Pronunciation Guide to MMS Products, Part 3

I have started giving the pronunciation for various MMS products, and now it is time for the fixed oils! Don’t forget, if you have other products you would like to hear the pronunciation, e-mail me and I will add a pronunciation to the blog.

Borage Oil: Bor-ij. Have you seen the flowers of the borage plant? They are gorgeous! The plant is prickly and can be considered a weed. It originally was cultivated for medical and culinary purposes, which included candying the flowers and brewing teas to help fevers. Today it is primarily cultivated as an oilseed. The University of Arizona has a great description of borage on their extension website. Borage is frequently used in creams that are made for helping psoriasis and eczema. This is a fabulous oil and can be used in any cream you desire!

Calendula Oil: Kuh-len-jew-luh. Calendula is also called Pot Marigold or Scotch Marigold. The plant has been used medicinally, in culinary dishes, or as dye for fabrics, cosmetics and food. This oil has been used for its anti-inflammatory properties as well as combating rough or scaly skin. Wouldn’t this be excellent for a foot cream?

The Euphorbia in our yard.
The Euphorbia in our yard.

Candelilla Wax: Kan-dl-ee-uh. Candelilla is a vegetable wax that is often used to replace beeswax. I have found this to be useful and the great thing about Candelilla Wax is that you only need half of the amount that you would have used in Beeswax. Candelilla is also used in the food industry as a glazing agent or a binding agent for chewing gum. Candelilla is derived from the Euphorbia plant. It is very beautiful plant in any yard!

Carnauba Wax: Kahr-new-buh. Carnauba is derived from the leaves of the carnauba palm. You can find carnauba wax used in various products such as automobile waxes, candy corn, dental floss, mascara, frosting, chewing gum, and even for coating medicine. I have used Carnauba Wax for the various lip glosses I have shown on the blog.

Jojoba Oil: Hoh-hoh-buh. This oil always makes me think of laughter from Santa Claus and that has caused this pronunciation to stick very clearly in my mind. Does it work for you? Did you know that until the 1970s, jojoba was only used by the Native Americans who harvested it for its burn healing properties. Jojoba is actually not an oil, but it is a liquid wax ester.

Shea Butter: Shey. This butter is great either by itself or in any other products you can think of. The shea tree is indigenous to Western Africa and it takes approximately 15 years of growth before the tree begins to bear fruit. It is used for food products as a substitute for butter. Shea butter is also called African Karité Butter. Did you know the book “Roots” by Alex Haley talks about the shea nut tree?

Tamanu Oil: Tuh-mahn-oo. I remember when we were testing the Tamanau Oil, and since I have some of the driest hands around the warehouse, I was asked to test the Tamanu Oil on my hands for two weeks to see how it worked. It helped my cracked knuckles in no time at all! Tamanu is derived from an evergreen that is native to East Africa, southern coastal India, Malaysia and Australia. It smells just like butter pecan ice cream! Yummy!

On Monday, I’ll show how to make soap petals! These are so much fun to use for yourself or give to others!

Don’t forget about the Food Soap Show & Tell for Father’s Day. I’m looking forward to seeing your bacon soaps!
Andee

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Pronunciation Guide to MMS Products, Part 2

Monday and Tuesday had some great posts from jaspersgarden and shelikesspring. Both of you rose beyond the call of duty and had some wonderful pictures and text! As I promised, both of you will be sent the gift certificates as well as some very fun gifts. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and expertise!

Yesterday, I covered the pronunciation of the new fragrances, but what about the some of the fragrances and essential oils that have been in the catalog for some time? Let’s start alphabetically with the essential oils!

Bergamot Essential Oil: Bur-guh-mot. Bergamot is used in a black tea blend called Earl Grey Tea. Bergamot definitely has some great fun notes to add the the overall citrusy appeal of the essential oil.

Eucalyptus Citriodora Essential Oil: Ewe-cal-ip-tus Sit-re-o-door-a. Lemon Eucalyptus is also another name for this wonderful essential oil. Eucalyptus Citriodora is not as medicinal smelling as Eucalyptus and is very a enjoyable essential oil to add to your collection.

Litsea Cubeba Essential Oil: Lit-see-a Cu-beb-a. I’ve found the best way to describe Litsea Cubeba is with two words, lemony herbs. Ah, a beautiful combination and great for any who adore lemon.

Peppermint Essential Oil, Williamette Valley: Wi-lam-it. Willamette Valley Peppermint is greener in notes than a traditional peppermint. This is great for those that don’t care for Peppermint, but they do enjoy Spearmint.

Now I’m finished with the essential oils, so let’s move on to the fragrance oils.

Awapuhi Seaberry Fragrance Oil: Ah-wa-poo-ee See-bear-ee. Awaphui Seaberry is one of the fragrances we recommend for a fresh clean unisex scent. In Hawaiian, Awapuhi means White Ginger. This fragrance has hints of the beautiful flower of the White Ginger plant, as well as melon and berry notes and a whiff of the sea breeze! Close your eyes and enjoy the Hawaiian Islands!

Bergamot & Chamomile Fragrance Oil: Bur-guh-mot and Cam-uh-meel. This has been a staff favorite since it was introduced and most of our staff loves the pick-me-up feeling it seems to evoke.

Kailua Bay Fragrance Oil: Kahy-loo-ah. This fragrance can trick even those that live on the Hawaiian Islands and smell the tuber roses that grow there. Why buy a plane ticket to the Hawaiian Islands when you can be transported there with Kailua Bay?

Now I’ve covered the fragrance and essential oils that I know have had questions about pronunciation in the past. Since I’m on a roll with the pronunciation, I’ll share products from the Additives section of the catalog.

Allantoin: uh-lan-toh-in. Allantoin has been used as a skin protectant and is also used for its ability to hasten the growth of new and healthy tissue.

Dipropylene Glycol: Dahy-proh-puh-leen Glahy-kawl. While some people stumble over the pronunciation and just call this DPG for short, you will impress others with your ability to pronounce this.

Isopropyl Myristate: Ahy-suh-proh-pil My-ris-tate. Isopropyl Myristate or also known as IPM, is used to help reduce the greasy feeling in lotions and creams. Use the oils you want, but don’t keep the greasy feel!

Natrasorb: Nay-tra-sawrb. Natrasorb is frequently used to add fragrance to bath salts, and make bath fizzies lighter. This is such a fluffy powder, but it is lots of fun!

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate: Soh-dee-uhm Lawr-il Suhl-foh-as-i-teyt. Whew! That one definitely takes a mouthful and talking slowly. This is great for making foaming bath salts or foaming bath bombs. Check out the Foaming Fruity Layers on the blog for a great idea! You can also add Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate to your Melt and Pour Soap for more bubbles. Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate is also called SLSA.

Squalane: Skwey-leyn. Squalane is a cousin to the squalene (skwey-leen) that naturally occurs in our skin. Rub your finger on the side of your nose and then place your finger on a smooth surface like glass or plastic. Can you see the finger print? That is the squalene that your skin produces. I love squalane for the moisturizing capabilities it has without the greasy feeling.

Tomorrow I’ll share the pronunciation for the fixed oils. I hope these have helped you!

Don’t forget about the Food Soap Show & Tell for Father’s Day. I’m looking forward to seeing your bacon soaps!
Andee

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Pronunciation Guide to MMS Products, Part 1

We have an Audio Version of this blog at the bottom of this post. Don’t forget to download these audio versions of the blog!

If you have been watching the New Products section of the catalog lately, then you will know that we have released several new fragrances. Some of these new fragrances have quite the mouthful for names. Today, I’ll share the correct pronunciation for these new fragrances.

Let’s start with Acai and Mangosteen Fragrance Oil.

Acai and Mangosteen Fragrance Oil: Aw-saw-ee and Mang-guh-steen. Wow! Such a mouthful for such a yummy fragrance. It is very refreshing and a great pick-me-up scent. I think I’ll use it in a body wash!

Kalahari Melon Fragrance Oil: Kal-uh-hahr-ee Mel-uhn. If you enjoy melons, this is a great scent for you. I think this would even be a great scent for tweens!

Rooibos Tea Fragrance Oil: Roy-boss Tee. While this word is so confusing for the pronunciation, it doesn’t mean this fragrance is confusing. This smells just like the Rooibos Tea I had earlier this morning. Now I want to go brew another cup of tea!

I hope these have helped you. Are there are other products you would like learn pronunciation, feel free to e-mail me and I will post another entry with that pronunciation. For those that have been listening to the audio version of this post, I hope you have enjoyed it!

Don’t forget about the Food Soap Show & Tell for Father’s Day. I’m looking forward to seeing your bacon soaps!
Andee

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Hot Process Soap by shelikesspring

Andee,

I’m not sure exactly what you are looking for regarding the Hot Process Soap submission, nor have I ever written any blog.

So here it goes – toss it if you need to. :-)

I’m very new to Hot Process soap making and fairly new to soap making in general.

My first attempt at it is shown below.
9y18-101

This was intended to be a lavender soap with a white base and purple swirl along with pink accents.

Obviously, this did not turn out as I had hoped. When I first took it out of the mold, it looked hideous.

After hacking away, it has turned out – well, looks are so subjective.

My second attempt is next.
9y18-102

Ack! More colorant issues! Despite what it looks like, there aren’t any lye pockets – I tested it with Phenolphthalein. This soap is scented with vanilla – thus the brown areas. What was I thinking?!

My third attempt –
9y18-103

Yep, that’s right. It ended up in the garbage. Dried up. I tried to do a 1-lb batch which was just too small for this crock pot and for my skill level.

The fourth attempt is shown below.
9y18-104

This soap is more of what I was looking for. The bottom layer has no additives. The second layer has honey and oatmeal. The third layer has just oatmeal, and the last layer is just honey (note the lack of colorant:-)).

There is no fragrance in this batch other than the additives.

Indeed, I do plan on venturing forth with colorants – all in good time. It’s nice to be able to use the soap almost right away. And I like finding out my mistakes quickly as well.

The moral of the pictures – as it is with Cold Process, there will always be
surprises. :-)

Thanks for reading,

shelikesspring

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Hot Process Soap by jaspersgarden

Hello fellow soapers! My name is Kathy and I have volunteered to be a guest writer for my method of Hot Process using a Crock Pot.

Equipment Needed:
Mold for soap – line with freezer paper while soap is cooking ;-)
Recipe (handwritten) and a print out of the MMS Calculation for the lye, liquid & SF (Solid Form)
ALL oils, butters, Fragrance Oils or Essential Oils, colorants, additives, lye and the liquid(s) of choice – sitting on my counter so that I know I do have what my recipe calls for
Measuring spoon for colorants
Shot glass for Fragrance Oils or Essential Oils
Thermometer for oils – optional for Hot Process
Thermometer for lye solution – optional for Hot Process
Spatula – must be heat-resistant – 450° to 600°
Stick Blender
Large stainless steel pot for melting hard oils & butters
Small white towels – to lay stick blender & spatula on
Large Pyrex measuring cup (32 oz) to weigh out distilled water and individual oils
Medium Pyrex measuring cup (16 oz) for distilled water and Goat Milk Powder
Plastic cup (10 oz) for distilled water and honey
Heat resistant cutting board – for soap mold
Empty dish pan for non-lye dirty dishes
Dish pan filled half-way with water, dish soap & vinegar – for anything with lye in/on it
Packing paper for soap table
Paper towels – for cleaning spills
Spray bottle of vinegar – in case of emergency
Scale – set to grams for lye and ounces for everything else
Flat pot holders to sit hot pot of oils on and the crock pot when finished (or use bath size towels – folded 4 times)
Pen or highlighter – to check off each ingredient as it goes into the pot
Neoprene Gloves
Dust Mask
Face shield/mask
Arm socks – men’s white tube socks with the toe cut off
Pull hair back in a ponytail
Tablespoon to measure out lye
24 oz plastic cup to measure out lye
Dryer sheet – to wipe out plastic cup and measuring spoon – to stop static electricity
Flathead screwdriver – to open and close lye can
Lye pitcher and cover – I use a Kool-Aid plastic pitcher
2 Hole Spoons from MMS – one for lye solution, one for melting oils
7 x 7 x 6 Cardboard box – to sit Solution Pitcher in (outside of shop)
Piece of Freezer Paper – to cover the soap in mold to keep the dust off of it
6 Quart Crock Pot – mine has 3 settings – Warm, LO and HI

Formula:
12 oz Coconut Oil
8 oz Palm Kernel Oil
8 oz Sweet Almond Oil
2 oz Castor Oil
4 oz Hempseed Oil
24 oz Olive Oil
½ – 1 tsp of light Gold Mica – mix with melted oils

16.5 oz Distilled Water (MMS calculator calls for 15 – 22 fluid ounces)
8.2 oz Lye (6% SF)

After the cook:
2.5 oz Distilled Water and 1 Tb Honey – warmed slightly
3 oz Distilled Water and 12 Tb Goatsmilk Powder – cold & slushy, but not frozen
1 oz Cinnamon Bun fragrance oil (Note: Could have used more)

I put all of my safety gear on first then measure out my distilled water and lye solution. Stir until clear. Sit outside with the cover on it. When I make Hot Process, I always use the full amount of liquid called for on the MMS calculator. In this case, I made the decision to use 5.5 oz after the cook. You take a chance when you use less liquid because you’re cooking your soap – so it needs all of the liquid to prevent it from burning or drying out. Think of cooking a pot roast in a crock pot – you need liquid to keep it moist!

I then measure out my hard oils and melt them in a stainless steel pot. Now you’re probably wondering why I don’t use the crock pot to melt my hard oils! Well, let me tell you…I did this one time and it took f-o-r-e-v-e-r to melt the hard oils. THEN I had to wait for the crock pot to cool down before proceeding with my solution. Never again! Just use a stainless steel pot for melting the hard oils.

Once my oils are melted, I pour them into the Crock Pot and add the rest of my measured out liquid oils. Give it a good stir. Take your lye solution and pour it slowly into the Crock Pot and stir with a hole spoon. I then use my Stick Blender to bring it to trace. I like a medium to heavy trace for this process. Start time for cooking the soap is 1:50 PM. I’m sorry that I do not have pictures to show you pouring my solution into my oils…only have 2 hands!

For Crock Pot Hot Process, I cook the soap on LOW. If you use the higher setting, it’s going to dry out or worse, burn your soap.

OK, you’re probably wondering – should I stir or leave it alone while it’s cooking! I leave it alone – I do NOT stir my soap unless it’s spitting/spilling over the sides of the Crock Pot. If your soap does start spitting/spilling over the sides of your Crock Pot – first check the temp setting you put it on. If you used HIGH, it’s going to cook too quickly and it will spit/spill over the sides of the Crock Pot. Keep it on LOW and you should be fine. Also, DO NOT REMOVE the lid ;-)

See how it looks like it’s drying out around the edges of the Crock Pot? This is normal – leave it alone!

Now it looks like it’s going to start spitting/spilling over the sides of the Crock Pot. Just watch it, don’t remove the lid unless it does start spilling over the sides of the Crock Pot. You can see in the background that my Milk/Water and FO is ready. (The Honey/Water is ready also, just not in the picture)

You can see how the soap on the edges are kind of “folding over” onto itself. This is a really good sign that my soap is almost done!!

At 4:50 PM (3 hours cook time) I removed the inner crock from the pot. Please make sure you use heavy-duty, flat pot holders or a towel folded over 4 times. You don’t want to burn your counter. That inner pot is HOT, so use caution while working with it. I use heavy duty pot holders to hold the sides of the inner pot while stirring it. You will also need a folded over towel for the very hot Crock Pot lid.

The soap should look like Vaseline and mashed potatoes mixed together. I don’t know how to explain it any better than that! Once the soap in your Crock Pot has folded over onto itself – it’s done. I’ve had some recipes that only took 1 ½ hours, some 2 hours – it just depends on your recipe. This one took 3 hours total cook time.

Once you remove the inner crock from the pot, stir it to help cool it down. At this stage, you don’t want it to cool down too much because then you’ll have a very hard time glopping it into your mold. Once it cooled down (use your own judgment – I stirred for 5 minutes here) I then added my water/honey, slushy water/powdered goatsmilk and my FO. Stir Stir Stir!!! I stirred for another 5 minutes. You need to make sure that these ingredients are stirred in very well – or you’re going to end up with pockets of milk, honey or FO – not a good thing!!

Now it’s time to literally “glop” your soap into your mold! You will need a heat-resistant spatula to get it out of the Crock Pot. Do the best you can, I use the spatula to scrape the sides of the Crock Pot also. Waste not!!

You can see that I spent too much time getting the soap into the mold. Some bars are very dry looking – so work quickly getting the soap into your mold! There’s nothing wrong with the dry looking bars, they’re just not aesthetically pleasing.

Notes:
The only time I have had my Crock Pot Hot Process soap spit/spill over the sides of my 6 quart Crock Pot is when I tried to use more than 64 oz of oil and 24 oz of liquid. Oh yea – I had what looked like a volcano! I did have to remove the lid and stir it down, plus I had to watch it constantly – not very fun!

I do not use thermometers for my Solution or my melted Oils. I have found with Hot Process – it just doesn’t matter! You’re going to be cooking the soap!!

On one batch, I used liquid Goat Milk (from the grocery store) – holy cow! If you do use liquid Goat Milk – make sure you have very good ventilation. The smell of ammonia (which is normal for milk soaps) will overwhelm you. I was getting a horrible headache plus I was gagging the whole time. I only cooked it for 1 hour, then I went ahead and poured it into my mold. It was not done cooking! The next day, I had oil sitting on top of the soap. I threw it away. What I should have done at that point was cut it up, put it back into the Crock Pot, plug it in outside on the patio and let it cook another hour or so. Oh well, live and learn! I do
have pics of this batch if anyone wants to see it. Too bad we don’t have scratch & sniff, the smell was absolutely horrid! This is why I used Goatsmilk Powder/Distilled Water AFTER cooking in this batch!!

While the soap is cooking, use the time to clean up your soap table, make notes on your handwritten recipe, read a book, dance – whatever! I use the cooking time to line my mold, get my additives ready, then I clean up my area and make any notes about the batch. Do not leave your Crock Pot unattended – not even for a minute! If you need to leave (bathroom break) get your spouse or teenager to watch it for you until you come back. If you don’t have anyone to watch your Crock Pot – turn it off until you come back. A few minutes is not going to hurt it. Better to be safe than sorry.

You do not need to insulate Hot Process soap. I do use a piece of freezer paper over the mold, but that’s only to keep dust off of my soap. Also, it’s a good idea to use one of those heat-resistant cutting boards to place your mold of soap on – to protect your counter.

I unmold and cut my soap 24 hours after I’ve glopped it into my mold. Hot Process soap is ready to use once the soap is cool – usually 8 hours later. But, to prolong the use of the soap, I let it sit for a week to 10 days – to dry it out a little more. I then shrink wrap my soaps, weigh each one and place my cigar band label on them – ready for sale! (and use!)

I purchased a gallon (what was I thinking?!) of Sodium Lactate from MMS to use with my Hot Process soap batches, but haven’t tried it yet. You add it to your lye solution at .25 oz PPO. (I think you decrease your liquid by the amount of Sodium Lactate that you use) Supposedly, it keeps the batch smoother and easier to get into your mold! Instead of glopping the soap into the mold, you can actually pour it in your mold – supposedly. Like I said, I haven’t tried it!! It would be sooo nice if it’s true!

You can use any CP recipe that you’ve made – just remember to keep your oils at or below 64 oz and liquid at 24 oz for a 6 Quart Crock Pot. And always use the full amount of liquid recommended on the MMS Calculator.

Have fun ;-)
Kathy

Here is my pot of melted oils and the light gold mica.
Here is my pot of melted oils and the light gold mica.
Medium to Heavy Trace.
Medium to Heavy Trace.
17 minutes into the cook.
17 minutes into the cook.
30 minutes into the cook.
30 minutes into the cook.
55 minutes into the cook.
55 minutes into the cook.
1 hour and 35 minutes into the cook.
1 hour and 35 minutes into the cook.
2 hours and 25 minutes into the cook.
2 hours and 25 minutes into the cook.
Close up view of edges "folding over."
Close up view of edges "folding over."
Top view of edges "folding over."
Top view of edges "folding over."
3 hours into the cook.
3 hours into the cook.
Stirring in the additives.
Stirring in the additives.
My soap glopped into the mold.
My soap glopped into the mold.
Close up of my soap in the mold.
Close up of my soap in the mold.

My empty crock pot.
My empty crock pot.
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What is Trace?

This is one of the questions I hear answered by our Technical Support Department while helping soap makers when they call wanting help. I thought that I could share some pictures previous soap batches I’ve made and show what you are looking for as indicators of the trace.

First things first, what is trace? According to all of our staff that have had experience making cold process soap, trace is simply when there are no more oils floating to the top of the raw soap. We also described it well on Cold Process Soap, Day Three.

Trace is a term that is vague, it is used in every soap book, yet is far more fluid than every beginner expects. Trace is an indication oil will no longer rise to the surface when mixing is stopped. If you aren’t sure if you have achieve trace then stop mixing, go get a glass, fill it with water, do not drink it. Come back to your soap. Is oil floating on the surface? Oil is floating if you see a dark appearance to the top and it appears very slick. A quick press of the button on your immersion blender will tell you if oil has risen. A dark swirl appears on the top of soap close to trace, but not quite there. Keep blending if you see this happen. If the soap looks homogeneous, pour into the mold.

Trace is sometimes explained as having the ability to hold an impression on the surface of the soap. This is true if you have a light across the room and you can see its reflection on the surface of your soap. Gently touch the surface of the soap with a spoon and draw a star or heart. If you can see the raised impression left on the soap from your spoon, you are at trace. Pour into the mold.

Trace is not about being as thick as a milk shake, or about being thick at all. If you could see the mixture we pour into the molds, you would be surprised that our soap looks more like pouring skim milk than it does look like cream of a milk shake. Think fluid!

You can click on the pictures to enlarge them and see the notes that I’ve written on them.

Next week is Hot Process Soap Week!
Andee

9y21-02
9y21-101
9y21-03
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Gardener’s Hand Therapy

Last week I shared my experiences at the local Gardener’s Market as well as my thoughts that officially felt like growing season now. I’ve been pulling weeds out of the garden and arguing with chickens over the spots they can dig. Not that the chickens argue back, they just tilt their heads and look at me like I’m crazy for pushing them out of the freshly tilled soil. Maybe I am, but I like eating fresh vegetables and chickens digging up my newly planted seeds are not on my list of fresh vegetable enjoyment. These silly girls are so funny!

Unfortunately, I despise gardening while wearing gloves and if I’m not careful, the weeds shred my hands. Digging around in the dirt pulls all the moisture away from my skin and then since my hands are dry, they can crack and bleed. That just makes the gardening not fun anymore! This recipe was formulated for those of us that spend our evenings and weekends out in the garden, but anyone with dry skin could benefit from this great hand therapy butter. I love the Gardener’s Hand Therapy and I believe anyone can find a use for it.

Collect needed supplies:
Apricot Kernel Oil
Sweet Almond Oil
Beeswax
Regular Cocoa Butter
Mango Butter
Bourbon Geranium Essential Oil
scale
microwave
microwave safe beaker or glass jar
pipettes
Containers and caps of your choice

Recipe:
20 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
25 grams Sweet Almond Oil
14 grams Beeswax
5 grams Regular Cocoa Butter
5 grams Mango Butter
10-15 drops Bourbon Geranium Essential Oil

Weigh everything except the essential oil into the beaker. Melt, using the microwave in short bursts until everything is mostly melted. Once you have reached this point, you can add the Bourbon Geranium Essential Oil and stir well with a transfer pipette until all ingredients have been completely melted.

This recipe is great in the lip balm jars for small portable use. This recipe also can be used for the lips, but I would recommend that you use a flavor or essential oil that will be work with your lips.

Enjoy!

Next week is Hot Process Soap Week!
Andee

Collect all needed supplies.
Collect all needed supplies.
Taring the scale.
Taring the scale.
Weighing ingredients.
Weighing ingredients.

Mostly melted oils.
Mostly melted oils.

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Sun-Flower Power Light Lotion

Yesterday, I made a Sparkling Body Butter, but what about those out there that want a light summer lotion, but tell me, “Please! Forget the glitter!” I searched our recipe archives and found a great lotion. Sun-Flower Power is a light lotion that will give you a great summer lotion without making your skin feel heavy. If you live in a dry climate like ours, replace the Glycerin with Hydrovance and enjoy! I’m going to blend Lemon Zinger Fragrance Oil and Raspberry Fragrance Oil so we can make this smell like Raspberry Lemonade!

Collect needed items:
Citric Acid
Stearic Acid
Emulsifying Wax
Liquid Glycerin
Sunflower Oil
Coconut Oil
Water
Germaben II
Lemon Zinger Fragrance Oil
Raspberry Fragrance Oil
Scale
microwave
spoon
immersion blender
beaker or glass pyrex
transfer pipettes or droppers
jars and caps for filling

Recipe:
1.3 grams Citric Acid
9 grams Stearic Acid
20 grams Emulsifying Wax
10 grams Liquid Glycerin
65 grams High-Oleic Sunflower Oil
10 grams Coconut Oil
380 grams purified water
3.75 grams Germaben II
2.5 grams desired fragrance oil

How do you blend a Raspberry Lemonade Fragrance?

I like to take one of the Clear Glass Drams and fill it with the fragrances that I want to blend and use the blended fragrance when I need just small amount like this recipe. This glass dram holds about 5 mL, so I will make 4.5 mL of the blend. I’ll use 1.5 mL of Raspberry Fragrance Oil and 3 mL of Lemon Zinger Fragrance Oil. This allows for a sweet lemonade scent with a faint hint of fresh raspberries.

Weigh all ingredients into the beaker except for the Germaben II, Lemon Zinger Fragrance Oil, and Raspberry Fragrance Oil. Microwave for short bursts until all ingredients are melted. Once all the ingredients are melted, blend until all the ingredients are mixed well. Let the mixture cool and then add the Germaben II, Lemon Zinger Fragrance Oil, and Raspberry Fragrance Oil and mix well. Pour into the containers of your choice. Shake the cooling lotion to prevent the separation of the lotion. This is a great reason to recruit some helpers.

Next week is Hot Process Soap Week! I have two posts now!
Andee

Collect needed items.
Collect needed items.
Most of the ingredients weighed into the beaker.
Most of the ingredients weighed into the beaker.
Blending the ingredients with a immersion blender.
Blending the ingredients with a immersion blender.

Blending after adding the fragrance blend and Germaben II.
Blending after adding the fragrance blend and Germaben II.

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Sparkling Body Butter

I’m sure most people know someone that loves glitter. Today I’ll be making the Sparkling Body Butter found in our recipes section. This lotion is for those glitter fanatics in your life (or the Twilight fanatics). Just make sure that the lotion doesn’t end up right next to the lotion without glitter, otherwise you will have someone use a glitter lotion after the shower when they don’t mean/want to use it! This has happened before and we have heard all about it here at MMS! This recipe used Sunflower Fragrance Oil, but I figured since it is spring, I want to use Freesia Fragrance Oil.

Collect needed supplies:
Aloe Butter
White Cocoa Butter
Grapeseed Oil
Stearic Acid
Emulsifying Wax
distilled water
Liquid Glycerin
Vitamin E Acetate
Liquid Germall Plus
Freesia Fragrance Oil
Ultrafine Iridescent Glitter
Purple Raspberry Dropper Bottle from January 12, 2009
Scale
microwave
spoon
immersion blender
beaker or glass pyrex
transfer pipettes or droppers
jars and caps for filling

Recipe:
112 grams Aloe Butter
96 grams White Cocoa Butter
80 grams Grapeseed Oil
24 grams Stearic Acid
64 grams Emulsifying Wax
592 grams Distilled Water
24 grams Liquid Glycerin
16 grams Vitamin E Acetate
5 grams Liquid Germall Plus
10.00 grams Freesia Fragrance Oil
1 tsp Ultrafine Iridescent Glitter
2 drops of Purple Raspberry Color

Weigh all ingredients into the beaker except for the Liquid Germall Plus, Freesia Fragrance Oil, and Ultrafine Iridescent Glitter. Microwave for short bursts until all ingredients are melted. Once all the ingredients are melted, blend until all the ingredients are mixed well. Let the mixture cool and then add the Liquid Germall Plus, Freesia Fragrance Oil, Ultrafine Iridescent Glitter, and Purple Raspberry Color, and mix well. Pour into the containers of your choice.

This would be a great gift for dancers, or others that need some glitter on their skin when they perform. This would also be great for tweens, teens and others.

Next week is Hot Process Soap Week! I have two posts now!
Andee

Collect needed items.
Collect needed items.
Melted ingredients.
Melted ingredients.
Weighing the Liquid Germall Plus and Freesia Fragrance Oil.
Weighing the Liquid Germall Plus and Freesia Fragrance Oil.

Blending the ingredients.
Blending the ingredients.

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Blog Readers Challenge Questions Answered, Part 5

I’ve gotten a few responses from my questions on April 20th. Today, I’ll answer a question from jaspersgarden with help from Technical Support.

From jaspersgarden) Your 2nd question ~ I would really LOVE to make a liquid soap from scratch. I’m already familiar with NaOH, so I would have to pick up some KOH to get started – but I’m just scared to death for some reason when it comes to liquid soap…it’s probably really easy, but when you’re scared because you haven’t seen pictures and instructions, it’s hard to get up the nerve! I would really love to make my own shampoo ~ so that it would go nicely with my hair conditioner. I’ve tried your shampoo base already – but it’s not the same as making it yourself – do you know what I mean? It feels like I’m cheating or something ;o) And if I’m stuck using bases (I don’t have a problem using bases BTW!), are there ingredients I can add to it to make it more conditioning?

Certainly you should consider the Making Liquid Soaps book by Catherine Failor. It is a great book. KOH (potassium hydroxide) is not an easy product to find. Once you get some, make several batches. Soap is fun and you will find that liquid soap isn’t harder to do, it just is different. The nice thing about mixing KOH into water is that it doesn’t get as hot as NaOH (sodium hydroxide). This can be misleading to some people who think the KOH is bad, but it isn’t.

I really like liquid soaps made with anything but Castor Oil. I think castor oil liquid soaps feel gummy. So, personal preference is showing here. Let’s have a KOH soap day. Everyone who wants to participate should send a photo of their liquid soaps, during the making of the soap, and we will post them as a blog. Be sure to tell us what stage of the process the photo is representing. We will send gift certificates to our guest bloggers of the day.

PS: Bases aren’t cheating. They make available unique ingredient combinations to those of us who want only a little bit of soap. Bases also help with being cost effective for not storing unusual ingredients. Bases also make quick gifts. Don’t ever think that Bases are cheating, they are only a helping hand!


Hot Process Soap Week will be May 25th through May 29th.
Andee

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