Archive for October, 2010

More New Products!

Friday, October 29th, 2010

It has been so exciting to watch the latest product releases! We have started our Limited Edition Collection after listening to your requests for some of our discontinued fragrances. We also released those adorable 1 oz jars that have been used as sample jars for our blog. Here is the list and my reviews of these new products!

Roseberry Fragrance, Limited Edition: Yum! I’m not a rose gal normally, but Roseberry appeals to my inner-teenager. This fun blend of roses, heather, wood, grapefruit and a touch of berries is an excellent reminder that while we are heading into late fall, spring will be here soon. I was amazed that this fragrance is one of the original five fragrances in our catalog. Can you believe it? I’m glad it is back (even for a limited time). Don’t miss out on your chance to make what was old a new touch of fun!

Snow Drops Fragrance Oil, Limited Edition: Snow Drops is a fantastic scent and I find that the biggest appeal from this fragrance is the outdoorsy smell. Who wouldn’t like to take a whiff and instantly be transported to a crisp winter day on any of the local skiing slopes! This scent even appeals to those lodge bunnies because it smells just like that winter mountain air. You don’t have to buy a plane ticket to visit the Utah slopes anymore, just take a sniff of Snow Drops! Remember, this is a limited edition!

1 oz Jar and Cap Set: If you have received any of our blog lotion samples lately, you probably got your sample in this fun 1 oz jar. We received so many requests for this jar that we had to share it with you!

We have more Limited Edition fragrances to be released, so here is a spoiler for you! The next to be released are Mulberry, Woodberry and Tangerine & Tulip. These are scheduled to be released by Monday. How cool is that?

Remember, Sunday is the last day for our October shipping special! If you can’t remember the details, I’ve placed them below for you to review.

Any orders placed during the month of October that have an item total of $100 or more will have a $10.00 shipping discount. Any orders that have an item total of $300 or more will have a $40.00 shipping discount. If your shipping is less than this amount discounted, you get FREE shipping! How cool is that?

This shipping special started at midnight today and will extend for the whole month of October! This shipping discount is automatically (Can I say auto-magically?) applied to all orders that qualify, so you don’t even have to remember a special code or phrase to enter.

Enjoy!

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The Importance of Labels, Part 3

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

Whether or not people end up buying your product, they will inevitably link their initial impression of your packaging to you and your brand. So the “net effect” we talked about earlier today is where you should really focus on your brand identity. Why is brand identity important? Your brand represents nothing short of control over how consumers think of you. Think of it in terms of that old saying about getting only one chance to make a first impression. Your customers will eventually form an opinion about your brand and your product based on their positive experience with using it. But you can’t afford to waste the opportunity to make a good impression on them before they try it for the first time.

So, lets back up a step and try to answer the question, what is brand identity? Brand identity is the consistent visual presentation of your brand or company. It often includes a wordmark, which is your brand name written out in a specific font, and a symbol, often called a “logo,” which is a graphic that somehow represents your brand. Brand identity can also include a consistent color scheme, type style, slogan, and even a specific shape of packaging, among other things. The sky is the limit on how structured you want the look of your brand to be. Just keep in mind a few things:

1. Does it match your “brand personality”? For example, a logo with loud colors and a playful, childish font would probably not fit the “personality” of a fine jewelry store. Likewise, a muted color scheme and very austere font would look out of place in the logo for most children’s clothing stores. Your company makes a certain product, usually for a certain audience, and has a certain atmosphere or feeling to it—its personality. In the end, your brand identity should reflect that.

eBay’s logo is a good example of a smart brand personality match. They are a forward-thinking, informal, online company that brings people all over the world together to do business in a relaxed, often playful atmosphere, and their lower-case, sans-serif, multicolored logo shows it.

2. Is your brand identity widely applicable? Will it fit just as snuggly on a post-it note as it will on a banner? Does it translate as well onto a rounded cosmetic container as it does on the flat side of a box? Does it function on multiple surfaces, like paper, vinyl, fabric, wood, metal, etc? Does it mean the same thing to various audiences?

Our very own logo at Majestic Mountain Sage was designed for use in a wide range of sizes and printing materials, shown here in large vinyl letters on our door, embroidered on a sweater, and printed on our packing tape.

3. Is it flexible and, if need be, expandable? Some brand identity is simply the name of a company and a unifying “feel” to all of that company’s products and packaging.

BeautyIn is a healthy snack and beverage company with a flexible brand identity. Even though their product packaging comes in a wide variety of colors and graphics, you can tell that they all come from the same company. By the way, I borrowed these images of BeautyIn’s products from a fantastic blog about packaging, www.thedieline.com. It’s great for inspiration!

Even if you’re using stock label designs, simply putting the name of your company in a consistent font and color on all of your packaging will give your products cohesion, and make your brand more inviting and memorable.

I hope you have found this topic interesting and thought provoking. Your company is worth special consideration in this area.

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The Importance of Labels, Part 2

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

There are lots of elements that make up a good label. And by “good,” I mean effective—at the end of the day a label isn’t worth very much if it doesn’t sell the product it’s stuck on. And I’m not just talking about the wording of the label. The most carefully worded label in the world isn’t going to help you sell anything if it’s not waterproof and it gets wet. Some labels need to stand up to rough handling and heavy usage. And especially in the soap and cosmetics industry, most labels also need to be oil-proof and light-fast.

So the material a label is printed on is part of what makes it a good label. We print our custom order labels on vinyl here at MMS—it’s oil- and waterproof, and it won’t peel up or rub off during shipping and handling, like paper labels can. We also print with the right kind of ink, which is another important element to good labels. Our ink is cured right inside the printer with ultraviolet light, which makes it light-fast and extremely durable, and gives it a lovely finish.

All right, now that we have the technical requirements out of the way, let’s talk about what’s on a label that makes it effective. The visual elements are easy to list off… there’s the shape of the label, its colors, the typefaces used, the graphic elements, the company brand, and, of course, the product information. After all, the reason we label our products is to deliver information to the consumer, right? Wrong! Well ok, that’s one of the reasons. But anyone who thinks that providing information is the sole purpose of a label, take a look at these three:

Which one would you be more likely to pick up at the grocery store or the farmers market? Now, can you tell me why? Does the typeface or the color mean that the product inside will be any better? Not likely. So why would you pick the one of the two on the bottom? I think it is because both combine all the visual elements we listed above to do the three things an effective label ought to do. It has a positive net effect, it tells a story, and it provides information.

What I’m calling the “net effect” can be summarized in the instantaneous emotional reaction a person has when they see your product for the first time. Shopping is emotionally driven. And that actually works to your advantage as a seller of fine, limited quantity, and custom made goods. Think about it: the 98¢ supermarket generic bar of soap will probably get a customer’s hands just as clean as your $4.50 bar. You need customers to feel good about spending that extra money on your product, even though you only have their attention for a second or two. They won’t register how they feel about the individual elements of your label, but the positive net effect of all those elements combined will bring them in for a closer look. Then your product’s own merit will sell itself.

All three lip balm labels are for the exact same product, but the labels on the bottom are more effective. Why are they more effective? They bring in attention and make the customer feel that your product is for them. The product will talk to the customer and say, “I belong with you. Buy me and take me home!”

How can you make your labels more effective and enticing to a customer?

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The Importance of Labels, Part 1

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

In addition to working full time in the graphics department here at Majestic Mountain Sage, I also work weekends at a “big-box” bookstore. Both for the discount as well as an easier ability to keep up on what’s new in books and music. I’ve realized something after working there for several years. You know that old saying “you can’t judge a book by its cover”? Well, it’s not true. You can judge a book by its cover, and people (especially booksellers!) do it all the time. Publishing companies actually budget tens of thousands of dollars every year just for awesome book cover designs, because they know that the right cover will reach out and grab you when you browse the bookstore shelves.

So, how do thousand-dollar book covers relate to making and selling soap? What does shelf appeal have to do with homemade cosmetics and gifts? It’s all about the packaging. Chances are, if you’re selling soap that you’ve made with care and attention to every detail, it’s because you know it works. If you enjoy giving away homemade lotion or lip balm to friends and family, it’s because you know it’s made from the finest ingredients possible. But how can you make sure that your customers, or your friends and family know that as well? Repeat the answer with me: it’s all about the packaging.

Many of you know, from selling at farmers’ markets and craft fairs, what it’s like to sit behind a table of products you’ve spent long hours creating… only to watch people walk past your booth with barely a glance down. You need something that will make every person who glances want to stop and pick up your soap. You need something that will grab people’s interest, and say all of the wonderful things you would say about your own products if you had a half-hour and you weren’t so dang modest. What is that something, you ask? Yep. You guessed it: it’s all about the packaging.

At first glance, it’s easy to underestimate the importance of packaging, especially here in America, where we throw so much of it away daily. But the emotional and psychological impact of packaging on consumers make it one of the most valuable tools for selling your product and your brand. Even handmade items that are given away as gifts are more meaningful (and appear much more valuable!) when the packaging is as lovely as the present inside.

As small business owners and hobby soap makers, custom printing directly on your plastic and paper packaging just isn’t an option financially. Which means you probably order bottles, jars, and tubes from your favorite supplier (I really hope it is us here at TheSage.com), and then complete the packaging with your own label. If you’re thinking, “Ew, custom labels look so tacky,” then you haven’t been introduced to the right labels. Our very own printer here at MMS makes labels that look every bit as professional as department store packaging, and they offer more possibilities for making every product you sell simply, beautifully, and distinctively yours.

So what makes a good label? I’d like to break it down in a few posts throughout this week, and Andee has helped us cook up a graphics department blog giveaway at the end. We’ll look at branding and design (love it or hate it, but you can’t escape it), examples of good and not-so-good labels, and even get your input as we entirely revamp our own custom label designs.

Stay tuned!

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Nutty Honey Lip Balm

Monday, October 25th, 2010
I’ve been in a lip balm making mood lately, so I sat down to browse through my drawers of butters and fixed oils for inspiration. I pulled ingredients that interested me out of the drawers, looked at the ingredients I had picked and then started working on a lip balm formulation containing these ingredients.

Here are some of the reasons I picked the ingredients I did.

Candelilla Wax = I haven’t made a lip balm with Candelilla Wax and I wanted to see how it turned out.
Tamanu Oil = I wanted to use the Tamanu Oil because I love the soft, dewy feel on my skin and the plumping appearance that it can give.
Cranberry Seed Oil = I chose Cranberry Seed Oil since it contains fair amounts of both Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids, naturally occurring tocopherols, and high unsaturated profile. (All of which is fantastic for helping skin stay moisturized.)
Castor Oil = I picked the Castor Oil to give the lip balm some gloss.
Rice Bran Oil = I wanted to make a lip balm that contained lip balm because I like the feel of it on my skin. (Massage therapists do too!)
Shea Oil = I selected the Shea Oil for the luxurious factor that it can contribute to a lip balm.
Green Tea Butter = I wanted to use the Green Tea Butter because I haven’t used it very often and I thought that it would be a fun ingredient to use.
Soy Butter = I don’t know anyone who likes grainy lip balms, so I added Soy Butter to help make sure I would have a smooth lip balm.
Cupuaçu Butter = I didn’t want to use Cocoa Butter in this lip balm and I had a jar of the Cupuaçu Butter that was calling my name ever so pleadingly.
Vitamin E Acetate = I added an antioxidant to this collection of oils to allow my lip balm to last longer.
Honey Flavor Oil = This flavor was picked to accent the nutty flavor of the lip balm.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Candelilla Wax
Tamanu Oil
Cranberry Seed Oil
Castor Oil
Rice Bran Oil
Shea Oil
Green Tea Butter
Soy Butter
Cupuaçu Butter
Vitamin E Acetate
Flavor of choice ( I used Honey Flavor Oil)
Equipment
Microwave safe container for weighing ingredients
Scale
Transfer Pipettes
Spoons
Containers for the finished products (I’m using the I’m using the 5 mL Baby Lip Balm Jars.)

Recipe:

Recipe in ounces for 50 tubes
1.53 ounces Candelilla Wax
0.51 ounces Tamanu Oil
0.51 ounces Cranberry Seed Oil
1.53 ounces Castor Oil
1.02 ounces Rice Bran Oil
1.02 ounces Shea Oil
1.53 ounces Green Tea Butter
1.02 ounces Soy Butter
1.53 ounces Cupuaçu Butter
0.1 ounces Vitamin E Acetate
0.2 ounces Honey Flavor
Recipe in grams for 50 tubes
43.5 grams Candelilla Wax
14.5 grams Tamanu Oil
14.5 grams Cranberry Seed Oil
43.5 grams Castor Oil
29 grams Rice Bran Oil
29 grams Shea Oil
43.5 grams Green Tea Butter
29 grams Soy Butter
43.5 grams Cupuaçu Butter
2.9 grams Vitamin E Acetate
5.8 grams Honey Flavor
Recipe in Percentages
15% Candelilla Wax
5% Tamanu Oil
5% Cranberry Seed Oil
15% Castor Oil
10% Rice Bran Oil
10% Shea Oil
15% Green Tea Butter
10% Soy Butter
15% Cupuaçu Butter

To be added after:

1% Vitamin E Acetate
2% Honey Flavor

Recipe in grams for twenty 5 mL jars
15 grams Candelilla Wax
5 grams Tamanu Oil
5 grams Cranberry Seed Oil
15 grams Castor Oil
10 grams Rice Bran Oil
10 grams Shea Oil
15 grams Green Tea Butter
10 grams Soy Butter
15 grams Cupuaçu Butter
1 grams Vitamin E Acetate
2 grams Honey Flavor

Weigh all ingredients except the Vitamin E Acetate and Honey Flavor into your microwave safe container. Microwave in short bursts until all ingredients are melted. The Candelilla Wax will take the most time to melt, but if you stir the lip balm after the other oils have been heated, it will melt quickly. Once the mixture is melted, add the Vitamin E Acetate and Honey Flavor. Stir until all of the flavor has been incorporated. Fill tubes or jars. Cool. Label.

Notes:
This lip balm has a strong nutty flavor due to the Tamanu Oil, Cranberry Seed Oil, and Cupuaçu Butter used in making the lip balm, but the taste was surprisingly nice once the Honey Flavor was added. This lip balm is semi-glossy without leaving a heavy gloss on the lips. I think this is a long-term moisture locking lip balm that is perfect for maintaining soft lips.

If you would rather use another flavor, I would recommend something that would pair well with the nutty flavor of the lip balm.

This recipe was a surprise to me, but I think I’ve found my new favorite autumn lip balm. I think you will enjoy it too!

A completely cooled lip balm.

Beginning to weigh the ingredients.

Almost all of the ingredients have been weighed.

All of the ingredients ready to be melted.

Completely melted lip balm.

Cooling lip balm after filling the jars.

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Swaps with The Sage

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

A complete collection of goodies from the 2010 Halloween Swap. Click for a larger picture.

Have you ever wanted to participate in a swap? Well, now you can because we just opened another swap over on The Sage Soapmaker’s Forum! Swaps on the forum are a fun way to try different products and learn about what you like or don’t like in a product. This is also a great way to learn about processes or ingredients you would like to try.

Our last swap was lots of fun! We just finished a Halloween themed swap that was called “Wicked & Ugly or Good & Beautiful Swap”. The swapped products were wonderful and excitedly received. As many of our swap participants have said, “It’s just like Christmas!”

Come on over to the forum and join the latest swap! This one is themed “Holiday Hostess Gift Swap”. The purpose of this swap is to share different product ideas that people can make as gifts for the hosts or hostesses of holiday parties that will be occurring during the holidays.

Some of the best things about participating in our swaps are:

  1. Participants receive a recipe book containing recipes from every participant who wanted to share their recipe.
  2. ALL participants get a teaser selection of goodies from MMS to use in various projects.
  3. You receive a package that is stuffed with wonderfully inspiring products that makes it feel like Christmas!
  4. You will get reviews about your products and great stories too!
  5. Fun is had by all!

Join the forum and our Holiday Hostess Gift Swap! We are looking forward to seeing you there!

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Soothing Sugar Scrub

Thursday, October 21st, 2010
There is nothing better than a exfoliant and soothing oils to make a spa day complete. This fantastic scrub is great with for the whole body. You could also use fine sugar and salt to make a scrub that is nice for the face. This scrub leaves the skin feeling refreshed and dewy without an oily feeling after. Soothing indeed!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Apricot Kernel Oil
Sweet Almond Oil
Rice Bran Oil
Jojoba Oil
Polysorbate 20
Chamomile Extract
Medium Bath Salt
Sugar
Fragrance (I used Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance)
Preservative (I used Liquid Germall Plus)
Equipment
Scale
Transfer Pipettes
Spoon
Containers for the finished products (I used the 2 ounce Low Profile Jars with Straight Black Lids.)
Recipe in ounces: (Makes 3.5 ounces)
0.53 ounces Apricot Kernel Oil
0.21 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
0.04 ounces Rice Bran Oil
0.04 ounces Jojoba Oil
0.71 ounces Polysorbate 20
0.04 ounces Chamomile Extract
0.35 ounces Medium Bath Salt
1.62 ounces Sugar
0.02 ounces Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance
0.02 ounces Liquid Germall Plus
Recipe in grams:
15 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
6 grams Sweet Almond Oil
1 grams Rice Bran Oil
1 grams Jojoba Oil
20 grams Polysorbate 20
1 grams Chamomile Extract
10 grams Medium Bath Salt
46 grams Sugar
0.5 grams Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance
0.5 grams Liquid Germall Plus
Recipe in Percentages:
15% Apricot Kernel Oil
6% Sweet Almond Oil
1% Rice Bran Oil
1% Jojoba Oil
20% Polysorbate 20
1% Chamomile Extract
10% Medium Bath Salt
46% Sugar

Added after the scrub is mixed:
0.5% Acai & Mangosteen Fragrance
0.5% Liquid Germall Plus

Weigh the liquid ingredients into the mixing container. With recipes that you weigh like this, I like to add my fragrance oil and preservative to the fixed oils before I add the salt and sugar. Now, add the salt and sugar and stir thoroughly. Fill containers with mixed scrub. Stir the scrub mixture frequently while filling the jars to keep an evenly filled jar.

This recipe filled one 2 ounce Low Profile Jar.

Notes:
This scrub does contain Polysorbate 20, which helps emulsify the oil and water. The scrub will turn a milky white color when water is applied and leave the skin exfoliated and lightly moisturized. This will help reduce oily residue in the shower or tub, but it will not completely prevent it. We still recommend having bath mats for fall protection.

I used these particular oils for their soothing feel on the skin. The Rice Bran and Jojoba in particular add a silky feeling to this scrub when using it.

Enjoy!

Completely mixed scrub on my fingers.

Liquid ingredients after weighing.

Adding the salt.

Adding the sugar.

Completely mixed scrub.

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Raspberry Vanilla Truffle Soap

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010
For me, Chocolate truffles are a rare treat, but they are some of my favorite candies. According to the dictionary, a chocolate truffle is a ball shaped candy made of soft chocolate and dusted with cocoa. One of my favorite chocolate truffles is a homemade Raspberry White Chocolate Truffle. Yum!

I had chunks left over after making the Raspberry Milk Soap and I didn’t know what I wanted to do with them other than use them! As I started thinking about what scents worked well with raspberries, I thought about the Raspberry White Chocolate Truffles we make occasionally at home. I decided that I wanted to make a batch of soap that used Cocoa Butter and was scented with Vanilla Cream.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Sweet Almond Oil
Cocoa Butter
Coconut Oil
Palm Oil
Shea Butter
Water
Sodium Hydroxide
Raspberry Milk Soap Shreds
Vanilla Cream Fragrance
Titanium Dioxide
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Mold
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 15 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding fragrance and Titanium Dioxide and mixing well: 30 seconds
Adding soap shreds and stirring until mixed: 60 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Soap Recipe in ounces:
8 oz Sweet Almond Oil
4 oz Cocoa Butter
8 oz Coconut Oil
8 oz Palm Oil
4 oz Shea Butter

10 oz Water
4.48 oz Sodium Hydroxide

13.74 oz Raspberry Milk Soap Shreds*
0.56 oz Vanilla Cream Fragrance
1 teaspoon Titanium Dioxide mixed with 2 Tablespoons of water

*Precise weight of the soap shreds is not necessary.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Weigh the Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil in a beaker and set aside. Mix Titanium Dioxide and water and set aside. Measure soap shreds into a small mixing container.

Combine oils and lye solution. Mix until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil and Titanium Dioxide Color Mix. Mix completely and then add the soap shreds. Stir well. Pour soap into the desired mold I used a different style of the Guerrilla Mold from Dirk’s post. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
These soaps are very adorable and fun to make. I might make this style of soap again for Christmas gifts since the coloring is very holiday spirited. This would be very fun to do with a mint scented soap or as a berries & cream soap.

I can’t stop my mind from plotting different soaps to make that look like this! What would you make?

Finished bar of soap.

Adding the lye solution to the melted oils.

Beginning to mix the oils and lye solution.

Mixing in the Titanium Dioxide.

Soap after it was poured into the mold.

A close up of the soap in the mold.

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Single Use Solid Massage Bars

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010
The holiday season is coming and sometimes chaos and stress can drive us up the wall. With all of this craziness going around, I think it is very important to remember ourselves. Don’t forget to take time to relax and relieve all of that tension. I formulated this massage bar as a way to pamper any stressed holiday host (or hostess).

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Grapeseed Oil
Mango Butter
Candelilla Wax
Sweet Almond Oil
Regular Cocoa Butter
Vanilla Cream Fragrance
Equipment
Microwave safe container for weighing ingredients
Scale
Transfer Pipettes
Spoons
Small candy molds

Recipe: (Makes 6.75 ounces)

Recipe in ounces
2.81 ounces Grapeseed Oil
0.71 ounces Mango Butter
1.06 ounces Candelilla Wax
1.06 ounces Sweet Almond Oil
1.06 ounces Regular Cocoa Butter
0.05 ounces Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil
Recipe in grams
80 grams Grapeseed Oil
20 grams Mango Butter
60 grams Candelilla Wax
30 grams Sweet Almond Oil
30 grams Regular Cocoa Butter
1.5 grams Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil
Recipe in Percentages
41.63% Grapeseed Oil
10.52% Mango Butter
15.70% Candelilla Wax
15.70% Sweet Almond Oil
15.70% Regular Cocoa Butter
0.74% Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil

Measure all your ingredients into a microwave safe container. Gently melt all ingredients. Add any desired fragrance, mix well and then pour into desired molds. I used small candy molds to make these individual hearts.

Notes:
If you desire colored massage bars, you can use a small amount of the Oil Soluble Lip Colors. You don’t want to use too much of these colors because you don’t want to color the skin!

This massage bar will smell like a vanilla chocolate truffle. Yum! Absolutely fantastic for after the shower or any other time. Make sure you choose a small candy mold that will be an excellent size for a one time use. These massage bars will need complete labeling or someone just might think that it is chocolate!

Enjoy!

Andee

Ingredients after weighing.

Cooling single use massage bars.

Completely cooled single use massage bars.

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New Product Releases!

Monday, October 18th, 2010

If you haven’t been watching the New Products section of the catalog, you are in for a treat. Earlier last week, we released flavors, containers, and new molds!

Here is a little review of the latest new products.

Butterscotch Flavor Oil: As one of the most requested flavors, this was also the hardest to make sure we had it right. I’m a butterscotch candy junkie anyway, but this flavor is perfectly butterscotch. I’ve had a hard time keeping my little tester to myself. This flavor is completely unisex. I can just imagine this flavor being used as party favors! Can’t you?

Pomegranate Flavor Oil: Pomegranates have been one of my favorite seasonal fruits since I was a little girl. Unfortunately, I’ve never been able to keep the pomegranate juice off the ceiling! (Whoops! Sorry Mom!) Pomegranates are typically a treat for me between Thanksgiving and Christmas but now with the new Pomegranate flavor, I can enjoy the taste of pomegranates all year round! I love this flavor and I think you will too.

Sugar Baby Flavor Oil: When I was able to test the Sugar Baby Flavor, I was surprised by the simple sweet flavor. This sweetener can accentuate any flavor without any additional nuances. Purely sugar, baby!

Big Lip Balm Tubes: Ever feel as if a regular lip balm tube is just too small? Try our new Big Lip Balm Tubes. These tubes have a collar twist mechanism which is very cool! The Big Lip Balm Tubes will hold 1/4 ounce, which is the same amount as one of the Size 33 Lip Balm Jars.

Bigger Lip Balm Tubes: Remember the glue sticks you can purchase for school kids? Now you can make lip balms, salves, lotion bars or other similar products. Our new Bigger Lip Balm Tubes hold 1/2 ounce of material. Wow! These tubes have a bottom twist mechanism just like our regular lip balm tubes.

Guest Celtic Flowers Mold: These Guest Celtic Flowers are great for cute little sample soaps or traveling soaps. Just the right size to take along with you for your trip and use your own soap!

Halloween Mold 1: While Halloween is just around the corner, this mold is just perfect to celebrate your inner Halloween spirit. Enjoy making a quick witch, cat and bats for great Halloween gifts.

Halloween Mold 2: This Halloween mold is a great companion mold for the Halloween Mold 1. Spiders, skeletons and R.I.P. gravestones are delightfully creepy enough to satisfy any Halloween junkie.

Honeybee Tray Mold: This mold is perfect for honey soaps and I’d love to see an Oatmeal, Milk and Honey soap made in this mold. Wouldn’t you?

Lily Pad Soap Mold: This adorable mold will be fun for any entomologist or just those who are entomologists at heart. I think this mold is a perfect reminder that spring will be coming around again.

You should try these products and let us know what you think!

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