Scenting the Learning Curve Lotion


As many of you know, I recently made a very large batch of lotion. Okay, okay, I’ll be honest, I made an enormous batch of lotion. I did preserve my lotion however, I did not fragrance it. (Probably a good thing because My immersion blender is considering retirement.) One giant batch of lotion can make a variety of scented batches of lotion, so, I wanted to show everyone how to divide a large batch into smaller ones for scenting purposes.

First, I will scoop out 50 oz of lotion into my mixing container. I lined a beaker with a plastic bag so; A) I would have less clean up, and  B) It allows me to make sure everything has been mixed properly. I chose the 50 oz size because it is a little more reasonable than 500 oz. I’ll be making 10 batches. Yea! Once I select my fragrance I will decide upon a usage rate and then measure out my fragrance.  I prefer a moderate usage rate for lotions. For my 50 oz batches I will need to calculate how much fragrance to use for each scent. If unsure about usage rates, check with the Fragrance Calculator for verification. I will then knead my fragrance (and color) into my lotion. If using a rigid container make sure the sides and bottom have been scraped. You want a well mixed solution. Once the lotion has been completely mixed the lotion can then be dispensed into containers. I am using 1 fl oz jars.

I will be scenting with a blend that was just developed and 9 more fragrances from the catalog. The blend is very floral, but it is tugging at the heart strings of some of our most die hard fruit lovers. The blend is jasmine, lily, lavender, rose, violet, apple, raspberry musk that is well rounded with a warm vanilla, very sweet and innocent. I blended my fragrance mixture into a bottle so I could ensure that they were well mixed before adding them to my lotion.

Blend
9 parts Hydrogen Fragrance Oil
6 parts Jasmine Fragrance Oil
10 parts Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil

I’m also making 50 oz batches of lotion in these scents:

Rosalie

Emmett

Volturi

The Meadow

Forks

Jacob

Green Mango

Coconut Milk

Dragon Fruit

I wanted to make samples of Alice and Jasper but Andee just made samples in our Body Butter Base and our Head to Toe Cream. If you would like a lotion sample, in any of these specific fragrances, place a note in the comments field of your order. If we have any available we will put one in your order for you. All of my samples will be in the shipping department by this afternoon.Taylor

Preparing to weigh and scent the lotion
Preparing to weigh and scent the lotion
Weighing the lotion
Weighing the lotion
Fragrancing Lotion
Fragrancing Lotion
Mixing Lotion
Mixing Lotion

Finished lotion ready for containers
Finished lotion ready for containers
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Learning Curve Lotion

3.89 Gallons of Lotion
3.89 Gallons of Lotion

This recipe is the lotion recipe I described yesterday in my conversion disaster. I promise I am giving you a smaller batch than I made originally. This lotion is a thicker lotion and very creamy when being applied. When finished applying, this lotion has a fabulous silky finish. I hope everyone gets a chance to try this lotion. It is worth it.

Equipment
Microwave Safe Container
Immersion Blender
Transfer Pipettes
Scale
Spoon (I prefer a rubber scraper)
Containers for finished product

These are the ingredients that you will need for this recipe.

Ingredients
Glycerin
Stearic Acid
Emulsifying Wax
Mango Oil
Avocado Oil
Apricot Kernel Oil
Golden Jojoba Oil
Shea Oil
Sunflower Oil
Water, Reverse Osmosis
Liquid Germall Plus

Here is the recipe in percentages. This will allow you to formulate the recipe to fit your needs.

Recipe in Percentages
1% Glycerin
2% Stearic Acid
4.2% Emulsifying Wax
1.4% Mango Oil
3.2% Avocado Oil
3.8% Apricot Kernel Oil
2% Golden Jojoba Oil
1% Shea Oil
3.2% Sunflower Oil
77.6% Water, Reverse Osmosis
.5% Liquid Germall Plus

Here is the recipe. It will make a batch total of 500 grams.

Recipe for 500 Grams
5 grams Glycerin
10 grams Stearic Acid
21 grams Emulsifying Wax
7 grams Mango Oil
16 grams Avocado Oil
19 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
10 grams Golden Jojoba Oil
5 grams Shea Oil
16 grams Sunflower Oil
388 grams Water, Reverse Osmosis
2.5 grams Liquid Germall Plus

Weigh all of the ingredients except Liquid Germall Plus into a microwaveable container. Heat until all of the ingredients have melted. Using an immersion blender, mix until blended. Allow the solution to cool to 120 degrees Fahrenheit before adding the Liquid Germall Plus. Stir occasionally while you are waiting for the mixture to cool. You do not want your lotion to separate. If you wish to add any fragrances or color, now would be the time. Mix the preservative into the lotion until well blended. Allow the lotion to cool to room temperature. You may now put the lotion into containers. The 500 gram batch is about 16 fl oz so you can make four 4 fl oz bottles, two 8 fl oz bottles or any variation you desire. Enjoy!

Taylor

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Whoops! Conversion Catastrophe

WARNING: Laughing may ensue!

Monday, I received a lotion recipe to test from one of the gals in technical support. The original recipe was in grams and made approximately 500 grams of lotion. My first ingredient (which I later ended up omitting) required 1.25 grams of citric. I thought, I can’t weigh 1.25 grams. My scale would only read 1.2 grams. “Well, that is accurate I thought,” sarcastically. Why don’t I just convert my unit of measure from grams to ounces, my scale CAN weigh 1.25 ounces.

I am sure many of you are sitting at your screens laughing, because, you KNOW what is coming. So, I proceeded to weigh out all of my ingredients except for my citric which started this entire conversion disaster. I ended up making 3.89 gallons of lotion. That fills our twenty-five pound buckets so close to the rim there is less than half of an inch before it spills over. My immersion blender is very tired and in need of a holiday. Poor thing. Due to my test kitchen disaster, I wanted to help everyone with increasing their test batches so they are able to use the scales they have available without making enough product to last their grandchildren’s life time.

What I should have done, instead of changing my unit of measure, is move my decimal point to the right one increment or multiplied my particular batch by two. I could have corrected my recipe prior to heading to the kitchen as well. The test batch would have been perfectly fine had I followed the original recipe after I crossed out the citric. So much for a small test batch. I must admit, this lotion is fabulous, it is just a little overwhelming in size. It is probably a very good thing I did not scent it. Now I at least get to have some fun in that area!

Taylor

3.89 Gallons of Lotion
3.89 Gallons of Lotion
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Stephanie’s French Green Clay Soap

Clay soaps are wonderful and have been described as having a silky feel. This soap is no exception with LOTS of silky lather. Don’t pass up this recipe just because it has a high percentage of high lathering oils. This isn’t a drying soap and it just might give you a new addiction!

After looking at this recipe for several weeks, I finally decided to track down my jar of French Green Clay so I could make this soap. This recipe is fantastic and definitely worth tracking down some clay. Now I’m asking myself, “Why did I wait?”

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Aloe Butter
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Palm Kernel Oil
Shea Butter, Refined
Water (I use Reverse Osmosis Water)
Lye (sodium hydroxide)
French Green Clay
Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil
Orange Essential, Brazil
Equipment
Scale
1 Gallon Soap Bucket
Soap Spoon
Gloves
2 Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915
Glass Beakers
Immersion Blender
Small Tea Plate
Time spent:Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 25 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 4 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 20 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 5 minutes
Pour into mold: 45 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces: (Makes a 2 pound batch)
2.4 oz Aloe Butter
4.8 oz Coconut Oil
13.6 oz Olive Oil
8.8 oz Palm Kernel Oil
2.4 oz Shea Butter, Refined

12 fl oz Water (I use Reverse Osmosis Water)
4.61 oz Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)

2 Tablespoons French Green Clay

0.15 oz Cedarwood Virginia Essential Oil
0.35 oz Orange Essential, Brazil

Measure the clay onto the small tea plate and set aside.

Weigh the essential oils into a small beaker and set aside.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Once the soap has reached thin trace, remove a small portion and add the clay to the removed soap and mix until any clumps of clay have been eliminated. Pour this clay portion of soap back into the bucket of soap and mix well. Add the essential oils. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Rubbermaid Drawer Organizers #2915. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
This soap is very hard so don’t leave this soap too long before cutting into bars or you will not be able to slice the soap easily.

What kind of soap would you make with clay?

Curious about kitchen spices or herbs in cold process soap? Vote now in our poll for future blog posts! The poll can be found on the right side of the screen between the Join In and Follow us on Twitter sections. Every vote counts! You can choose up to five answers if there are multiple spices or herbs you would like to see!

Andee

Finished bars of soap.
The essential oil blend and clay are ready to go.
The fixed oils have been weighed.
Mixing the lye solution.
Adding the lye solution to the melted fixed oils.

Mixing to a light trace.

Continue reading

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Raspberry Salt Scrub

I love scrubs; salt, sugar, etc. I think they are great. I am always trying one new scrub or another. Here is a fantastic recipe we just tested. I hope you try it and tell me what you think.

Equipment
Bowl
Spoon
Scale
Transfer Pipettes
Containers for Finished Product

Here are the ingredients you will need for this recipe.

Ingredients
Raspberry Seed Oil
Grapeseed Oil
Polysorbate 20
Squalane
Vitamin E Acetate
Salt, Either Dead Sea or Medium Bath (I used Dead Sea Salt, Fine)
Green Mango Fragrance Oil
Liquid Germall Plus

Here is the recipe in percentages. This will allow you to make batches that are the perfect size for you.

Recipe In Percentages
8% Raspberry Seed Oil
17% Grapeseed Oil
3% Polysorbate 20
1% Squalane
1% Vitamin E Acetate
70% Salt, Either Dead Sea or Medium Bath (I used Dead Sea Salt, Fine)
.25% Green Melon
.2% Liquid Germall Plus

Here is the recipe I used and photographed. This is a 100 gram batch.

Recipe In Grams
8 grams Raspberry Seed Oil
17 grams Grapeseed Oil
3 grams Polysorbate 20
1 grams Squalane
1 grams Vitamin E Acetate
70 grams Salt, Either Dead Sea or Medium Bath (I used Dead Sea Salt, Fine)
.25 grams Green Melon
.2 grams Liquid Germall Plus

Mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl. Add the fragrance and Liquid Germall Plus last. Stir well. Once the ingredients have been blended well, scoop into containers for use. Enjoy this fabulous scrub!

Taylor

Finished Scrub
Collecting Ingredients
Measuring Raspberry Seed Oil
Adding Grapeseed
Adding Salt
Scrub Ready to be Mixed

Closed Scrub
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A Little Critter Hanging Out at MMS

I love living and working in Northern Utah. Every day can be a visual treat just during the time spent traveling to and from work. The other day was no exception and I didn’t even have to leave work to fill my cute critter quota of the day. (Whew! That’s a mouthful.)

As we were leaving after work, a rat was spotted next to a car. When we finally checked it out, the rat turned out to be a muskrat. This cute guy was just hanging out under Taylor’s car and enjoying the shade.

I had to scramble back inside to grab the camera because this little muskrat was just too cute to pass up the opportunity to capture some pictures. The funny thing was that as soon as we started taking pictures of the muskrat, he posed for us! One paw on the tire had us laughing so hard that our sides hurt.

All sorts of cute critters can be found around Cache Valley such as marmots (typically the Yellow-Bellied), mule deer (typically Rocky Mountain), skunks, various marsh birds, hawks, eagles, falcons, cattle, horses, and many more!

Are there cute critters that hang out where you live or work? If so, what kinds of cute critters do you see?

Click on picture to enlarge.

Click on picture to enlarge.
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Fractionation in Palm Oil

Palm Oil. The lovely beast that it is. Since it is July I thought we should cover how to work with this oil since it can cause a few problems for soap makers.

When you open your pail does it look like this?

Photo #1
Let’s take a closer peak.

Photo #2
Photo #2
What if we take a spoonful to get a better idea?

Photo #3
If we pour some in a beaker, does it look like this?

Photo #4

All of these pictures make look familiar if you A) live in a warm/hot location or B) order palm oil during the summer.

Palm oil easily fractionates. This fractionation can cause soft soaps and hard soaps from the same pail but different batches. The fractionation can also cause premature oxidation in your soaps, often called DOS – Dreaded Orange Spots.

So, what is a good soapmaker to do? Heat, baby, heat!

Melt the WHOLE pail of palm oil. Small pails like the 5 lb can be done in most microwaves. 10 lb pails can be done in some larger microwaves. The 25 lb needs to be done on the stove. The stove can be inside or outside. Don’t forget those camping gear items. We don’t need to heat the inside anymore than necessary.

Once the whole pail has been heated pour the palm oil into smaller amounts or into shallow pans. We want to cool the palm oil quickly. If I am heating a large pail, something like 25 lbs, then I don’t always have the space to pour into shallow jelly roll pans (think what most call a cookie sheet).

I then pour into small storage containers or zipper bags BY WEIGHT. If my batch typically uses 4 oz, then I make a lot of 4 oz size bags. If my batches are looking bigger, then I might pour into 1 lb sizes. I always use my scale and tare the bags/containers so the weight is just the palm oil. LABEL! LABEL! LABEL! If you don’t label with the product name, weight, date and lot number then you won’t know what it is later. We don’t want mystery oils in the pantry or soap cupboard.

You can refrigerate or freeze the palm oil once it has cooled. Both methods will help prevent oxidation from taking your palm oil early. We know this fractionation issue can be a bit difficult to work with, but palm oil is well worth the effort. If you have any questions about this issue, please let us know.

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Lemon Zest Soap

I love citrus scented soaps and one can typically be found at my kitchen sink. I was making lemonade the other day and zippy, refreshing scent of lemons reminded me to think about making soap again. Then I started wondering if I could make a lemon soap and include the fresh lemon zest in my soap.

Today, I’m going to show that it is possible to using lemon zest!

Collect needed items:

Ingredients
Palm Kernel Oil
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Grapeseed Oil
Distilled Water
Lye (sodium hydroxide)
Lemongrass Essential Oil
Lemon Essential Oil, USA
Lemon Zest from 3 Lemons
Equipment
Scale
2 Gallon Soap Bucket
Soap Spoon
Gloves
Guerrilla Soap Mold
Glass Beakers
Immersion Blender
Time spent:Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 25 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 4 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 20 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 5 minutes
Pour into mold: 45 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours
Recipe in ounces:
16 ounces wt Palm Kernel Oil
16 oz wt Hydrogenated Soybean Oil (shortening)
16 ounces wt Coconut Oil
8 ounces wt Grapeseed Oil

21 fl oz Water (I used Reverse Osmosis Water)
8.38 ounces wt Sodium Hydroxide

0.5 oz wt Lemongrass Essential Oil
0.5 oz wt Lemon Essential Oil, USA

1.91 oz wt Lemon Zest (Zest from 3 Lemons, does not have to be exact)

Zest lemons. I used a fine Microplane / Zester to zest the lemon. Set aside.

Weigh the essential oils into a small beaker and set aside.

Measure fixed oils on your scale. Add lemon zest to fixed oils then warm on the stove or in the microwave. I melted the oils in the microwave. Add sodium hydroxide to the water. Mix well.

Combine oils and lye solution. Stir until thin trace. Don’t be alarmed when the soap turns a vibrant neon orange when beginning to mix the oils and lye solution together. Upon light trace, add the essential oils. Stir well. Pour soap into molds. I used the Guerrilla Mold from Dirk’s post. Allow to sit until soap is firm.

The next morning cut into bars. Stack to allow good air circulation. Allow to cure for several days before using. Longer curing will result in a harder bar.

Notes:
I added the lemon zest to the oils before melting the oils to allow some of the lemon oil in the zest to infuse in the oils. This allowed a nice triple touch of lemon in the final soap.

As I was beginning to mix the lye solution and oils together and the mixture turned a bright orange, I was panicked. Oh, no! I continued to mix and while the color stayed bright, the soap behaved just like any other 5 lb batch I’ve made before. I poured the soap in the mold, covered it and then left it until the next day when I could cut it.

After cutting the soap, I took a small end piece and washed my hands with it. Oh, my! The soap had the best lemon scent as well as excellent lather. The zest was not noticeable in the finished soap as it has been broken down during the saponification process.

What can you do with the juice from the lemons that have been zested? Don’t add the juice to your soap because it can cause havoc with the saponification process. Instead, use the lemon juice to marinate a chicken, make lemonade, or bake lemon bars.

The Lemon Zest soap samples have been sent to the Shipping Department to send out in orders.

Try this recipe and tell me what you think! What other citrus fruits would you try?

Curious about kitchen spices or herbs in cold process soap? Vote now in our poll for future blog posts! The poll can be found on the right side of the screen between the Join In and Follow us on Twitter sections. Every vote counts! You can choose up to five answers if there are multiple spices or herbs you would like to see!

Andee

Finished soap.

Three zested lemons.
Adding lemon zest to oils before melting.
Partially melted oils.
Melted oils with floating lemon zest.
Adding the lye solution to the melted oils.

Beginning to mix the lye solution and oils together.
Almost to a light trace.
Soap in the mold.
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Vanilla Oleoresin Soaps Evaluations

Soaps after being cut.
Last week we made three test batches of cold process soap with Vanilla Oleoresin. Now it is time for our evaluations.

All three batches have a very faint baked vanilla odor that is hard to smell when the soap is dry and the scent is just a little stronger when the soap is wet. The scent does not vary much between usage rates.

My overall opinion is that if you are wanting a barely there vanilla scent, then you can use the Vanilla Oleoresin. If you are wanting a stronger Vanilla scent that when sniffed shouts, “I’m Vanilla!” I would recommend using Vanilla Cream Fragrance Oil to meet the needs of a stronger scent.

So … our summary is not a failure, but not desired either.

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New Fragrance Releases

We are continuing to add new products to our catalog. It has been a challenge to keep these wonderful surprises a secret. I hope you enjoy these new products!

Here is a little review of the latest new products.

Rosalie Fragrance Oil:
Every time I smell Rosalie, I am continually surprised and delighted. It reminds me of Parma Violets which I get at our local London Market. Rosalie is very sweet but has a hint of spice that makes this fragrance fun and playful. A fantastic scent and a must try!

Emmett Fragrance Oil:
Oh, where do I begin? This fragrance makes me think of a man who is wearing a blend of bay, rum and lime. Now, make this guy work out a little bit and add a slight amount of sweet sweat. As I described this to another gal in the office I said “It makes me think of a sweaty sweetie… Wow!” I am definitely making my boyfriend wear this one.

The Meadow Fragrance Oil:
The Meadow is a wonderful scent. To me it smells like fresh cut grass, cucumber and a cool mountain steam with a hint of lily. It makes me think of a mountainous spa retreat with plenty of water nearby. A soothing scent with energy for revitalization!

Volturi Fragrance Oil:
Volturi smells like amber and lavender with hints of bergamot and lime. It reminds me of incense and has an Old World feel to it. It is very aristocratic. A very rich, sexy and royal scent!

Try these products and let us know what you think! We want to know what they inspire you to create!

Taylor

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