick paste. Slowly whisk in the remaining water and bring to a bare simmer over low heat. Turn off the heat and add the chocolate and vanilla. Stir until the chocolate is completely melted. Chill the mixture in a metal bowl set over ice water. Stir occasionally until thoroughly chilled. Churn in an ice cream maker until thick. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Dark Chocolate Italian Ice

Empty Pan

Cocoa Powder

Adding Sugar and Salt

Adding Water

Whisking Solution

Solution Simmering

Adding Vanilla

Adding Baking Chocolate

Chocolate Completely Melted

Transferring Chocolate to Metal Bowl

Bowl in Bath of Ice Water

Pouring Chocolate Into Ice Cream Maker

Chocolate in Ice Cream Maker

Ice Cream Maker at Work

Ice Cream Maker at Work

Mmn. Want a spoon?

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Chocolate & Vanilla Layered Soap

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011
Yesterday I shared the Chocolate Mint Layered Soap. While it was fun to make the soap, I do have to say that chocolate and mint reminds me of the winter holiday season, not the summer! I decided to make another layered soap with chocolate layers, but this time I wanted to use a vanilla layer. This made me think of several fond memories involving chocolate and vanilla. 

After all, my favorite childhood summertime memories involve chasing down the ice cream man and his truck so I could buy a ice cream sandwich. I also remember going down the street to the pharmacy that also had a small grocery section for Oreos. During the school year I didn’t go often, but I tried to go as often as I could during the summer. Who wouldn’t if they could?

While this layered soap doesn’t look exactly like an ice cream sandwich or an Oreo cookie, it does bring back those memories of a chocolate covered face and fingers. I made three separate batches of soap so I could have layers without dividing the raw soap. Each batch was 11 ounces and I filled a mold that holds a 2 pound batch. Join me in the blog kitchen to make soap as we stroll down memory lane.

Finished soap.

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Rating: 4.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Chocolate Mint Layered Soap

Monday, June 27th, 2011
Lately I have been craving any chocolate that I could get my paws on. (I mean hands!) Now, I truly mean any chocolate. Chocolate bars, chocolate chips, chocolate ice cream, brownies, chocolate shakes, you name it. If it contained chocolate, I wanted it 10 minutes ago. :razz: I’m beginning to feel like I should be suffering from Chocolate Fever or The Chocolate Touch. (Both of these books have been in my personal library since I was a young girl and I would highly recommend them. The links will take you to Amazon, but I suggest checking your local library or bookstore for these books first. Amazon will give the pictures of the covers and author information.)

Last week I decided that I needed to make a chocolate soap. I thought that if I acknowledged the craving in a way that wouldn’t be calorie laden, then the craving would subside. My only problem is that I’ve made a chocolate cold process soap before and I wanted to try something new. Looking for inspiration, I remembered a post that was released 2 years ago this month! I had visited Becky in her soap workshop and she showed me how she made soap. Her layered Fourth of July soap was the basic inspiration for my layered Chocolate Mint Soap. I made two separate batches of soap so I could have layers without dividing the raw soap. Each batch was 1 pound and I filled a mold that holds a 2 pound batch.

I’ve been finding any excuse possible to go check on my soap and take a big whiff. I’ve been told that it smells just like a York Peppermint Patty or a Junior Mint. All I know is that I still want chocolate and now I want to make peppermint brownies. Maybe I’ll make plain brownies. Either way, off to the blog kitchen to share the “how to” for this yummy soap.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Sweet Almond Oil
Castor Oil
Cocoa Butter, Regular
Palm Kernel Oil
Palm Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
Water (I used Reverse Osmosis Water)
Baking Chocolate
Mint Green Dry Color
Peppermint Essential Oil
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold of your choice (I will be using my Guerrilla Mold.)
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 20 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 3 minutes
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces: (Make two times)
3 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
1 ounce Castor Oil
2 ounces Cocoa Butter, Regular
5 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
5 ounces Palm Oil
2.23 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 ounces Water (I used Reverse Osmosis Water) 

Batch 1 Additions:
0.25 ounce Baking Chocolate
0.28 ounce Peppermint Essential Oil

Batch 2 Additions:
1 tsp Mint Green Dry Color
0.28 ounce Peppermint Essential Oil

Since this is a layered soap, I made two batches each weighing one pound. The fixed oils and essential oil were the same for both batches. The only difference is that I used Baking Chocolate to color Batch 1 and the Mint Green to color Batch 2.

Weigh fixed oils for both batches on your scale. Gently warm the fixed oils, one batch at a time, on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water for both batches. Mix well. Weigh the Peppermint Essential Oil in two beakers and set aside.

Batch 1:
Add the Baking Chocolate to the melted oils. Mix until the Baking Chocolate has been completely melted. Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. For me, this took almost 90 seconds to reach the thin trace. After the soap reached this point I added the Peppermint Essential Oil and mixed well. Once the fragrance was completely mixed into the raw soap, I poured the soap into the Guerrilla Mold. I allowed the soap to sit as I began mixing the second batch.

Batch 2:
Add the Mint Green Dry Color to the melted oils. Mix until the oil has completely suspended the Mint Green Dry Color. Combine the fixed oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Again, this took almost 90 seconds to reach the thin trace. After the soap reached this point I added the Peppermint Essential Oil and mixed well. Once the fragrance was completely mixed into the raw soap, I poured the soap onto a rubber scraper over the Guerrilla Mold to prevent divots in the chocolate layer. I allowed the soap to sit until was firm.

The next morning the soap was cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap has an ammonia like odor for the first 24 hours after cutting. After this time has passed, the soap has a chocolate mint odor. The colors will leave a slight coloration on a white washcloth, but it does wash out of the washcloth easily.

Thanks for joining me on my latest soaping adventure. I don’t think this soap helped cure my need for chocolate, but maybe it will help you! I at least hope this soap has inspired you to make something different. I know it has inspired me to try a few new ideas.

The Chocolate Mint Layered soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I really want to hear your comments about this soap. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Enjoy!

Finished Soap.

Weighed oils.

Almost completely melted oils.

Adding the baking chocolate to Batch 1 oils.

Mixing the oils and baking chocolate.

Adding the lye solution to the oils.

Mixing the raw soap.

Pouring the Batch 1 into the mold.

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Honey-Do Super Hand Cream

Friday, June 24th, 2011
A little while ago I had someone ask for some help formulating a stiff but non-greasy hand cream for her husband. Her husband had been using a “No Crack” Super Hand Cream that he loved, but he had just ran out. He begged her to see if she could make something for him. I helped her formulate this recipe. She wrote back to say that both she and her husband use, and love, it! Try this hand cream out on your significant other and see if that honey-do list doesn’t become a little shorter. Come join me in the kitchen to whip up this Honey-Do Super Hand Cream. 

The first time I made this hand cream I put it in a bottle. Whoops. It wasn’t exactly my most brilliant idea of the day. This hand cream is SUPER thick. You can hold the bottle upside down as long as you would like and it will not move. Na-ah, ain’t happening. Thank goodness the bottle is flexible because you have to squeeze the bottle to get it out. I highly recommend that you put this cream in a jar. You will save yourself a heartache and a headache.
Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients
Emulsifying Wax
Stearic Acid
Beeswax
Cocoa Butter
Coconut Oil
Lanolin
Vitamin E
Glycerin
Water
Optiphen
Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Pipettes
Containers for finished cream

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
10 grams Emulsifying Wax
10 grams Stearic Acid
10 grams Beeswax
10 grams Cocoa Butter
30 grams Coconut Oil
4 grams Lanolin
6 grams Vitamin E
4 grams Glycerin
114 grams Water
2 grams Optiphen
Recipe in Ounces
.35 ounces Emulsifying Wax
.35 ounces Stearic Acid
.35 ounces Beeswax
.35 ounces Cocoa Butter
1.06 ounces Coconut Oil
.14 ounces Lanolin
.21 ounces Vitamin E
.14 ounces Glycerin
4.02 ounces Water
.07 ounces Optiphen
Recipe in Percentages
5% Emulsifying Wax
5% Stearic Acid
5% Beeswax
5% Cocoa Butter
15% Coconut Oil
2% Lanolin
3% Vitamin E
2% Glycerin
57% Water
1% Optiphen

Weigh everything except the Optiphen into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Blend well. Allow to cool stirring occasionally. Once the solution is below 120 degrees Fahrenheit, add the preservative. Stir well. Pour into jars. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Cream

Weighing Emulsifying Wax

Weighing Stearic Acid

Weighing Beeswax

Weighing Cocoa Butter

Weighing Coconut Oil

Weighing Lanolin, Vitamin E, and Glycerin

Weighing Water

Heated Lotion

Mixing Lotion

Adding Optiphen

Pouring Lotion into Jars

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Huckleberry Soap – Day 2

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011
Yesterday I made a Huckleberry soap. Today I will be using the same recipe but with an increased percentage of the Huckleberry Fragrance Oil. The soap smells so wonderful I want to go find a berry patch and spend the day grazing. :-) Just be careful using this soap in bear country. You might lose it and before you know it, the bear will ask for a bath tub! Follow my advice and never give a bear a bar of your Huckleberry Soap. Come join me in the kitchen for some beary scrumptious fun! :oops: We had better get into the kitchen before I get anymore punny! 

This soap has a more significant yellow color to it than the soap we made yesterday did. I think I prefer the soap with the 1.5% Huckleberry Fragrance Oil usage rate because it smelled strongly but was most cost effective in using the fragrance oil. I did not notice a significant difference between the two soaps in their strength of the odor.

 

Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Water
Lye
Huckleberry Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Spoon
Soap Bucket
Pipettes
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
5 ounces Coconut Oil
5 ounces Olive Oil
6 ounces Water
2.2 ounces Lye
.4 ounces Huckleberry Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soy
141 grams Coconut Oil
141 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Water
62 grams Lye
11 grams Huckleberry Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
25% Hydrogenated Soy
20% Coconut Oil
20% Olive Oil
25% Water
9% Lye
2.5% Huckleberry Fragrance Oil

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until a light trace is achieved. Add the Huckleberry Fragrance Oil and mix well. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

My starting oil temperature was 140° F. My starting Lye Solution temperature was 180° F. It took me using the immersion blender 76 seconds to reach light trace. I gently stirred in the fragrance oil and poured the soap into the mold. I let the soap sit for 24 hours before removing from the mold and cutting the soap.

Taylor

Finished Soap

Heated Oils

Adding Lye Solution

Mixing Soap

Mixing Soap to Light Trace

Adding Fragrance Oil

Mixing in Fragrance Oil

Pouring Soap into Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Huckleberry Soap – Day 1

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011
The other day Tina asked me to make two soaps using our Huckleberry Fragrance Oil. She wanted me to record my temperatures, time it took to trace and which one I thought smelled better. I couldn’t wait to get started. I love Huckleberries. A local wood fired oven pizzeria has a dessert pizza has apples, cinnamon, marscapone (a soft Italian cheese used in sweet and savory dishes), a little bit of brown sugar and of course HUCKLEBERRIES! When huckleberries are in season, I can be found there with family and friends chatting over this fabulous dessert pizza. Come join me for this fabulous Huckleberry soap! 

Collect Needed Items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Water
Lye
Huckleberry Fragrance Oil
Equipment
Scale
Spoon
Soap Bucket
Pipettes
Mold

Recipe:

Recipe in Ounces
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
5 ounces Coconut Oil
5 ounces Olive Oil
6 ounces Water
2.2 ounces Lye
.28 ounces Huckleberry Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Grams
170 grams Hydrogenated Soy
141 grams Coconut Oil
141 grams Olive Oil
170 grams Water
62 grams Lye
8 grams Huckleberry Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
25% Hydrogenated Soy
20% Coconut Oil
20% Olive Oil
25% Water
9% Lye
1.5% Huckleberry Fragrance Oil

Weigh all of the oils into a microwave safe container. Heat gently until liquid. Add the lye to the water to for a lye solution. Mix the oils and lye solution and blend until a light trace is achieved. Add the Huckleberry Fragrance Oil and mix well. Pour into a mold and allow to sit for 24 hours. Cut the soap. Allow the soap to cure. Longer curing time will result in a harder bar. Enjoy!

My starting oil temperature was 110° F. My starting Lye Solution temperature was 180° F. It took me using the immersion blender 40 seconds to reach light trace. I gently stirred in the fragrance oil and poured the soap into the mold. I let the soap sit for 24 hours before removing from the mold and cutting the soap.

P.S. Should you ever come our way, I’ll point you to Jack’s Wood Fired Oven so that you, too, can enjoy a Huckleberry Dessert Pizza.
Taylor

Finished Soap

Weighing Fragrance Oil

Heated Oils

Adding Lye Solution

Mixing Lye and Oil Solutions

Mixing to Light Trace

Adding Huckleberry Fragrance Oil

Mixing in Fragrance Oil

Pouring Soap into Mold

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Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Sadie Keeps Growing!

Monday, June 20th, 2011
Can you believe that Sadie is now 10 weeks old? She has grown so much since we first got her and she still is small! When I last posted, Sadie was due to head to the veterinarian for her first check up and shots. I’m pleased to report that the veterinarian gave us a clean bill of health. Sadie was even a good girl and didn’t have a problem with the shots or the pill they gave her. She actually swallowed it by herself and the veterinarian’s assistant was very surprised by that. ;) I knew that we were raising a smart kitty!

Sadie is still very active in chasing feet, dogs or the cat, Leo, around the house. I think when Leo has to go for his check up this winter his veterinarian will be pleased that he has lost weight. He started jumping to the top of the cat condo to get away from Sadie, but now that only slightly slows her down. She just climbs the outside of the condo to catch him. I joked to Taylor that Leo is losing his belly fat and is well on the way to having abs of steel!

I thought you would like to see a comparison of Sadie from when we first got her to today. She still uses her first bed, but she now fills more than just a corner. :lol: She is continuing to grow at a rapid rate and now her eyes are more of a golden green color than the blue color she used to have. The coloring of her coat is also becoming more distinct with white and orange spots on her belly and a mottled black and orange colored back.

I hope you enjoy this great picture of Sadie!

Sadie in her bed at 10 weeks.

Sadie at 2 weeks.

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)

Lip Solutions: Using the Plate Test

Thursday, June 16th, 2011
Technically summertime is just around the corner, but I do feel that summer is here already. It isn’t just the warmer temperatures that make me to feel this way either, it’s my lip balm. :eek: My current favorite lip balm is easily applied with just a little body heat. In the cooler months this lip balm is great, however the summertime finds the lip balm melting in my pocket. Argh!

Today, I’m going to make a new batch of lip balm using our Lip Solutions and show you how to use the plate test to check your lip balm before filling your lip balm containers. A plate test can be used the check the firmness, flavor, or texture of a lip balm. We are going to use the plate test today to check the firmness of a lip solution after adding flavor, extracts, color and beeswax.

I was so excited that I got to play with our newest extracts for this little project! They don’t add any taste to the lip balm, but they do add some great skin conditioning benefits.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Soy Lip Solutions – Extra Firm
Grape Flavor Oil
Green Tea Extract
Sea Buckthorn Extract
Beeswax
Ruby Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble
Blue Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble
Equipment
Microwave safe container for weighing ingredients
Scale
Transfer Pipettes
Spoons
Containers for the finished products (I’m using the I’m using the White Bottom Twist Lip Balm Tubes with Purple Caps.)
Glass, Ceramic or Metal Plate
A Dry Erase or Wet Erase Marker for marking the plate

Recipe Total in the Final Product:

Recipe in ounces for 70 tubes
10.08 ounces Soy Lip Solutions – Extra Firm (1 jar)
0.56 ounces Grape Flavor Oil
0.21 ounces Green Tea Extract
0.21 ounces Sea Buckthorn Extract
1.0 ounces Beeswax
q.s. Ruby Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble*
q.s. Blue Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble*
Recipe in grams for 70 tubes
285.7 grams Soy Lip Solutions – Extra Firm (1 jar)
16 grams Grape Flavor Oil
6 grams Green Tea Extract
6 grams Sea Buckthorn Extract
28.4 grams Beeswax
q.s. Ruby Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble*
q.s. Blue Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble*
Recipe in Percentages
83.5% Soy Lip Solutions – Extra Firm (1 jar)
4.7% Grape Flavor Oil
1.8% Green Tea Extract
1.8% Sea Buckthorn Extract
8.2% Beeswax
q.s. Ruby Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble*
q.s. Blue Lip Balm Color, Oil Soluble*

* To color these lip balms, I used our Oil Soluble Lip Colors. I have the professional sizes of these colors in the kitchen and I used 2 drops from the yorker cap for each color to achieve the purple color. This color is light enough to not color the lips, but strong enough to tell someone that this is a grape lip balm.

Remove the lid from the jar of Lip Solutions. Microwave in short bursts until the Lip Solutions is completely melted. Once the Lip Solutions is melted, add the Grape Flavor, Green Tea Extract and Sea Buckthorn Extract. Stir until all of the additives have been incorporated. The lip balm will be very soft after the addition of the additives, so the plate test is very useful in determining when you have made a lip balm too soft or firm.

At this time, you can put put away the flavor and extracts since they will will not be needed anymore. This will conveniently give you more work room. ;) Grab your plate and drop 1 or 2 drops of melted Lip Solutions on to it. The lip balm will cool very quickly since the plate is cooler than the jar. After the lip balm completely cools on the pate, use your clean fingers to press and rub the lip balm. Once you have some lip balm on your finger, apply it to your lips. Now evaluate the lip balm. Ask yourself these questions.

  • Is the lip balm firm enough to the touch for my (or my customers) preferences? Or is it too soft?
  • Is the texture right or is it lacking?
  • How do my lips feel?
  • Is this flavor strong enough for what I wanted?
  • Is this lip balm sweet enough?
  • Do I need to add something to round this flavor?
  • Am I happy with the flavor that this has produced?
  • Am I happy with the overall product?

If you can answer these questions to your satisfaction, then you can fill your tubes. But what if you have a problem that you want to fix? Do you pitch your lip balm and start over? I don’t see many reasons that would prevent you from saving a lip balm. These are examples of things that you can do to fix a lip balm.

  • The lip balm is too soft.
    • Add more wax. Start with small increments like 1/4 to 1/2 ounce of Beeswax or 1/8 to 1/4 ounce of Carnauba and/or Candelilla Wax.
  • The lip balm is too hard.
    • Add more liquid oils. Start with small increments like 1/4 to 1/2 ounce of any oil of your choice. These oils can be the same oils that you already have in your formulation or you can add a new oil to the formulation.
  • The lip balm doesn’t have enough flavor.
  • The lip balm has too much flavor.
    • If there is too much flavor you may need to increase your batch size.

Now that I’ve thoroughly provoked those gears in your brain to turn, let’s backtrack to our Lip Solution. As you can see in the photos, this is now very soft and definitely not summer pocket worthy! I added 1/2 ounce of Beeswax to the Lip Solutions to help it become firmer. After stirring until the Beeswax was completely melted and incorporated into the Lip Solutions, I repeated the plate test. This time the lip balm was firmer, but it still wasn’t as firm as I would have liked it to be for summer weather.

Once again, I added 1/2 ounce of Beeswax to the Lip Solutions. After stirring until the Beeswax was completely melted and incorporated into the Lip Solutions, I repeated the plate test for the third time. This time the lip balm was much firmer and exactly the texture I wanted for a summer lip balm that could handle the hot weather.

Note: You may notice that I used a Dry-Erase marker on the glass plate to mark above each test. While I’d like to say that my memory is fully functional, I have to admit that sometimes my day is very fractured. :roll: (Ok, maybe most days.) This means that marking the samples prevents me from having to start over again or guessing. Testing always needs accurate notes to help you know which product you liked best!

I hope you find this information useful the next time you make lip balm. Who knows, you might be able to fix that next batch that doesn’t turn out just right! I’ll be sending 70 samples to shipping tomorrow, but you can start requesting your sample with your order today. :grin:

P.S. Did you know you can use the information in this post for making solid perfumes. You can even use our Lip Solutions for a solid perfume base. Cool!

Capping the finished lip balm.

Lip Solutions after being melted in the microwave.

Stirring the Lip Solutions after adding the additives.

Adding the Oil Soluble Lip Colors.

Mixing the colors into the Lip Solutions.

Colored Lip Solutions.

Placing a few drops on the plate.

Cooling lip balm.

Testing the lip balm.

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Rating: 5.0/5 (4 votes cast)

Margarita Lip Balm

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011
I am so excited to announce a new flavor we just released, Margarita Flavor Oil! These lip balm are definitely parties contained in a tube. This flavor is so incredibly similar to the drink, you might even fool a bartender! Come join me for this fun and party like flavor. 

This flavor oil is pre-sweetened so you do not need to sweeten it. This lip balm reminds me of hot summer nights that press against your skin with a refreshingly cool and salty drink in hand. It definitely brings to mind a good time that makes you come back for more. Come to the summer party, have a margarita and watch the sun go down. How perfect.

 

Collect Needed Materials

Ingredients
Shea Butter Lip Solutions
Margarita Flavor Oil
Equipment
Scale
Transfer Pipette
Containers for Lip Balm

Recipe:

Recipe in Grams
285.76 grams Shea Butter Lip Solutions
5.67 grams Margarita Flavor Oil
Recipe in Ounces
10.08 oz Shea Butter Lip Solutions
.2 oz Margarita Flavor Oil
Recipe in Percentages
98% Shea Butter Lip Solutions
2% Margarita Flavor Oil

Gently heat the jar of Shea Butter Lip Solution in a microwave until liquid. Add the Margarita Flavor Oil and stir well. Pour into a lip balm filling tray complete with tubes. Allow the solution to cool. Using a plastic putty knife, remove the top layer of solution. Remove tubes from tray and cap. Enjoy!

Taylor

Finished Lip Balm

Melted Lip Solution

Adding Flavor Oil

Stirring In Flavor Oil

Filling Lip Balm Tube Tray

Filled Lip Balm Tray

Filled Lip Balm Tray

Tray Scraped Off

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Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)