Archive for August, 2010

Garam Masala in Cold Process Soap

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010
Today begins our fifth day of using kitchen spices in soap by using Garam Masala Powder, which contains cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, black pepper, and coriander.

Did you know that garam masala is Hindi for hot mixture? Garam actually refers to the intensity of the spices rather than heat like chili peppers are said to be “hot”. This is a blend of spices that are common in Indian and other South Asian cooking. Garam masala is typically used in curries and stews, but it has been used in other dishes and is only limited by the cook’s imagination.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
water
Garam Masala Powder
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding Garam Masala Powder and mixing well: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4 ounces Sunflower Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

1 teaspoon Garam Masala Powder

We are going to use the higher end of the water recommendations in the Lye Calculator so we can mix the garam masala powder in easily. We are also making this soap in dry weather so the soap will dry/cure quickly. If you are making this in a humid location, please use a dehumidifier to help dry out the soaps.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the garam masala powder. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915 as the mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
I didn’t have any idea of what color the finished garam masala soap would be and I decided I was just going to be surprised. Well, I can promise that I was surprised with the final appearance of the soap. When I first pulled the soap out of the mold, my first thought was “Oh no! I didn’t mean for that to happen!” My soap was a purplish-brown color on the outside. When the soap was cut, the inside had a light tan color. After 48 hours, the purplish-brown color spread to cover the whole soap. The soap does not have a scent now, but it did have a spicy scent after the garam masala was added and during the gel phase. I would recommend leaving 1 teaspoon per pound of fat as the maximum usage rate because I think this soap is pretty with this amount.

After looking at the finished soap, I think the best scents for this soap would be fruity or fall type scents like Berries & Twigs, Plumberry Spice, Wild Mint & Ivy, Autumn Afternoon and Oak Leaves & Acorns.

The Garam Masala soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I really want to hear your comments about this or any of the other soaps with kitchen spices. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Cut soap after 24 hours.

Garam Masala Powder.

Adding the lye to the water.

The lye and water need to be mixed together.

Stirring the lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the melted fixed oils.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Weather in Northern Utah

Monday, August 30th, 2010
Weather in Northern Utah has been very interesting today and I just had to share with you! This morning started out with a heavy cold rain and then the skies cleared to mostly blue skies. Within half an hour, the clouds would roll back over the skies and it would start raining again! So far, this pattern has been repeating itself all day. I got a chance to look outside this afternoon while the skies were clear and I couldn’t believe my eyes! There is snow on the peaks of the mountains and the clouds were clinging to the mountains were quite pretty. I had to grab the camera and take some pictures to share with you.

Both of these pictures were taken from our facility in Nibley. You can see the green fields and just how big our mountains are! The Wellsville Mountain Range is on the west side of Cache Valley and the Bear River Mountain Range is on the east side.

How has the weather been for you today? I hope you have enjoyed your day no matter the weather!

The Wellsville Mountains of the Wasatch Mountain Range.

Naomi Peak of the Bear River Mountain Range.

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Red Chili Powder in Cold Process Soap

Monday, August 30th, 2010
Today begins our fouth day of using kitchen spices in soap by using Red Chili Pepper Powder, which is simply powdered red chili peppers.

Chili powder is typically blended with other spices in Indian, Spanish, Caribbean and Tex-Mex dishes. Chili con carne, enchiladas, curries, spiced rice, and many other similar dishes are popular uses for chili powder.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
water
Red Chili Powder
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding Red Chili Powder and mixing well: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4 ounces Sunflower Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

1 teaspoon Red Chili Powder

We are going to use the higher end of the water recommendations in the Lye Calculator so we can mix the red chili powder in easily. We are also making this soap in dry weather so the soap will dry/cure quickly. If you are making this in a humid location, please use a dehumidifier to help dry out the soaps.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the red chili powder. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915 as the mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
I thought that the red chili powder would make a red-orange colored soap. I was right about the overall color, but I didn’t even think about the darker specks that appear in the final soap. The red chili powder did contribute a spicy scent to the soap after being added and during the gel phase. The soap does have a mild sweet spice scent now. It is not a strong scent and it should not interfere with any scent. I would recommend leaving 1 teaspoon as the maximum usage rate because I think this soap could possibly be irritating to the skin.

After looking at the finished soap, I think the best scents for this soap would be Orange, fruity or spicy scents like Apple Jack, Plumberry Spice, Bitter Orange Orchid or Mardi Gras.

The Red Chili Powder soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I really want to hear your comments about this or any of the other soaps with kitchen spices. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Here is where I generally use chili powder …….. CHILI!! Here is our favorite chili recipe.

Chili Recipe:
2 cups Red or Pinto Beans
1 teaspoon baking soda
Water
salt (If desired)
1 pound ground meat (Turkey, Bison, Beef, Chicken)
1 large onion
1 celery stick
1 quart Tomatoes (We like diced)
1 teaspoon Chili Powder
Cayenne Powder (Optional for more bite)

Soak 2 cups of red or pinto beans or some of each in water and 1 teaspoon of baking soda overnight. Drain water and rinse beans several times.

Cover with water and salt to taste and cook until done. Approximately 3-4 hours. While beans are cooking, cook 1 pound of burger with 1 large onion and 1 stick of chopped celery. When beans are done, pour off enough water that the beans are barely covered. With a potato masher, mash beans just a little to make the soup thicken up. Add 1 quart or 2 large cans of tomatoes (I like the diced ones) and 1 teaspoon of chili powder (or to taste). For a little nip, add just a bit of cayenne pepper. Cook until flavors are blended.

If you want more meat, you might have to add more tomatoes. I’ll usually add tomato juice.

Good chili is mostly just messing around with the basic recipe. Good luck!

Cut soap after 24 hours.

Red Chili Powder.

Adding the lye to the water.

The lye and water need to be mixed together.

Stirring the lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the melted fixed oils.

Mixing the lye solution and oils together.

Continuing to mix until light trace.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Curry Powder in Cold Process Soap

Friday, August 27th, 2010
Today begins our third day of using kitchen spices in soap by using curry powder, which is actually a blend of various spices. I was quite surprised when I learned that curry powder was a blend of spices as I had always thought that curry was a pepper like plant! This particular curry powder contains, turmeric, paprika, fenugreek, coriander, black pepper, cumin, ginger, celery seed, cloves, caraway, and cayenne.

I found the word curry is actually a Western term that was possibly derived the Tamil word “karai” which means gravy or sauce rather than a particular type of dish. Curry is a side dish that is served alongside a main dish of rice or bread. In India, curry dishes do not use the same spices and not all of the dishes are “spicy.” Outside of India, the tradition of keeping special blends of curry powder simply became uneconomical especially since access to fresh spices is more difficult and curry powder became increasingly standardized. I feel so enlightened now that I know more about curry powder and Indian cooking.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
water
Curry Powder
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding Curry Powder and mixing well: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4 ounces Sunflower Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

1 teaspoon Curry Powder

We are going to use the higher end of the water recommendations in the Lye Calculator so we can mix the curry powder in easily. We are also making this soap in dry weather so the soap will dry/cure quickly. If you are making this in a humid location, please use a dehumidifier to help dry out the soaps.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the curry powder. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915 as the mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
I had originally thought that the curry powder would make an orange colored soap and I was right, at least for the first 48 hours after cutting. Now the color has mellowed out and the overall color is a pale dirty orange with various orange and brown colored specks. The curry powder did contribute a spicy scent to the soap after being added and during the gel phase. The soap does have a mild sweet spice scent now. It is not a strong scent and it should not interfere with any scent. I would recommend leaving 1 teaspoon as the maximum usage rate because I think this soap could possibly be irritating to the skin.

After looking at the finished soap, I think the best scents for this soap would be Lemon, Lemongrass or spicy scents like Brown Sugar & Spice, Pumpkin Pie, Apple Jack, and Spiced Fig. The color should have more play in the final scent decision. Sandalwood, patchouly and musk scents would also work well with the coloring.

The Curry Powdersoap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I really want to hear your comments about this or any of the other soaps with kitchen spices. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Cut soap after 24 hours.

Curry Powder.

Adding the lye to the water.

The lye and water need to be mixed together.

Stirring the lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the melted fixed oils.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Dill in Cold Process Soap

Thursday, August 26th, 2010
Today begins our second day of using kitchen spices in soap by using dill weed, which is the leaves and stalks of the dill plant.

Dill is typically used as aromatic flavoring for pickles, butters, fish, and breads. Dill is a popular herb in the Baltic region of Europe and used in gravlax, borscht and other soups.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
water
Dill
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding Dill and mixing well: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4 ounces Sunflower Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

1 teaspoon Dill

We are going to use the higher end of the water recommendations in the Lye Calculator so we can mix the dill in easily. We are also making this soap in dry weather so the soap will dry/cure quickly. If you are making this in a humid location, please use a dehumidifier to help dry out the soaps.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the dill. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915 as the mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
I was originally skeptical about the addition of Dill to the soap since I have seen other green leaves, like peppermint leaves, turn a blackish brown in cold process soap. Imagine my surprise when I cut the soap after 24 hours the soap surrounding the dill had turned a bright neon green! 48 hours after cutting, the color has mellowed out and the dill is a yellow-green with a grey-green overall appearance. The dill did not contribute any scent to the soap at any time during the process. I would recommend leaving 1 teaspoon as the maximum usage rate because I think this soap does not need to look like it is growing spots!

After looking at the finished soap, I think the best scents for this soap would be either garden or herb-like scents to play off the speckled appearance and the fact that the additive is a common cooking herb. Several scents that I can think of off the top of my mind would be Lemon since lemons and dill are frequently paired together, Lemongrass, Basil, Black Pepper, Autumn Afternoon, Green Mango, Sweetgrass, or if you want a surprising twist then pair dill with Orange.

The Dill soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I really want to hear your comments about this or any of the other soaps with kitchen spices. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Cut soap after 24 hours.

Dill.

Adding the lye to the water.

The lye and water need to be mixed together.

Stirring the lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the melted fixed oils.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Kelp Powder in Cold Process Soap

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010
Today we are going to begin our 10 batches of cold process soap with kitchen spices by making soap with kelp powder.

Kelp powder is typically used as flavoring for soups and sushi in Oriental countries. Many people use it as an addition to dishes along with salt or in the place of salt and it has also been used as a mineral supplement. Now another use for kelp powder can be added to the long list of uses.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Hydrogenated Soy
Palm Kernel Oil
Sunflower Oil
Sodium Hydroxide
water
Kelp Powder
Equipment
Scale
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Rubbermaid Drawer Organizer #2915
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 15 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 90 seconds
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 10 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Adding Kelp Powder and mixing well: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
6 ounces Hydrogenated Soy
6 ounces Palm Kernel Oil
4 ounces Sunflower Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fl oz water

1 teaspoon Kelp Powder

We are going to use the higher end of the water recommendations in the Lye Calculator so we can mix the kelp powder in easily. We are also making this soap in dry weather so the soap will dry/cure quickly. If you are making this in a humid location, please use a dehumidifier to help dry out the soaps.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Upon light trace, add the kelp powder. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915 as the mold. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
I had originally thought that adding the kelp powder would make this soap more green than its actual final appearance. This soap has small grey-brown flecks and is grey-green in overall color. There is not any scent to this soap from the kelp powder after the soap has dried. There is a fish-like odor after the kelp powder has been added and while the soap goes through the gel phase. I would recommend a usage rate of up to 2 teaspoons per pound of fats. However I am reluctant to use the 2 teaspoons first because I am worried that this particular usage rate will leave a lingering fish-like odor.

After looking at the finished soap, I think the best scents for this soap would be either earthy scents to play off the coloration which seems to be a camouflage color or ocean type scents to play off the fact that the additive is kelp.

The Kelp Powder soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders. I really want to hear your comments about this or any of the other soaps with kitchen spices. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one and if we have any samples we will send them to you.

Cut soap after 24 hours.

Kelp Powder.

Adding the lye to the water.

The lye and water need to be mixed together.

Stirring the lye solution.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Kitchen Spices in Cold Process Soap

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010

Before our move I purchased a few different kitchen spices and herbs to test in cold process soap. Ok, I purchased 10 total spices for testing purposes and I promise these were purchased in small quantities! I haven’t been able to get around to testing these spices until recently. You may be asking which spices I have in my collection, so I have included a list of the spices I have.

Cayenne Pepper Powder
Coriander Seed Powder
Curry Powder
Dill Weed
Garam Masala Powder (This particular powder contains: Cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, black pepper, coriander.)
Kelp Power
Paprika
Red Chili Powder
Turmric Powder
Yellow Mustard Powder

Now I have made 10 test batches with the these ingredients that I had and I’m excited to share the results with you! We will start tomorrow with these fun experiments of mine by using Kelp Powder as our first soap.

Have you used different spices or herbs in your soap before? If so, what did you use? If not, what would you like to use?

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Grease Monkey Melt & Pour Soap

Monday, August 23rd, 2010



I love grease monkey soaps. I really like to get into my gardening or other messy jobs. I then have some serious clean up. A grease monkey soap does the job perfectly. I have an overwhelming stash of melt and pour soap and I wondered if I could make a melt and pour grease monkey soap. So I headed to the kitchen for some testing.

Here is the equipment you will need for this recipe.

Equipment
Scale
Microwave Safe Container
Spoons
Molds for soap

Here are the ingredients you will need for this recipe.

Ingredients
Melt and Pour Soap
Pumice, Fine
Ground Vanilla Bean Specks

Here is the recipe in ounces.

Ingredients
16 oz Melt and Pour Soap
.66 oz Pumice, Fine
.02 Ground Vanilla Bean Specks

Gently melt the soap until liquid. Once liquid add the Ground Vanilla Bean Specks. Allow the soap to cool until more viscous. Add the pumice and stir well. Pour the viscous soap into mold and allow to cool. Remove from mold and use.

In my first test, I only added .22 oz of Pumice. My soap was also very hot. My pumice sank to the bottom of my mold (the top of my soap), then cooled. I wanted a soap that had pumice through out the bar and as I looked at my bar, I decided I wanted more pumice. I multiplied my pumice by three and I allowed my soap to cool more before adding my pumice and pouring. Down at the bottom you can see the comparison of these soaps. The one on the right is the desired soap. I grabbed a bar and gave my hands a good scrub down to test. It worked great! So simple to make and exactly what the mechanic ordered.

Finished Soap

Finished Soap

Liquid Soap

Liquid Soap

Adding Vanilla

Adding Vanilla

Adding Pumice

Adding Pumice

Stirring in Pumice

Stirring in Pumice

Mixed Soap

Mixed Soap

Soap Comparison

Soap Comparison

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

Grape Lime Rickey Soap

Friday, August 20th, 2010
Yesterday I showed you how to make a Grape Lime Rickey. Now I’ll show you how to make a refreshing bar of soap to pair perfectly with the Grape Lime Rickey.

This soap will be a swirled soap and very easy to make. I will start mixing the larger batch that is lime scented first and then mix the smaller grape scented batch.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Coconut Oil
Sweet Almond Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Distilled Water
Lye (sodium hydroxide)
Lime Essential Oil
Lemongrass Essential Oil
Juicy Grape Fragrance Oil
Mint Green Dry Color
Lavender Fields Dry Color
Liquid Glycerin
Equipment
Scale
2 Gallon Soap Bucket
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Soap Mold
Glass Beakers
Immersion Blender
Time spent:
Weighing time: 12 minutes
Adding lye to water: 35 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 5 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 20 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 5 minutes
Pour into mold: 90 seconds
Swirling colored soap: 60 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:

Lime Batch:
20 oz wt Coconut Oil
20 oz wt Sweet Almond Oil
20 oz wt Palm Kernel Oil
20 oz wt Hydrogenated Soybean Oil

30 fl oz Water
11.8 oz wt Lye (sodium hydroxide)

0.6 oz wt Lime Essential Oil
0.6 oz wt Lemongrass Essential Oil

2 Tablespoons Mint Green Dry Color Premixed in Liquid Glycerin

Grape Batch:
4 oz wt Coconut Oil
4 oz wt Sweet Almond Oil
4 oz wt Palm Kernel Oil
4 oz wt Hydrogenated Soybean Oil

6 fl oz Water
2.36 oz wt Lye (sodium hydroxide)

0.28 oz wt Juicy Grape Fragrance Oil

1 Tablespoons Lavender Fields Dry Color Premixed in Liquid Glycerin

Weigh the Lime Essential Oil and Lemongrass Essential Oil into a small beaker and set aside. Weigh the Juicy Grape Fragrance Oil into another small beaker and set aside as well.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm the fixed oils on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well. Repeat for the smaller, Grape-scented batch.

Combine the fixed oils and lye solution for the large batch. Stir until thin trace and then add the essential oils and Mint Green color. Blend to mix well and set aside and then begin mixing the small batch. When the small batch reaches thin trace, add the Juicy Grape Fragrance and Lavender Fields color. Mix until it is thicker, about the consistency of unwhipped whipping cream. Rinse your blender and go back to blending the larger green batch until it has reached the unwhipped whipping cream state as well. Pour the lime scented batch into the mold.

Once all the lime scented green soap is in the mold, I added the grape scented purple soap pouring in random areas. I then used a straw and not only swirled through the mold but also swirled up and down. The up and down action has the straw mixing across the top and dipping down to the bottom in a circular motion like whipping pancake batter with a balloon whisk in the kitchen.

The soap should appear somewhat colored on the top. Allow to rest. You can see this great picture of the soap going through gel phase. Try very hard not to move the soap while it is gel phase, you may lose all of your beautiful swirls.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
After I cut this soap, I decided that I wanted a stronger purple color next time I make the soap. I would recommend using the just the dry Lavender Fields colorant and adding it when beginning to mix the lye solution and fixed oils together. I might also increase the purple soap batch size by a pound and decrease the green batch by the same amount to allow for more purple. I also might make a scent blend to use instead of scenting the two colors differently.

Immediately after cutting, this soap smells like a rotten lime. Don’t worry! After about 24 hours of cure time the soap will smell just like a grape lime rickey.

These Grape Lime Rickey soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders.

I really want to hear your comments about this soap. I hope that anyone wanting a sample soap will request one.

Andee

Finished soap.

Fixed oils ready to be melted.

Melted fixed oils.

Adding the Sodium Hydroxide to the water.

Mixing the lye solution.

Adding the lye solution to the fixed oils.

Blending the lye solution and fixed oils together.

Raw soap after adding the Mint Green color.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Grape Lime Rickeys

Thursday, August 19th, 2010
Yesterday I showed you the Lime Zest soap and I promised that I would show you what I make with the juice from the limes. As a little girl I remember our family making grape lime rickeys during the hot days of summer. This drink is a wonderfully cool refreshment that anyone will enjoy!

This recipe can be vague and will depend on different tastes. I have found that adults enjoy more lime in their grape lime rickey while children prefer more grape syrup.

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Ice
Lemon-Lime Soda
Limes (I’m using the zested limes from yesterday)
Syrup (I’m using Grape Syrup)
Equipment
Drinking glass
Straw
Spoon, optional
A Sharp Knife

Cut a lime in half and squeeze one or both halves of the lime into the empty drinking glass. Dispose of the squeezed limes however you desire. Fill the drinking glass with the desired amount of ice. Now pour the soda over the ice. I used one can of Sprite Zero for this glass. Add a splash of grape syrup. I typically use between 1 – 4 tablespoons of grape syrup for a 12 fl oz can of soda. Stir well with either a spoon or straw. If you desire, cut a thin slice of lime for garnishment and then serve.

Note:
With the recent changes in low-calorie beverages, you can enjoy this drink without feeling like you are drinking straight sugar syrup. Sprite Zero and Diet 7up both are excellent low calorie choices that keep the great taste. If you desire, you can also use Club Soda instead of the Lemon-Lime soda.

Enjoy because I know I will!

Stay tuned tomorrow to see how we make this fun drink into a soap!

Collect needed items.

Cut a lime in half.

(more…)

VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)