Archive for September, 2009

Cyclomethicone Testing, Part 3

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009

I have more Cyclomethicone Testing results for you.

Today, I tested Bay Rum, Christmas Tree, Blowing Bubbles, Apple Jack, Apricot Freesia, Autumn Afternoon, Angel (type), Amber Romance (type), Brown Sugar & Spice, and Bayberry Fragrance Oils. Blowing Bubbles and Brown Sugar & Spice Fragrance Oils were not compatible as the fragrance remained in beads and did not disperse at all. Amber Romance (type) has a faint cloudy appearance, while Christmas Tree has both a cloudy appearance and beads, so neither of these are compatible with Cyclomethicone.

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit.

Andee

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Mulling Pigments

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009
Back in May, nordagirl asked a question on the Starting With Color post. “Is there any reason you couldn’t use this same process with the dropper bottles to mix oxides or ultramarines with glycerine? If it makes any difference, I’m making CP soap only at this point.”

Unfortunately, glycerin is so thick and these pigments won’t fit through the hole of the dropper bottle. You can mull your pigments and create a thick paste to color your Cold Process Soap instead.

Now before you look at me like I’m crazy and wonder what mulling is, I’ll explain it. Mulling is when you mix a pigment to pulverize the clumps of pigment in preparing a paste for painting or coloring soap.

Collect needed supplies:
Glass mortar and pestle or a flat pane of glass and a flat bottom drinking glass
Glycerin
Pigment Color of your choice (I used Lavender Fields Color)
Rubber Scraper

There are two methods to use with mulling a pigment. I have taken photos of the first method.

#1 Pour a small amount of glycerin into the mortar. Use the pestle to coat the sides of the mortar with glycerin. Once the sides of the mortar have been coated, add 1 teaspoon of dry color into the mortar. Start mixing the color into the glycerin until you have created a tacky color paste.

#2 Scoop 1 teaspoon of dry color into the mortar. Use the pestle to make a small well in the mound of pigment. Pour a few drops of glycerin into the well. Start mixing the glycerin into the pigment and continue mixing until you either need more glycerin or you have created a tacky color paste.

Both methods will help prevent surprise clumps of color in your products, as well as allow you to store the paste in a small jar until you are ready to use the color. Yippee!

Isn’t that so easy?

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

Pouring some glycerin into the mortar.

Pouring some glycerin into the mortar.

Adding the pigment.

Adding the pigment.

Using the pestle to start mixing.

Using the pestle to start mixing.

There still are lots of pigment clumps.

There still are lots of pigment clumps.

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Confetti Soap, Part 2

Monday, September 28th, 2009
Thursday, I made three batches of soap with colors for making a confetti soap. Today, I’m going to grate and chop those batches to show you the difference between pieces and then use the pieces to make two separate batches of confetti soap.

Collect needed supplies:
Soap we made on Thursday
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Fragrance Oil of your choice (I’m going to be using Pears & Berries Fragrance Oil)
Scale

Recipe in ounces:
40 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
20 ounces weight Coconut Oil
20 ounces weight Olive Oil

30 fluid ounces water
11 ounces weight sodium hydroxide

1.4 ounces of Pears & Berries Fragrance Oil

24 ounces of soap shreds from soap made on Thursday. I used 8 ounces of each color.

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 2 minutes
Mix shreds or chunks into the soap solution: 30 seconds
Pour into mold: 30 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

Notes:
You will want to make sure that the soap is thicker than the water thin trace that we generally have. This will prevent the soap shreds from settling to the bottom of soap.

Have fun!

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

Shredded soap.

Shredded soap.

Measured oils.

Measured oils.

Mixing the lye solution.

Mixing the lye solution.

Placing shreds into a plastic bag.

Placing shreds into a plastic bag.

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Confetti Soap, Part 1

Thursday, September 24th, 2009

My three soaps after finishing the last batch.

My three soaps after finishing the last batch.

I love playing with confetti, but I absolutely hate cleaning it up. Why not make a cold process Confetti Soap that embodies the joy of playing with confetti while keeping the mess to a minimum? Today, we will make the colored cold process soap for our confetti soap. I will use our pigments to prevent bleeding colors. I am going to use the same recipe that we use for our test batches.

Collect needed supplies:
Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
Coconut Oil
Olive Oil
Pigments of your choice (I’m going to be using Mint Green, Lavender Fields, and Amethyst Pink
Fragrance Oil of your choice (I’m going to be using Pears & Berries Fragrance Oil)

Recipe in ounces:
8 ounces weight Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
4 ounces weight Coconut Oil
4 ounces weight Olive Oil

2.2 ounces Sodium Hydroxide
6 fluid ounces Water

0.2 ounces of Pears & Berries Fragrance Oil

1 teaspoon of desired color

Weighing time: 8 minutes
Adding lye to water: 5 seconds, followed by 60 seconds of stirring
Heating of oils time: 2 minutes
Pouring lye solution into the fat mixture: 5 seconds
Using immersion blender to mix soap solution: 90 seconds
Pour into mold: 10 seconds
Allow soap to rest: 24 hours

I will make my three color batches today, and tomorrow I will show you how to make the confetti soap.

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Spiky Melt & Pour Soap Winners

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

Remember the Melt & Pour Soap that had those funny spikes on it? Some of your answers were so great, I found myself rolling on the floor laughing (quite literally).

How did these spikes occur?

The soap has just dried out. There is not enough water to keep the soap balanced, and the soap has started crystallizing due to higher concentrations of soap.

Nothing is wrong with this soap, it can still be used. I just wash the soap off and no one can tell it ever had spikes.

Here are the ideas that were given:

Dedrianne asked, “Would that not be oxidation?”

Sharon said, “I would think it could be a moisture reaction. Moisture beads and the soap swells in that area and then dries again, causing spikes.”

Jeanene said, “Glycerin.”

jaspersgarden said, “My guess is that it is glycerin leaking out – big time! Even though my soap was shrink wrapped, I’m pretty sure that humidity got to it and caused the glycerin to seep out.”

timtoys said, “I believe the crystals form when the soap has been in a humid environment. The soap sweats and then as the humidity drops the moisture dries up leaving the crystals behind.”

Julie Marcil said, “I would go with the crystal suggestion of Timtoys. Although, what the crystals are … I give my tongue to the cat! (French expression)”

thienkim said, “Maybe your soap had a big party while you were gone. Dressed up, drank too much and got some “body decoration.” otherwise, I have no idea.”

Zany said, “I’ve never done M&P so my best guess is that sad little soapie developed a rash from neglect. Bad Mommy! LOL”

As I promised, I will be sending all of you a prize. I have been working with several fragrances that are quite fun and I will be sharing the fun with you. I will send you your own bottle of fragrance oil to play with. I will be contacting you shortly for a shipping address.

I hope you enjoy!

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

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Ratios, Percentages and Parts Per…

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

Sometimes, I am so confused when I start reading recipes or other important papers that reference ratios, percentages and parts per …(fill in the blank). Over the weekend, I had a stunning revelation that clarified all of these confusing terms for me.

This revelation came as I was making grits for our family breakfast and to make sure there were enough left over to feed chickens. Now you may ask, how did this come about while making breakfast? The yellow coarse cut grits that we use needs 4 parts water and 1 part grits, also known as a 4:1 ratio. This is a total of 5 parts. Before, I just always asked for how much water and how much grits I needed to measure. This revelation made me understand that I can alter the recipe to equal how much I want to make. For example, if I wanted to make grits for just myself, I would use 1 cup of water and 1/4 cup grits. If I wanted to feed a family of 4 and give a small flock of chickens the leftovers, I would use 8 cups of water and 2 cups of grits. The percentages are 80% water and 20% grits.

Most fragrance blends are done in parts. For example, the Halloween Candy Bag blend I made last week is a 3:1 ratio, 3 parts Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil and 1 part Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil. This is a total of 4 parts. This could also be shown in percentages, 75% Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil and 25% Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil.

If you can count pennies, nickles, dimes and quarters to make a dollar, then you already know how to use percentages. Pennies are the equivalent to 1%. Nickles are the equivalent to 5%. Dimes are the equivalent to 10%. Quarters are the equivalent to 25%. You must be able to create something that is equal to $1.00 using different combinations of these four coins. Just like making $1.00, you must make 100% using percentages. You can’t make 98%, 99% or 67%, you must make 100%.

What if you have a lotion recipe that weighs 10 ounces and you need to use a preservative? How do you calculate a preservative for that? Let’s say that we were going to Liquid Germall Plus as our preservative. Liquid Germall Plus has a usage rate of 0.1% to 0.5%. How much is that?

Let’s start with 0.1%.

10 ounces X 0.001 (0.1%) = 0.1 ounces to be added to lotion

Now let’s try 0.5%.

10 ounces X 0.005 (0.5%) = 0.5 ounces to be added to lotion

How did I calculate that 0.5% is equal to 0.005? I removed the percentage sign, and moved the decimal point two places to the left. Even if I was calculating 15%, the decimal point would still move two places to the left. Now, 15% is 0.15 and easy to multiply, because this is the same as if I had $0.15.

Now onto parts per … (fill in the blank). Usually, we see the term parts per million, abbreviated as ppm, on a Certificate of Analysis. This usually tells us how many parts of something there are in a million. If we used the ratio for hummingbird sugar water, 4 parts water and 1 part sugar, which is a total of 5 parts, what would the parts per … be? The sugar would be at 200,000 parts per million parts of solution.

Let me show you a comparison between ratios, percentages and parts per … using the Halloween Candy Bag blend.

_______
Parts
Ratio
Percentages
Parts per ten
Parts per hundred
Parts per thousand
Parts per million
Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil
3
3
75%
7.5
75
750
750,000 ppm
Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
1
1
25%
2.5
25
250
250,000 ppm
Final Appearance
4 parts
3:1 Ratio
100% Halloween Candy Bag

I hope my revelation has made sense to you.

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

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Halloween Pumpkin Bath Salts

Monday, September 21st, 2009
On Friday, I made Halloween Pumpkin Bath Fizzies and they were so cute, I just had to make bath salts! Feel free to drool all you desire over these adorable salts, just make sure you don’t soak your keyboard!

Collect needed supplies:
Salt of your choice (I used Fine Dead Sea Salt)
Orange Color Spray Bottle (Made on September 18th)
Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil
Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
Small Clear Gusseted Bags
Small Transfer Pipettes
Scale
Heavy Duty Plastic Zip Bags
Ribbon (I used yarn)
Black Permanent Marker

Fragrance Blend:
1 part Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
3 parts Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil

Recipe in ounces:
24 ounces Fine Dead Sea Salt
0.03 ounces Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
0.09 ounces Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil

Weigh the salt into the heavy duty plastic zip bag. Add the fragrance oil and then knead until there are no more clumps. Gently spray the salt two to six times with the color and mix. Repeat until the salt is the color you desire. I used about 50 sprays of color. Fill the gusseted bags and tie closed.

Enjoy!

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

Adding fragrance oil to the salt.

Adding fragrance oil to the salt.

Kneading the salt.

Kneading the salt.

Spraying the salt with orange color.

Spraying the salt with orange color.

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Halloween Pumpkin Bath Fizzies

Friday, September 18th, 2009
I can’t believe that Halloween is just around the corner! As I like the scent of filled candy bags, I started some fragrance blending for a Halloween Candy Bag fragrance. I struggled making the blend because I wanted some spice to the scent, but I wanted some sweet uplifting notes too.

Collect needed supplies:
Baking Soda
Citric Acid
Cornstarch
Lemon Yellow Dry Color
Purple Raspberry Dry Color
Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil
Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
Small spray bottle
.15 cc scoops
Small Clear Gusseted Bags
Small Transfer Pipettes
Scale
Mixing Bowl or heavy duty plastic zip bags
Ribbon (I used yarn)
Black Permanent Marker
Water

Fragrance Blend:
1 part Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
3 parts Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil

Recipe in ounces:
12 ounces Baking Soda
6 ounces Citric Acid
2 ounces Cornstarch
0.03 ounces Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
0.09 ounces Lemon Sugar type Fragrance Oil

Recipe in grams:
320 grams Baking Soda
170 grams Citric Acid
57 grams Cornstarch
0.8 grams Cinnamon Bear Fragrance Oil
2.5 grams Lemon Sugar Fragrance Oil

Color Spray:
0.15 cc Purple Raspberry Dry Color
0.15 cc Lemon Yellow Dry Color
Water to top off the spray bottle

Weigh the dry ingredients into the mixing bowl or bag and mix gently. Add the fragrance oils and mix well to break up all the clumps. Set aside while mixing color spray. Add dry color to the empty spray bottle and top off with water. Cap the bottle and shake until mixed. Don’t worry that the bottle looks like it is filled with a red color. It will be orange when you spray.

Gently spray the dry ingredients with the color spray about two to four times and then mix. Repeat until the dry ingredients all have a light orange color. I used 45 sprays of color. Set the mixture aside while you prepare the gusseted bags.

Draw a face for your pumpkin on the lower third of the bag. Triangle eyes, crooked teeth, big smiles, crazy eyes, small noses, you name it. Fill your bag with the bath fizzies and tie closed with a ribbon. These adorable bags of bath fizzies are now ready to give away! Can’t you just see a cute little stack of bath fizzy pumpkins sitting on the bathroom counter that are ready to be used?

Notes:
This fragrance blend has some spice notes with sweetness. As one of the guys on staff described this blend, “It has a tad bit of chocolate and caramel swirl with Atomic Fireballs and Jolly Ranchers!” Whatever they say, this fragrance blend is delicious, since everyone agreed that it smelled like candy. Just what I was aiming for!

If you want a darker orange color, double or triple the dry colors when adding to the bottle and then top off with water. This will make the color stronger.

Change to color to green and you could have Frankenstein. You can also make the Magic Color Bath Fizzies and make ghosts! Let your imagination run wild and play with various Halloween creatures!

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit. Remember, this kit is worth $280! Wow!

Andee

Dry ingredients weighed into a zip bag.

Dry ingredients weighed into a zip bag.

After the fragrances were added.

After the fragrances were added.

Kneading the bath fizzies.

Kneading the bath fizzies.

Spraying the bath fizzies.

Spraying the bath fizzies.

Finished bath fizzies color.

Finished bath fizzies color.

Drawing the faces on the bags.

Drawing the faces on the bags.

Filled pumpkin bags!

Filled pumpkin bags!

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Line Prevention Serum

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

We just released the Line Prevention Serum almost two weeks ago. This serum is amazing and you can add any extracts or fragrances and essentials that you desire.

I can think of several possibilities for using different extracts and essentials to add to the line prevention serum.

Mature Skin: Rose Otto and Orchid Extract or Ivy Extract
Acne Prone Skin: Tea Tree or Lavender Essential Oils and Horsetail Grass Extract or Comfrey Leaves Extract
For Soothing Skin: Neroli or Bourbon Geranium Essential Oils and Chamomile Extract or Aloe Extract

This serum reminds me of the Bath & Body Works product that has been discontinued.

Do you have anymore ideas?

Enjoy!

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit.

Andee

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Cyclomethicone Testing, Part 2

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Last week I started my Cyclomethicone Testing and I told you I would continue to post my results as I tested.

Today, I tested Earth, Plumberry Spice, Rose, Soothing Chamomile, Toasted Coconut, and Tahitian Vanilla Fragrance Oils. Plumberry Spice and Tahitian Vanilla Fragrance Oils were not compatible as the fragrance remained in beads and did not disperse at all. Soothing Chamomile has a faint cloudy appearance, and therefore is not compatible with Cyclomethicone.

Submit your photos and text for the guest written Embedded Melt & Pour Soap Challenge! Submissions will be accepted through October 18th at blog@thesage.com. The submissions will be released October 19th through October 23rd. Each guest writer will receive a $25 gift certificate.

Don’t forget to submit your blog or video posts to win the MMS Perfumer’s Kit.

Andee

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